newbie issues

Discussion in 'The Bike Cafe' started by BigBoyTrike, Dec 28, 2005.

  1. BigBoyTrike

    BigBoyTrike New Member

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    Hello all,
    I've been working at this cycling thing off and on this past year. I also had been walking and jogging and entered three walk/run events. After completeing a half marathon (mostly walking) I decided I wanted to focus more on cycling (probably cuz I have such fond childhood memories of riding my bike everywhere!) but trying to find a suitable bike was tough. I am 6'3" and about 300lbs and trimming down after you pass 45 yrs old is proving to be a lot harder than it was in the past. my "happy weight" is between 250-260 (havent been there in 5yrs or more). Most bikes I tried to ride would make my "male areas" numb in less than an hour. So I set out to find a bike with a comfort saddle. I was shown a recumbent trike at a local bike shop and fell in love on a test ride.
    I purchased my Sun EZ-3 about 8 months ago. I opted to add 24in wheels inplace of the stock 20s and have since put about 500 miles on it.

    The main problem I have now is with my toes going numb. Ive tried tieing my shoes looser which has helped a good deal. I realize at my weight that I may be pressing on nerves in the back of my leg, but was curious if cycling shoes would help the problem. I'm just wearing my running shoes for now. I can stop for just a minute and the feeling returns and I can keep going. Would the stiffer soles of bike shoes minimize this problem?
     
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  2. Don Shipp

    Don Shipp New Member

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    Stiffer soles might well help, but that does not mean that cycling shoes are your only option. Before I went clipless, I rode in squash shoes and found them ideal.
    The most important consideration is that they are not too small. Don't just buy your size, don't just try them on in the shop. Get your feet measured, left and right, length and width, and make sure that what you buy are big enough. If the shop isn't helpful, find one that is.
     
  3. ToffoIsMe

    ToffoIsMe New Member

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    It could also be a vibration, or "road buzz" issue. I've noticed that my toes go a bit numb on extremely bumpy/rough streets because of the increase of vibration in my bike.
     
  4. BigBoyTrike

    BigBoyTrike New Member

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    I dont think its a vibration issue because I tend to stay away from the rough surface roads if at all possible. I also dont want to take a chance on bending a rim or popping a tube since I know I'm near the bikes designed weight limit.

    I actually tried a pair of my work shoes today which are qiute bit stiffer than my running shoes. I think it did help but I wont be able to continue using them since they weigh about half a ton.
    thanx for the input, I'll be shopping around to see what I can find.
     
  5. gclark8

    gclark8 New Member

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    maybe some larger platform pedals, like the bmx ones, you can put strapless toe clips on some of those.
     
  6. mrhemby

    mrhemby New Member

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    I am new here but I have been a LARGE rider for a great many years. I am 6'4" and 400lbs and I have experienced the same problem when I got back into riding again. It seemed to go away after I adjusted my foot position and I got some good riding shoes. I use 'clip less' pedals and MTB shoes with a wide design in the front area to accommodate my large feet. My problem seemed to be the result of placing all of the pressure on the ball of the foot during the pedal stroke. This differs from walking or running in that you put no force onto the heel of the foot on the bike. Good shoes and proper foot position will do wonders for your comfort. For me the clips forced me to use 'correct' foot position and helped to reduce other comfort issues I was having.

    I hope that this helps out.
     
  7. BigBoyTrike

    BigBoyTrike New Member

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    thanx once again...forums are such great things...it is nice to know there are some other "big fellas" out there. With me there is no shortage of enthusiasm to get out and exercise but I fall short on my bad eating habits.

    My wife recently gave me John Bingham's first book "The Courage to Start". In it he states how he used to be a very overweight couch potato and transformed himself into a marathon runner. Albeit not a fast one, which is how he garnered his nickname of "The Penguin".
    I nhis book he states that he had to adopt the attitude that food was "fuel for the body and not comfort for thr soul". This statement struck me as very profound, and since I am also a car enthusiast, I formulated my own theory.

    I only use good quality, high octane gasoline in my car because I want the best performance from it. Since I am the engine on my bike, then I should do the same for myself. Maybe this and some further inspiration from the accomplishments of those here will see excellent progress this year.

    here's to the wonderful symbiotic relationship between man and machine:cool:
     
  8. FORDGT40

    FORDGT40 New Member

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    Hey Bad Boy,

    A little OT, but that quote you gave was inspiring. I am actually the complete opposite of you. Born with a fast metabolism i have been underweight most of my life and worked my butt off to get to a comfortable 75kg (which has since been lost). But about the fuel quote, that is so right. Im a terrible eater, i love my take-aways, but i also like to exercise a lot so i really know when I need to eat right. Good luck and I Cant wait to watch your progress.

    Billy

    PS From a physiology point of view, long rides are the best thing for weight loss, get a cheap heart rate monitor and maintain 60-70% heart rate max (HRmax = 220-age) for periods exceeding 30min for best results. At this workload the greater proportion of your energy will be derived from fat stores (about 80%), rather than glycogen. but only AFTER 30min.
     
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