Newbie question re: Trainers

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by teknofyle, Oct 5, 2004.

  1. teknofyle

    teknofyle Guest

    I am new to cycling, having arrived at the sport after running for years
    (now with a herniated disc) and my Doctor suggesting I at least limit my
    running miles. I have secured a road bike, as I live in an area with some
    great bike paths. But as the daylight grows shorter, I would like to have
    the option to get in a workout at night. My local shop has a ~$300 trainer
    by Cycle Ops. Can someone explain to me what exactly this trainer (or one
    like it) does for that price? Their website is not very helpful--it just
    says "resistance level varies automatically based on your cadence and wheel
    speed." Does this mean the trainer has pre-programmed rides on it? You can
    see it here:

    http://www.cycle-ops.com/products/fluidsquared.htm

    I'm sure there are many opinions on this, but are there different types that
    are better? I can see where getting on a trainer that only has one speed
    would be a bore, so any light you all can shed on how they work would be
    appreciated.

    TIA to anyone having the patience to respond.
     
    Tags:


  2. gds

    gds Guest

    "teknofyle" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > I am new to cycling, having arrived at the sport after running for years
    > (now with a herniated disc) and my Doctor suggesting I at least limit my
    > running miles. I have secured a road bike, as I live in an area with some
    > great bike paths. But as the daylight grows shorter, I would like to have
    > the option to get in a workout at night. My local shop has a ~$300 trainer
    > by Cycle Ops. Can someone explain to me what exactly this trainer (or one
    > like it) does for that price? Their website is not very helpful--it just
    > says "resistance level varies automatically based on your cadence and wheel
    > speed." Does this mean the trainer has pre-programmed rides on it? You can
    > see it here:
    >
    > http://www.cycle-ops.com/products/fluidsquared.htm
    >
    > I'm sure there are many opinions on this, but are there different types that
    > are better? I can see where getting on a trainer that only has one speed
    > would be a bore, so any light you all can shed on how they work would be
    > appreciated.
    >
    > TIA to anyone having the patience to respond.


    No there are no pre programmed rides. It simply means that you can
    shift your gears to adjust resisstance AND there is also a resistance
    change that relates to how fast your wheel is spinning.

    I have an old Cycle Ops trainer that Iused for a while and it now sits
    idle.
    Basically what you have withthis is an exercycle. The
    difference/improvement is that it will be your road bike and its fit.

    Here is my personal opinion. If you are not a racer and do not have to
    maintain cycle specific fitness it will be hard to stick to a trainer
    schedule. It is really boring. So, when I raced I did it. Now I
    wouldn't dream of it. At least not as the major component of my
    training. I simply find other things to stay fit. For me, hiking and
    walking work great when the weather/darkness don't allow cycling.
     
  3. Mike Schwab

    Mike Schwab Guest

    I would suggest a Cateye Opticube for $40 headlight,
    2 LED tailights of different designs for 20-30,
    winter gear as needed for local conditions, suggested sites are
    http://www.bikewinter.org
    http://www.icebike.org
    Kind of late to start training for the 2005 race at
    http://www.alaskaultrasport.com/ but you can get ready for 2006.

    teknofyle wrote:
    >
    > I am new to cycling, having arrived at the sport after running for years
    > (now with a herniated disc) and my Doctor suggesting I at least limit my
    > running miles. I have secured a road bike, as I live in an area with some
    > great bike paths. But as the daylight grows shorter, I would like to have
    > the option to get in a workout at night. My local shop has a ~$300 trainer
    > by Cycle Ops. Can someone explain to me what exactly this trainer (or one
    > like it) does for that price? Their website is not very helpful--it just
    > says "resistance level varies automatically based on your cadence and wheel
    > speed." Does this mean the trainer has pre-programmed rides on it? You can
    > see it here:
    >
    > http://www.cycle-ops.com/products/fluidsquared.htm
    >
    > I'm sure there are many opinions on this, but are there different types that
    > are better? I can see where getting on a trainer that only has one speed
    > would be a bore, so any light you all can shed on how they work would be
    > appreciated.
    >
    > TIA to anyone having the patience to respond.
     
  4. Julie

    Julie Guest

    "teknofyle" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > I am new to cycling, having arrived at the sport after running for years
    > (now with a herniated disc) and my Doctor suggesting I at least limit my
    > running miles. I have secured a road bike, as I live in an area with some
    > great bike paths. But as the daylight grows shorter, I would like to have
    > the option to get in a workout at night. My local shop has a ~$300 trainer
    > by Cycle Ops. Can someone explain to me what exactly this trainer (or one
    > like it) does for that price? Their website is not very helpful--it just
    > says "resistance level varies automatically based on your cadence and wheel
    > speed." Does this mean the trainer has pre-programmed rides on it? You can
    > see it here:
    >
    > http://www.cycle-ops.com/products/fluidsquared.htm
    >
    > I'm sure there are many opinions on this, but are there different types that
    > are better? I can see where getting on a trainer that only has one speed
    > would be a bore, so any light you all can shed on how they work would be
    > appreciated.
    >
    > TIA to anyone having the patience to respond.

    Hi,
    I too am looking at the Cycle Ops II fluid filled trainer. I have
    used the Blackburn Magnetic trainer for 3 years and found it to be a
    good trainer, but noisy. The fluid filled trainers are virtually
    silent. My brother has used the Cycle Ops II for 2 seasons and loves
    it. He did a lot of research before he bought it and he's a very
    serious biker and an engineer, so I pretty much am ready to go with
    his choice. (I bought my magnetic the season before). Some things to
    consider before buying a trainer: Will it accomodate your particular
    wheel size? (since you have a road bike, most likely it will) Do you
    plan to watch TV or listen to music? Then you need a fluid filled
    for sure, in my opinion. I finally started using headphones on my TV
    because the magnetic trainer is so loud. My husband can hear the
    trainer noise upstairs!

    I don't think the cycle ops you're looking at has Programmed rides.
    There are video tapes/ DVD's available for that sort of workout. I
    watch TV and use the commercials for "intervals" of "Climbing in a
    high gear", spinning like a maniac etc.

    You can always use your bikes gears to vary the resistance of any
    trainer, even the inexpensive magnetic ones.

    A bit of advice: buy a front wheel block/ prop thing of some type, as
    your rear wheel will be raised a couple of inches. I like the Cycle
    ops one because it has 3 different height choices. I used 2X4's the
    first year. There is also a handy book rack that attaches to the
    handlebars, I think Blackburn makes that. If you tend to sweat
    profusely, you may want to buy a fancy cloth bib thing for your bike,
    or lay a towel over your bars. I put my bike and trainer on top of a
    plastic runner to protect my carpet. If your chain is pretty dirty,
    it is possible for stuff to "fling" off and get on your floor or walls
    too.

    I have a love hate relationship with my trainer. It keeps me "in the
    saddle" and good cardio, but it can get pretty boring. I hate that
    it's "inside" and not out on the road though,but I live in Iowa
    winters, and am lucky to get a few weekend rides a month during the
    cold season.

    Just a few thoughts. I think I'm ready to by the Cycle Ops II also.
    Cheers.
    Cheers-
     
  5. Peter Cole

    Peter Cole Guest

    "Julie" <[email protected]> wrote
    > I too am looking at the Cycle Ops II fluid filled trainer. I have
    > used the Blackburn Magnetic trainer for 3 years and found it to be a
    > good trainer, but noisy. The fluid filled trainers are virtually
    > silent.


    > Do you
    > plan to watch TV or listen to music? Then you need a fluid filled
    > for sure, in my opinion. I finally started using headphones on my TV
    > because the magnetic trainer is so loud. My husband can hear the
    > trainer noise upstairs!


    I'm surprised, I also have the Blackburn magnetic, and it's virtually
    silent. Magnetic resistance trainers have no contacting parts (except tire
    to drive cylinder, obviously), the only moving part inside the unit is an
    aluminum disk attached to the spindle, which is smooth (at least in mine),
    with air gaps between it and the permanent magnets (stationary). I'm
    wondering if you have a defective unit. Trainers are so deadly boring, I
    rarely use ours, but my wife does, always while watching TV, so noise, if
    there were any, would be a problem.

    My trainer did start making noise shortly after I got it. Upon disassembly,
    I found a set screw had loosened, permitting the rotating disk to rub on
    the stationary magnets. I tightened it and it has been fine (and quiet)
    since.

    My concern with fluid trainers is that any rotating seal will eventually
    wear and start to leak. I have no idea if that will take 1,000 years with
    the Cycle Ops, but leaks have been a problem with this type of unit. Mag
    trainers just seem more bomb proof.
     
  6. On Wed, 06 Oct 2004 12:30:52 GMT, "Peter Cole"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I'm surprised, I also have the Blackburn magnetic, and it's virtually
    >silent. Magnetic resistance trainers have no contacting parts (except tire
    >to drive cylinder, obviously), the only moving part inside the unit is an
    >aluminum disk attached to the spindle, which is smooth (at least in mine),
    >with air gaps between it and the permanent magnets (stationary). I'm
    >wondering if you have a defective unit. Trainers are so deadly boring, I
    >rarely use ours, but my wife does, always while watching TV, so noise, if
    >there were any, would be a problem.


    Have to agree. OTOH, after using wind trainers for years, my idea of
    silence is warped. If the dog three doors down doesn't start to howl,
    its quiet.

    Anyone using a Giant spin bike? We are getting one this week to use
    inside. The bikes are in the garage and can be ridden most of the
    time, but we got the spin bike to have one smaller footprint for both
    of us. Wondering what one of those sounds like at 100 plus rpm.

    Curtis L. Russell
    Odenton, MD (USA)
    Just someone on two wheels...
     
  7. SlowRider

    SlowRider Guest

    I bought a trainer in 2001 and I use it a LOT over the winter. I am
    by no means a racer. It is a great way to get a light-to-moderate
    workout with little hassle. I use mine to build endurance in an
    environment where I'm not likely to over-exert. If I want a nice,
    low-key workout for an hour or two, I'll pop a tape in the VCR
    (old-fashioned, I know) and just start pedaling. It's even more fun
    if I put in tapes of the TDF or Giro d'Italia.

    So far the longest "ride" I've done on my trainer is about 4 hours.
    When I do these long workouts, I plan it as if I'm going on a real
    ride -- sports drink, bananas, etc.

    I'm probably also one of the few people who actually likes using the
    CyclOps workout video to do some quick interval training. They do
    "pyramid" intervals, which are good to know about.

    The trainer also gives you an opportunity to do single-leg drills that
    are great if you're going clipless and want to improve your stroke.
    Learn to pedal one-legged in the comfort and safety of your own home,
    then you can do it on the road without embarrasing yourself!

    I used to have an exercise bike, and the trainer is much, much more
    enjoyable. The one I bought is a wind trainer, so I usually wear
    earplugs and crank the TV up. Not the most efficient arrangement, but
    it works for me.

    (BTW, I don't work for CyclOps, although perhaps they should pay me
    for the free advertising. Other trainers are probably just as good,
    but the CyclOps is the only one I've tried.)

    JR
     
  8. Roger Zoul

    Roger Zoul Guest

    Curtis L. Russell wrote:
    || On Wed, 06 Oct 2004 12:30:52 GMT, "Peter Cole"
    || <[email protected]> wrote:
    ||
    ||| I'm surprised, I also have the Blackburn magnetic, and it's
    ||| virtually silent. Magnetic resistance trainers have no contacting
    ||| parts (except tire to drive cylinder, obviously), the only moving
    ||| part inside the unit is an aluminum disk attached to the spindle,
    ||| which is smooth (at least in mine), with air gaps between it and
    ||| the permanent magnets (stationary). I'm wondering if you have a
    ||| defective unit. Trainers are so deadly boring, I rarely use ours,
    ||| but my wife does, always while watching TV, so noise, if there were
    ||| any, would be a problem.
    ||
    || Have to agree. OTOH, after using wind trainers for years, my idea of
    || silence is warped. If the dog three doors down doesn't start to howl,
    || its quiet.
    ||
    || Anyone using a Giant spin bike? We are getting one this week to use
    || inside. The bikes are in the garage and can be ridden most of the
    || time, but we got the spin bike to have one smaller footprint for both
    || of us. Wondering what one of those sounds like at 100 plus rpm.

    What is a Giant spin bike?
     
  9. Zoot Katz

    Zoot Katz Guest

    Wed, 6 Oct 2004 22:35:01 -0400, <[email protected]>,
    "Roger Zoul" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    >What is a Giant spin bike?


    A stationary pedal operated exercise device branded by Giant, the
    bicycling related products company.
    --
    zk
     
  10. Roger Zoul

    Roger Zoul Guest

    Zoot Katz wrote:
    || Wed, 6 Oct 2004 22:35:01 -0400, <[email protected]>,
    || "Roger Zoul" <[email protected]> wrote:
    ||
    |||
    ||| What is a Giant spin bike?
    ||
    || A stationary pedal operated exercise device branded by Giant, the
    || bicycling related products company.

    That sounds like a typical stationary bike. Why the use of the word "spin"?
     
  11. Zoot Katz

    Zoot Katz Guest

    Thu, 7 Oct 2004 13:51:02 -0400, <[email protected]>,
    "Roger Zoul" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >That sounds like a typical stationary bike. Why the use of the word "spin"?


    Why? tsk tsk tsk Spinning ® is "The ultimate ride for body and mind".
    Besides we can't keep selling the SOS every year so we have to spin it
    differently. Spinning ® requires special licensed gloves and shorts
    and hats and sweat bands and you've got to get the tapes and videos
    and check out the awesome eight-week weight loss program and go to the
    meetings so maybe you too can qualify to become a certified Spinning ®
    instructor.

    http://www.spinning.com/
    --
    zk
     
  12. On Thu, 7 Oct 2004 13:51:02 -0400, "Roger Zoul"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >That sounds like a typical stationary bike. Why the use of the word "spin"?


    The primary difference is that you can set up a spin bike the same as
    a regular road bike. Standard bike seat, SPD pedals, same position.
    The advantage if you have more than one using the bike is that they
    are designed for spin classes, which means that you can set it up for
    each rider and then quickly put it back at that rider's settings.

    All other types of stationery bikes had all or some of the following:
    non-standard handlebar positions, non-standard (and cheap) pedal
    systems, fat and flat bike seats, difficult to change position.

    We have the mag trainers in the garage where there is more room. On
    some days, though, it is too cold to use for a quick and easy 20-30
    minutes. So we spent a bit and got a bike that lets either of us get
    on and ride the bike in a standard position late at night.

    I notice that the spinning label seems to bother some - can't worry
    about people that make the trivial a major issue in their life.

    FWIW, I've since found that they aren't that loud, although not as
    quiet as the mag trainer. Surprising, since they use a pressure brake
    on the fly wheel for resistance - I would have expected more noise.

    Curtis L. Russell
    Odenton, MD (USA)
    Just someone on two wheels...
     
  13. Zoot Katz

    Zoot Katz Guest

    Thu, 07 Oct 2004 15:58:08 -0400,
    <[email protected]>, Curtis L. Russell
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    >I notice that the spinning label seems to bother some - can't worry
    >about people that make the trivial a major issue in their life.


    You mean the Spinning ® label.
    It's like Starbucks trademarking "christmas blend".
    A trivial issue, indeed, when we have to buy back our language from
    multi-national corporations.
    --
    zk
     
  14. Mike Kruger

    Mike Kruger Guest

    "Zoot Katz" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > <[email protected]>, Curtis L. Russell
    > >
    > >I notice that the spinning label seems to bother some - can't worry
    > >about people that make the trivial a major issue in their life.

    >
    > You mean the Spinning ® label.
    > It's like Starbucks trademarking "christmas blend".
    > A trivial issue, indeed, when we have to buy back our language from
    > multi-national corporations.


    I'm going to xerox your e-mail and fed-ex it to my congressman to see if he
    can come up with some band-aid solution.

    (my point: the language goes both ways)
     
  15. Zoot Katz

    Zoot Katz Guest

    Sat, 9 Oct 2004 11:11:48 -0500,
    <[email protected]>, "Mike Kruger"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >> >I notice that the spinning label seems to bother some - can't worry
    >> >about people that make the trivial a major issue in their life.

    >>
    >> You mean the Spinning ® label.
    >> It's like Starbucks trademarking "christmas blend".
    >> A trivial issue, indeed, when we have to buy back our language from
    >> multi-national corporations.

    >
    >I'm going to xerox your e-mail and fed-ex it to my congressman to see if he
    >can come up with some band-aid solution.
    >
    >(my point: the language goes both ways)


    Photocopies these days are made on machines other than Xerox. That
    word didn't exist in our language until Xerox paid people to invent
    it. Xerox would be entitled because they invented the word, the same
    as Kleenex, Windex or Spam. Those words have entered the vernacular
    and have become useful. Their use outside the vernacular remains
    tightly constrained by trademark laws.

    It's a different situation when somebody appropriates and trademarks
    words like "spinning" or "entrepreneur". Words that were already in
    our language. "You're fired" and "fair and balanced" are trademarked.
    As is "the brilliance of common sense", words and phrases that have
    meaning beyond the trademark owners' limited application.

    Phrases such as "mickey mouse", "breakfast of champions" or "heartbeat
    of america" have been painted into a corner by advertising and
    marketing by mass media for a consumer culture and then held ransom by
    the trademarks owners' and their fleet of lawyers. - - - hired with
    the royalties paid, for using our own language. It's ludicrous.

    It's a different situation again when we adopt acronyms such as LASER
    and RADAR. No one, AFAIK, is required to pay licensing fees to use
    those words for describing their product that performs those
    functions. Unlike Unix.

    I'm not sure where I'm going with this but it seems to be already be a
    given that yours or mine DNA can be copyrighted by someone else.
    --
    zk
     
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