newbie cable & cassette advice

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Ben Gold, Mar 5, 2003.

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  1. Ben Gold

    Ben Gold Guest

    Hi,

    I've gotten some good info from these groups (.misc/.tech) so far about my circa '88 Miyata. Aside
    from apparently sitting around indoors for many years, the bike seems in good shape.

    I've been taking the bike apart to clean it and for my own education.

    I've greased the stem and the seat-post and removed the chain-rings and cleaned them, and removed
    the rear wheel and done some cleaning. I've also removed the brake & shifting cables (which where
    dry and rusty).

    I'd like to buy new brake & compressionless shifting cables and I'd also like to dismantle the
    cassette and clean the gears individually.

    It appears to be a uniglide cassette – it's 6-speed with a shorter tooth every 7 teeth on the
    biggest gear (and progressively shorter spacing as you go smaller). The plastic guard says "suntour"
    but the cassette/hub says shimano.

    The shifters are down-tube "dura ace" style, they say "light action". The rear shifter is indexed,
    but can be switched to friction. The front shifter is just friction of course.

    So my questions are:

    Will any compressionless cables do for the shifters? The cables that were on the bike were bare
    (except for a short run of housing), can I buy housed cables instead and run it most of the way
    housed (under the bottom bracket)?

    Will any basic brake cables do? I have the housing, it's in good shape. Just wondering if there is
    any sort of thickness that I should be looking out. I saw some reference to thicker brake cables
    somewhere but cannot find the info again.

    I'd like to get a new chain and a removable link. It's overkill in a way, but it's really just so I
    can easily remove the chain as I learn how to tweak various parts. The chains I see listed online
    usually say the fit HyperGlide… but I'm pretty sure I have a Uniglide – will those chains and
    removable links fit my gears?

    Sorry for so many questions… i just don't want to spend money and end up with something I can't use.

    Thanks in advance,

    Ben
     
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  2. Ben Gold

    Ben Gold Guest

    > It appears to be a uniglide cassette ? it's 6-speed with a shorter tooth every 7 teeth on the
    > biggest gear (and progressively shorter spacing as you go smaller). The plastic guard says
    > "suntour" but the cassette/hub says shimano.

    I continue to learn. It's a freewheel, not a cassette.

    Anyway my questions about chains & cables still stand.

    -Ben
     
  3. [email protected] (Ben Gold) wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > Hi,
    >
    > I've gotten some good info from these groups (.misc/.tech) so far about my circa '88 Miyata. Aside
    > from apparently sitting around indoors for many years, the bike seems in good shape.
    >
    > I've been taking the bike apart to clean it and for my own education.
    >
    You're a man after my own heart.

    > I've greased the stem and the seat-post and removed the chain-rings and cleaned them, and removed
    > the rear wheel and done some cleaning. I've also removed the brake & shifting cables (which where
    > dry and rusty).

    Be sure the chain-rings are tight. This might require a special small tool ($4 or $5) to hold the
    nut while you tighten the bolt.
    >
    > I'd like to buy new brake & compressionless shifting cables and I'd also like to dismantle the
    > cassette and clean the gears individually.
    >
    Your idea to re-new the brake and shifter cables is good, but I'd do the housings also.

    Regarding the cassette (I'd guess it is a freewheel) my suggestion is to clean it as well as
    possible without taking it off the wheel. It may be worn and you won't know until you try it with
    your new chain. Later, if it is not worn, you can have your bike shop remove it and loosen it up so
    you can disassemble it by hand. That will save you from buying 2 or 3 tools (puller, chain whip,
    second chain whip or lockring tool.) A puller is nice to have, but if you need a new freewheel, it
    may take a different tool then the old one. By the way, 6 speed HG freewheels are nice. I put one on
    my wife's bike and the shifting improved lots. I think my lbs charged me $25 or 30 for it.

    > It appears to be a uniglide cassette ? it's 6-speed with a shorter tooth every 7 teeth on the
    > biggest gear (and progressively shorter spacing as you go smaller). The plastic guard says
    > "suntour" but the cassette/hub says shimano.

    The plastic guard is a spoke guard. It's not a part of the freewheel.
    >
    > The shifters are down-tube "dura ace" style, they say "light action". The rear shifter is indexed,
    > but can be switched to friction. The front shifter is just friction of course.
    >
    > So my questions are:
    >
    > Will any compressionless cables do for the shifters? The cables that were on the bike were bare
    > (except for a short run of housing), can I buy housed cables instead and run it most of the way
    > housed (under the bottom bracket)?
    >
    Good quality, stainless steel, not coated cables is what you're after here. Die drawn ones have
    smoother outsides and slide nicely. Should cost $3 to 5 each at your lbs. Take your old ones to the
    bike store to be sure you get the correct ends. Same goes for the shifter cables.

    If the shifter cables are stainless they won't rust so, why add lengths of housing. Are you planning
    to ride in lots of mud? In any case, you will be OK and save money by keeping the current routing
    with no extra housings.

    > Will any basic brake cables do? I have the housing, it's in good shape. Just wondering if there is
    > any sort of thickness that I should be looking out. I saw some reference to thicker brake cables
    > somewhere but cannot find the info again.
    >
    Good brake cables are 1.5mm diameter. Shifter cables are 1.2mm. Good housings are lined with
    slippery plastic tubes. I would replace the old housings if they are not lined. I wax the cables
    in the hope that it will provide some extra slip without attracting dirt. Not a big deal thing to
    do, though.

    Brake housings differ from shifter housings in design. It's important for modern index shifters to
    use the correct housing. You only need a small piece, so just bring the old one to the shop and let
    them cut you the correct length. Speaking of cutting, how did you plan to cut the cables and
    housings? It is nice to use a cable cutter tool for this job. Diagonal cutters squish the cables but
    I've done it. Do cap the cables to cover the cut ends when you are done. It is very handy to have a
    grinder to grind the ends of the housings after cutting. I use a Dremmel tool at home.

    > I'd like to get a new chain and a removable link. It's overkill in a way, but it's really just so
    > I can easily remove the chain as I learn how to tweak various parts. The chains I see listed
    > online usually say the fit HyperGlide? but I'm pretty sure I have a Uniglide ? will those chains
    > and removable links fit my gears?

    New Chain? Great idea. SRAM PC48. Comes with Superlink. Good chain and costs only $15.
    >
    > Sorry for so many questions? i just don't want to spend money and end up with something I
    > can't use.

    Have a ball.

    Steve Shapiro
    >
    > Thanks in advance,
    >
    > Ben
     
  4. Peter Cole

    Peter Cole Guest

    "Steve Shapiro" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > Speaking of cutting, how did you plan to cut the cables and housings? It is nice to use a cable
    > cutter tool for this job. Diagonal cutters squish the cables but I've done it. Do cap the cables
    > to cover the cut ends when you are done. It is very handy to have a grinder to grind the ends of
    > the housings after cutting. I use a Dremmel tool at home.

    I use a Dremel with a cutoff wheel to cut the cable housings (brake or SIS), makes it a one-step. I
    open up the (melted) plastic at the end by twirling a small drill bit in it.
     
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