newbie question about injuries

Discussion in 'General Fitness' started by Snowden22, Sep 25, 2003.

  1. BTW, 3 miles is not an effort for anyone, and even I after years of smoking 3 packs of cigs a day,
    being 50lbs overweight, and having never ran at all in my life (except from the cops) even I could
    do 3 miles without taking a whole day off to recover.
     


  2. Haselden

    Haselden Guest

    "penny periods" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > BTW, 3 miles is not an effort for anyone, and even I after years of smoking 3 packs of cigs a day,
    > being 50lbs overweight, and having never ran at all in my life (except from the cops) even I could
    > do 3 miles without taking a whole day off to recover.

    I ain't buying it. It's the extra 50 pounds that causes me to doubt the veracity of your comments.
    That's a big load on legs that have never engaged in continuous running workouts. First day, no
    problem, 2 or 3 or 4 days down the road ...no problem. But somewhere around the 30 mile tally
    unconditioned legs working a 50lb overweight body need a break. Yours did too.

    Hey, we were all beginners at some point and most of us here that were overweight at that point know
    the reality of running daily at the start of a program.
     
  3. Doug Freese

    Doug Freese Guest

    penny periods wrote:

    > BTW, 3 miles is not an effort for anyone, and even I after years of smoking 3 packs of cigs a day,
    > being 50lbs overweight, and having never ran at all in my life (except from the cops) even I could
    > do 3 miles without taking a whole day off to recover.

    Please don't get dumb like crazy Bill(oh shit, I'll bet this is ugly Bill under one of his trolling
    aliases) and generalize what worked for you should work for the next person. When I first started
    running a 1/2 mile was all I could tolerate and there are many others on this group that had the
    same experiences. Maybe those frequent escapes from the police was actually training. :)

    When three or less miles is an effort for someone then a rest day between is not just valid but
    smart. You have the rest of your life to run so why hurry into an injury. Congrats on your rapid
    start but you ain't everyone so stow the macho attitude.

    --
    Doug Freese [email protected]
     
  4. On Thu, 25 Sep 2003 23:55:12 GMT, Doug Freese <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Please don't get dumb like crazy Bill(oh shit, I'll bet this is ugly Bill under one of his trolling
    >aliases) and generalize what worked for you should work for the next person.

    It'll work for anyone you fat pig.

    >hen I first started running a 1/2 mile was all I could tolerate

    Try it on two legs instead of all fours next time.

    >nd there are many others on this group that had the same experiences. Maybe those frequent escapes
    >from the police was actually training. :)
    >

    Who said I escaped?

    >When three or less miles is an effort for someone then a rest day between is not just valid but
    >smart. You have the rest of your life to run so why hurry into an injury. Congrats on your rapid
    >start but you ain't everyone so stow the macho attitude.

    BS, you're a whimp.
     
  5. Steve Hansen

    Steve Hansen Guest

    Snowden22 wrote:

    > This is getting frustrating. After every run I end up trying to investigate a new pain in my legs.
    > They all seem to go away after a day or two, but I'm constantly taking a day or two off or "taking
    > it easy." Is it common to get to this point after a couple of months?

    Yes. You are using muscles and tendons in new ways, and with high repetitions. That takes
    conditioning. ANY pain in a joint or tendon needs time to heal, before you repeat/continue the
    exercise that caused it.

    > Thanks for any advice you folks have for me. One other question - has anybody switched from
    > morning running to evening running and improved their injury situation? I'm wondering if running
    > first thing in the morning is causing problems.

    The human body is less flexible (and more easily injured) just after awakening than it is after
    several hours of moving and stretching.

    Read a book: Joe Ellis, D.P.M., (1994) "Running injury free". Rodale Press. Emmaus, PA. ISBN
    0-87596-221-11.
     
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