Newbie needs 2006 Giant FCR-1 buying advice

Discussion in 'Bike buying advice' started by charlisity, Jul 10, 2006.

  1. charlisity

    charlisity New Member

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    2006 Giant FCR-1
    http://www.giant-bicycle.com/us/030.000.000/030.000.006.asp?model=11327

    Here is link for its XERO wheels:
    http://www.xerowheel.com/prod_detail.asp?btn=2&id=1&id2=19&pid=20

    I am looking into this bike but I have some newbie questions about it. I have some information but I'm so new at this that I just see jiberish. It doesn't mean anything to me.

    Is it geared like a road bike or more like a mountain bike?

    Somebody posted here that you should use steel frames and stay away from aluminum/carbon if you were over 160lbs. Nobody refuted that post in the few days I checked, so it left me wondering if the FCR1 was the best choice for my 6' and 210lb body.

    Those 20-spoke wheels look nice but can they hold up to city commuting? No bunny hops or curb dismounting but certainly some rough asphalt roads.

    I have a very steep but very short climb on my way home and I have to stand and use the handle bar extensions to get up it. Would those wheels handle that sideways pressure?


    Thanks for the help.

    By the way, nice forum you have going here.
     
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  2. biketrue

    biketrue New Member

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    This bike will definately hold up just fine for you. An aluminum or carbon fiber will hold out just fine for a 210 lb. person. I did not see the post where someone recomendend steel for individuals over 160 lbs., but that is in no way true. A superlight carbon bike might not be able to handle the wieght, and wheels and pedals can often carry limitations. The FCR-1 will hold up just fine; I have sold them to people heavier than you.

    As far as the ride, you should notice a ride very similar to that of a road bike. The FCR has road "style" components, a road fork, road geometry and road wheels. The only thing missing is a drop handlebar. If you are looking for exercise and some longer rides, this is the bike for you. If comfort and a short commute suit you better, then you may want to look at something like a Cannondale Adventure 400. As you said you will be on some uneven roads, an elastomer, or bushing style, suspension fork may help to smooth things out.

    A good bike shop should be able to suggest the best bike for your riding. Hope you find the right bike for you.
     
  3. gclark8

    gclark8 New Member

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    I agree with all the above, the Giant FCR-1 is a good choice. I use flat bars on both my bikes, I am over 55 and it gives me better low speed control and visability.

    The wheels with a low spoke count can be a problem. It may be wise to opt for a pair of wheels with more spokes and better tyres. On my try bike I use 32 spoke Ultegra Hubs with Deep-V Rims and 23mm Conti Ultra Gator Skin Tyres for training and 20 spoke for Sunday best. :cool:
     
  4. RickF

    RickF New Member

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    There is a poster on this forum that claims that aluminum and carbon frames are too fragile and always recommends steel frames. I take him with a grain of salt. I was 265 pounds when I started riding an aluminum frame bike with 32 spoke wheels. After about 2000 miles I am 205 pounds (OK, it is still too much, but I am going in the right direction). I have never had a problem with the bike or wheels. I have never had a flat, and the wheels have never gone out of true.

    Magnus Backstedt is 198 pounds and rides a Bianchi FG Lite Carbon. I have not seen it fail under his weight.
     
  5. thomas_cho

    thomas_cho New Member

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    Thats very good encouragement for me ... (re: weight loss). Keep at it!
     
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