Newbie Question: Greasing a Seatpost

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Webby, Mar 9, 2003.

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  1. Webby

    Webby Guest

    Hi all,

    Can somebody please explain to me what "greasing a seat post" means and why do you do it?

    Many thanks

    Webby

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  2. Ken

    Ken Guest

    [email protected] (Webby) wrote in news:[email protected]:
    > Can somebody please explain to me what "greasing a seat post" means and why do you do it?

    Just wipe a thin coat of grease onto the seat post before inserting it into your frame. Any type of
    mechanical grease will do; I use the same stuff I use on my bearings. White lithium auto grease is
    always popular.

    The grease prevents corrosion, which can be a big problem, especially if the two parts are different
    types of metals (steel frame and aluminum seatpost, etc).

    Ken

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  3. Tell

    Tell New Member

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    Okay, here we go again, the oldest mistake in engineering is greasing things that should hold together by friction.
    For seat-posts, all kinds of threads, stems and handlebars use an anti-seize compound, usually copper-based. The most widely available is made by CRC. Grease is for bearings and other surfaces which should glide against each other.
    Let your saddle stay up!
    Tell
     
  4. Peter Cole

    Peter Cole Guest

    "Tell" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >
    > Okay, here we go again, the oldest mistake in engineering is greasing things that should hold
    > together by friction. For seat-posts, all kinds of threads, stems and handlebars use an anti-seize
    > compound, usually copper-based. The most widely available is made by CRC. Grease is for bearings
    > and other surfaces which should glide against each other. Let your saddle stay up! Tell

    Anti-seize is a lubricant, just one that typically uses powdered metal to prevent displacement by
    heat and static loads. The problem with seatposts is corrosion, the products of aluminum corrosion
    causing the seatpost to effectively swell and lock itself in place. Greased seatposts don't slip if
    tight, loose ones will, greased or dry.
     
  5. Jim Adney

    Jim Adney Guest

    On 10 Mar 2003 09:31:22 +1050 Tell <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Okay, here we go again, the oldest mistake in engineering is greasing things that should hold
    >together by friction. For seat-posts, all kinds of threads, stems and handlebars use an anti-seize
    >compound, usually copper-based. The most widely available is made by CRC. Grease is for bearings
    >and other surfaces which should glide against each other. Let your saddle stay up!

    Grease will work fine, as will anti-seize. While this is not a moving part and does not require
    lubrication, neither is it a high pressure application where galling is a problem.

    A seat tube that is cylindrical and is mated to the proper sized seat post will not slip even if it
    is greased, while a seat tube that is out of round and fit to an undersized post will probably slip
    even if dry.

    The purpose of whatever you put in there is to exclude water and oxygen to prevent corrosion. Most
    greases and anti-seizes will do this just fine. The anti-seize DOES have a slight advantage on the
    threads of the seat post bolt, however, where the pressures can be higher.

    -
    -----------------------------------------------
    Jim Adney [email protected] Madison, WI 53711 USA
    -----------------------------------------------
     
  6. Pete Biggs

    Pete Biggs Guest

    Jim Adney wrote:

    > The anti-seize DOES have a slight advantage on the threads of the seat post bolt, however, where
    > the pressures can be higher.

    Is that to prevent seizing or to enable the bolt to be tightened further?

    ~PB
     
  7. In article <[email protected]>, Webby <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >Can somebody please explain to me what "greasing a seat post" means and why do you do it?

    Most places where you have two metal parts touching each other, and wish to be able to take them
    apart again (ever) then some kind of lubrication is a good idea. Seatposts and stems are important
    to lubricate because water or sweat can penetrate the area very easily, and stem or seatpost
    extraction can be laborious if highly corroded. I usually put a thin film of grease on the seatpost
    and then liberally grease the inside of the seat tube as far down as my finger can reach. If you
    slather too much on the post it will be wiped off as you insert it. For stems I take it all apart
    and grease every part that touches anything (unless it's attached to a carbon-fiber part). Stems
    often have a big gap in the steer tube, I like it to be sealed with grease.

    --Paul
     
  8. Peter Cole

    Peter Cole Guest

    "Paul Southworth" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:vlpba.33382$A%[email protected]...
    > In article <9f4efdc9.03030[email protected]>, Webby <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > >Can somebody please explain to me what "greasing a seat post" means and why do you do it?
    >
    > Most places where you have two metal parts touching each other, and wish to be able to take them
    > apart again (ever) then some kind of lubrication is a good idea. Seatposts and stems are important
    > to lubricate because water or sweat can penetrate the area very easily, and stem or seatpost
    > extraction can be laborious if highly corroded.
    >
    > Stems often have a big gap in the steer tube, I like it to be sealed with grease.

    As Jobst often points out, stems are particularly vulnerable to corrosion (ask me how I know) since
    the small movements creates a pumping action that will mix the water with grease over time. The
    consequence is that stems should be periodically removed, cleaned and regreased.
     
  9. David Kunz

    David Kunz Guest

    Ken wrote:
    > [email protected] (Webby) wrote in news:[email protected]:
    >
    >>Can somebody please explain to me what "greasing a seat post" means and why do you do it?
    >
    >
    > Just wipe a thin coat of grease onto the seat post before inserting it into your frame. Any type
    > of mechanical grease will do; I use the same stuff I use on my bearings. White lithium auto grease
    > is always popular.
    >
    > The grease prevents corrosion, which can be a big problem, especially if the two parts are
    > different types of metals (steel frame and aluminum seatpost, etc).
    >

    It also keeps it from creaking when you shift your weight. Most "Bottom Bracket" creaks are the
    seat post :).

    David
     
  10. Jim Adney

    Jim Adney Guest

    On Tue, 11 Mar 2003 14:33:52 -0000 "Pete Biggs" <pLime{remove_fruit}@biggs.tc> wrote:

    >Jim Adney wrote:
    >
    >> The anti-seize DOES have a slight advantage on the threads of the seat post bolt, however, where
    >> the pressures can be higher.
    >
    >Is that to prevent seizing or to enable the bolt to be tightened further?

    Well, I suppose both, but I should add that if the seat tube is reamed properly, and if the seat
    post is a proper fit, then it will not be necessary to tighten this bolt very hard. If you find that
    you can't get your seat binder bolt tight enough then there is probably a fit problem that you
    should get fixed.

    -
    -----------------------------------------------
    Jim Adney [email protected] Madison, WI 53711 USA
    -----------------------------------------------
     
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