Newbie - help, guidance, inspiration, etc.

Discussion in 'General Fitness' started by [email protected], Jan 9, 2006.

  1. Hi Runners,

    I am just starting out (again) to create a running habbit.

    (about me)
    26 years old. Slightly-moderately over weight. Last april with about 2
    months of practice i ran a 5K race in just under 29 minutes. After that
    i basically gave up on running for a while. Well, now im back at it and
    am seeking any sort of helpful hints, inspiration, advice, etc that you
    pro's can give me.

    Last week I purchased a fresh pair of shoes and they feel great. They
    make me want to run every time i see them. The last 4 days i ran 3
    times. Each was about 13-15 minutes of actuall running with a nice
    brisk walk at the end for at least a 10 mins. I clocked my route in my
    car to see how far i was going and it turn out i was only running 1.2
    miles :-( This kinda made me feel wimpy and i'm wondering what you all
    think.

    How far should i be going? Like i said, this is week 2. I'm not sure
    how hard to push myself. After about 1.2 miles i definately have felt
    the motions. At first my breathing is crazy, then i kinda settle down
    to a comfortable breath, then maybe a stomach cramp, then it goes away,
    then a feeling of "damn, this hurts" but then i overcome it and it
    feels great.

    How should I go about increasing my distance especially when my body
    says, "ok, its time to stop".
     
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  2. JRH2

    JRH2 Guest

    On 9 Jan 2006 11:42:26 -0800, [email protected] wrote:

    >
    >How should I go about increasing my distance especially when my body
    >says, "ok, its time to stop".


    Don't. Stay at that distance for a few weeks.
     
  3. SwStudio

    SwStudio Guest

    <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > Last week I purchased a fresh pair of shoes and they feel great. They
    > make me want to run every time i see them. The last 4 days i ran 3
    > times. Each was about 13-15 minutes of actuall running with a nice
    > brisk walk at the end for at least a 10 mins. I clocked my route in my
    > car to see how far i was going and it turn out i was only running 1.2
    > miles :-( This kinda made me feel wimpy and i'm wondering what you all
    > think.


    That's not bad at all - and if you keep following a regular schedule
    you will see relatively fast improvements quickly enough to keep
    you motivated for a long time. My first run was in May 2000 - I
    ran about half a mile and felt like vomiting. Within a year, I could
    run a marathon (26.2 miles) at a faster pace than I could run that
    first half mile. I just kept at it, and worked hard.

    > How far should i be going? Like i said, this is week 2. I'm not sure
    > how hard to push myself. After about 1.2 miles i definately have felt
    > the motions. At first my breathing is crazy, then i kinda settle down
    > to a comfortable breath, then maybe a stomach cramp, then it goes away,
    > then a feeling of "damn, this hurts" but then i overcome it and it
    > feels great.


    Try starting off quite slowly. Run at a pace that feels totally wimpy
    and far too easy. While you are doing that, concentrate on soft
    footstrikes and not overstriding - take little steps, three per second
    if you can manage it without feeling too awkward. Be patient and
    work at it. Remember to slow down, relax your shoulders and get
    into an easy breathing rhythm. Keep reminding yourself to slow down
    before the going seems to be getting tough. You want to avoid the
    feeling of difficulty increasing by the minute. Take walk breaks if
    you have to at first, but don't let it get too hard, especially at the
    beginning of the run.


    > How should I go about increasing my distance especially
    > when my body says, "ok, its time to stop".


    See the above. ;-) If you follow this advice, the result will be you
    spending longer each time at a level of exercise that helps you
    gain what you are looking for - endurance, improved aerobic
    capacity, all that good stuff. You want to be out there for 30 - 40
    minutes per session as a beginner. Right now you are doing 13-15
    minutes of running a little too hard, and then spending 10 minutes
    recovering with a walk - this is not "bad" for you, but it is not
    going to get you what you are looking for nearly as fast.

    cheers,
    --
    David Hirsh, director
    www.urbanburn.com - half marathon, full throttle!
    www.absolutelyaccurate.com - Hamilton's summer series!
     
  4. rick++

    rick++ Guest

    You are proceeding correctly.
    I may just take weeks longer than expected.
    After you have been running for a couple decades,
    it wont really matter whether it took two weeks
    or six weeks to build up to a continuous 20 minutes.

    The first goal would be run 20 minutes continuously
    and effortlessly. Then build up to and plateau at 30 minutes
    for the first six months. Then if you want more,
    work up to hour runs over the next six months.

    Its my observation that a lot of the annoying injuries
    happen when people are moving from 30 minutes
    to 60 minutes too fast. Its usually some part of
    the body that hasnt caught to the pounding of running,
    like the shins or bleeding bladder or digestive problems, etc.
     
  5. Ed Prochak

    Ed Prochak Guest

    [email protected] wrote:
    > Hi Runners,
    >
    > I am just starting out (again) to create a running habbit.
    >
    > (about me)
    > 26 years old. Slightly-moderately over weight. Last april with about 2
    > months of practice i ran a 5K race in just under 29 minutes. After that
    > i basically gave up on running for a while. Well, now im back at it and
    > am seeking any sort of helpful hints, inspiration, advice, etc that you
    > pro's can give me.


    I'm no pro, but one bit of advice based on what keeps me running year
    after year:

    Start a running journal.

    Nothing elaborate. Currently I'm using just a small looseleaf binder.
    Make it a habit at the end of each run. Put in the basic stuff: date
    (and maybe time of day) type of run and distance and/or time.

    When starting out, don't be concerned about your speed. Let the
    achievement be the time and distance you have devoted to your running.
    If you like and the mood strikes, record how your felt.
    Comments like:
    that run was tough OR glad I got out today, it really cleared my head.

    You might never look back at it, but the simple act of writing it all
    down will help.
    >
    > Last week I purchased a fresh pair of shoes and they feel great. They
    > make me want to run every time i see them. The last 4 days i ran 3
    > times. Each was about 13-15 minutes of actuall running with a nice
    > brisk walk at the end for at least a 10 mins. I clocked my route in my
    > car to see how far i was going and it turn out i was only running 1.2
    > miles :-( This kinda made me feel wimpy and i'm wondering what you all
    > think.


    A pace near 10-12minutes per mile at this point is great. Trust us, you
    will get better if you maintain your training. You are not a wimp, just
    a beginner. ANd you seem to be right on track.


    >
    > How should I go about increasing my distance especially when my body
    > says, "ok, its time to stop".


    Others covered this question.

    My other suggestion is to find someone to run with. The comradery and
    conversation will help. And if they are an experienced runner, they can
    give you specific advice about things like your running form. And they
    likely have a better sense of pae to help you learn not to run too
    fast.

    That's it. Go out there and enjoy the run.
    Ed
     
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