Newbie Questions

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by eagleeye1200, Feb 26, 2005.

  1. eagleeye1200

    eagleeye1200 Guest

    Hello to all;

    Want to upgrade my riding and my bicycle this spring. I have a Specialized
    Hard Rock Sport that I use for errands around town and light trail riding
    and I love this bike. I also have an older model church yard-sale Matsuishi
    10 speed that I use for longer road rides. This is the bike I want to
    upgrade. I usually use this bike for 10-15 mile rides a couple times a week
    for fun and exercise and want to upgrade.

    I hope to extend the road rides to 20-25 miles or so and would like some
    recommendations on a bike. I am about 5'11 210 lbs, so I need something
    that is strong enough and comfortable enough for someone my size. Not into
    racing, just riding to get a little sweat and have some fun.

    Would like to spend no more than $500-$600 and get something that I am not
    going to want to upgrade again.

    New to this group, so please point me in the right direction if there is a
    bette place to post or a web site where I could find some useful info in
    making my decision.


    thanks
     
    Tags:


  2. "eagleeye1200" wrote:
    > Want to upgrade my riding and my bicycle this spring.


    > I also have an older model church yard-sale Matsuishi
    > 10 speed that I use for longer road rides. This is the bike I want to
    > upgrade. I usually use this bike for 10-15 mile rides a couple times a
    > week
    > for fun and exercise and want to upgrade.
    >
    > I hope to extend the road rides to 20-25 miles or so and would like some
    > recommendations on a bike. I am about 5'11 210 lbs, so I need something
    > that is strong enough and comfortable enough for someone my size. Not
    > into
    > racing, just riding to get a little sweat and have some fun.
    >
    > Would like to spend no more than $500-$600 and get something that I am not
    > going to want to upgrade again.


    I'm a little confused by your wording. Do you want to upgrade or replace the
    "Matsuishi?" Upgrade generally means making changes to an existing bike.

    If you're already doing 10-15 mile rides on that bike, I don't see why you
    can't do 20-25 miles. What specifically don't you like about the bike? What
    do you want from a new bike that this one can't deliver? There may be good
    reasons for switching to a different bike, but you have to give us more
    info.

    See:
    http://www.sbraweb.org/choose.htm

    Art Harris
     
  3. Gooserider

    Gooserider Guest

    "eagleeye1200" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Hello to all;
    >
    > Want to upgrade my riding and my bicycle this spring. I have a

    Specialized
    > Hard Rock Sport that I use for errands around town and light trail riding
    > and I love this bike. I also have an older model church yard-sale

    Matsuishi
    > 10 speed that I use for longer road rides. This is the bike I want to
    > upgrade. I usually use this bike for 10-15 mile rides a couple times a

    week
    > for fun and exercise and want to upgrade.
    >
    > I hope to extend the road rides to 20-25 miles or so and would like some
    > recommendations on a bike. I am about 5'11 210 lbs, so I need something
    > that is strong enough and comfortable enough for someone my size. Not

    into
    > racing, just riding to get a little sweat and have some fun.
    >
    > Would like to spend no more than $500-$600 and get something that I am not
    > going to want to upgrade again.
    >
    >

    If you want to spend $600 on a new bike you have a lot of choices. I think
    Trek, Bianchi, Cannondale, Giant, and the other big makers all have entry
    level road bikes at that price point. Of course, if you know what you want
    and what size you need, you can do very well on eBay.
     
  4. jj

    jj Guest

    On Sun, 27 Feb 2005 03:31:01 GMT, "Gooserider" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >If you want to spend $600 on a new bike you have a lot of choices. I think
    >Trek, Bianchi, Cannondale, Giant, and the other big makers all have entry
    >level road bikes at that price point. Of course, if you know what you want
    >and what size you need, you can do very well on eBay.
    >


    Wait until Oct/Nov you can probably get a Trek 1200 '05 with 105 components
    for about 600-700 bucks.

    jj
     
  5. C A III A

    C A III A Guest

    "jj" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > On Sun, 27 Feb 2005 03:31:01 GMT, "Gooserider" <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    >>If you want to spend $600 on a new bike you have a lot of choices. I think
    >>Trek, Bianchi, Cannondale, Giant, and the other big makers all have entry
    >>level road bikes at that price point. Of course, if you know what you want
    >>and what size you need, you can do very well on eBay.
    >>

    >
    > Wait until Oct/Nov you can probably get a Trek 1200 '05 with 105
    > components
    > for about 600-700 bucks.
    >
    > jj
    >


    I am sure it would be better to get something for this season, unless I
    missed person asking for delayed buy, for ~$650 Trek 1000
     
  6. "eagleeye1200" wrote:

    > What I had in mind was purchasing
    > a new bike. I also mis-stated the type of bike. It is a Marushi Road
    > Race
    > RX3. Anyone ever heard of this bike? Got it a church yard sale for $10
    > and
    > have made no changes except new tires, lube, adjust. Bike is fine,
    > but a bit tall for me as I have short legs for my height. Think I would
    > also like thumb shifters rather than the old style shift levers on the
    > stem
    > like this one has.


    If the bike doesn't fit properly, that IS a good reason to replace it. But
    if you can straddle the frame with your feet flat on the ground and at least
    1/2" of clearance it MAY not be too big. The top tube length is actually
    more important. And since you suggest that your torso is proportionally
    longer than your legs, a long top tube might be good.

    If the bike has stem mounted shifters, it's probably a low-end model. It may
    even have steel rims, and other undesirable features.

    As for paying $500-600 for a new bike and never wanting to upgrade again,
    well, you can never tell. If you start to really get into road riding, you
    may find yourself wanting to ride more than 20-25 miles. And then you might
    want to move up again. But it's best to find out your biking preferences
    before committing to a big purchase.

    For now, may want to look into a hybrid bike. Hybrids are a cross between a
    road bike and a mountain bike. They have upright handlebars, but wheels more
    like a road bike (but with somewhat wider tires). Hybrids are usually less
    expensive than a road bike, and can handle dirt and gravel roads in addition
    to pavement. They're good for distances up to 25-30 miles or so. Beyond that
    they tend to get uncomfortable due to the lack of multiple hand positions on
    the bars and the extra weight supported by the saddle as a result of the
    upright position.

    Road bikes are lighter/faster and put you in a more aerodynamic position.

    I would suggest you test ride some hybrids and road bikes, and see which you
    prefer. And above all, find a shop that will get you on the right size frame
    and set you up on it properly.

    Art Harris
     
  7. Paul Cassel

    Paul Cassel Guest

    eagleeye1200 wrote:

    >
    > New to this group, so please point me in the right direction if there is a
    > bette place to post or a web site where I could find some useful info in
    > making my decision.
    >


    I'm fairly new myself. I had the good luck of knowing a fellow who spent
    years working in a bike shop plus was a semi pro racer himself. He
    pointed me in the right direction which was, somewhat surprising,
    fitmet. I suggest you get yourself to a bicycle fit Web site or visit a
    good local bike shop to be fitted properly. IMO, and what I've been
    told, if the fit is right, then the other stuff, up to a point, are
    details. If the fit is wrong, the bike that Armstrong uses won't work
    for you.

    Also get yourself a set of bicycle pants. Clipless or clip pedals really
    help too (I have clipless). Part of the reason for using clipless pedals
    is the change in shoe from a running shoe makes a big diff. We hear tons
    about how a Dura-Ace such and such is terrific, but folks don't
    understand that we newbies don't know that proper shoes make more diff
    to an efficient ride than the shifter model.

    Good luck and enjoy the ride.

    -paul
     
  8. On Sun, 27 Feb 2005 07:42:09 -0700, Paul Cassel wrote:

    > fitmet. I suggest you get yourself to a bicycle fit Web site or visit a
    > good local bike shop to be fitted properly. IMO, and what I've been
    > told, if the fit is right, then the other stuff, up to a point, are
    > details.


    Very good advice.

    > Also get yourself a set of bicycle pants.


    It's actually the shorts he's referring to, with the padding in the butt
    and the tight fit. These are essential for your comfort. The pad should
    be a clear benefit. The tight fit ensures that you won't sit on a
    fold of fabric that will irritate you after a few miles. Stick to black
    shorts for a host of reasons.

    > Clipless or clip pedals really
    > help too (I have clipless). Part of the reason for using clipless pedals
    > is the change in shoe from a running shoe makes a big diff.


    Another good bit of advice. Bike shoes have very stiff soles, since we
    don't want our feet bending around the pedal. Also, being secured to the
    pedals is extremely important. You get better power that way, and it is
    safer. Don't worry about not being able to get your foot out in a crash.
    For one, having a leg dangle about in a crash is just something else to
    break.

    --

    David L. Johnson

    __o | "What am I on? I'm on my bike, six hours a day, busting my ass.
    _`\(,_ | What are you on?" --Lance Armstrong
    (_)/ (_) |
     
  9. Boyle M. Owl

    Boyle M. Owl Guest

    David L. Johnson wrote:

    > Another good bit of advice. Bike shoes have very stiff soles, since we
    > don't want our feet bending around the pedal. Also, being secured to the
    > pedals is extremely important. You get better power that way, and it is
    > safer. Don't worry about not being able to get your foot out in a crash.
    > For one, having a leg dangle about in a crash is just something else to
    > break.


    I have to chime in here and say that clipless pedals are much SAFER than
    clips and straps for city riding, as it is *far* easier to get in and
    out. Even comparing them to strapless toe clips, it's safer. And
    they're more comfortable, too. Comfort alone is a good enough reason
    for going to clipless and cycling-specific shoes.

    I ride with Egg Beaters. People have told me they get hot spots with
    those, but I haven't had a problem since I got them, and I'm a heavy
    rider too. I love the 4 sided pedal. I can keep an eye on traffic as
    I'm putting my foot down, no searching. The only drawback to these, to
    me, is that the cleat is brass or bronze. It's soft and after a year,
    you need a new cleat, especially if you're an urban rider who clicks and
    unclicks a lot during a ride. Oh, and you'll know when you need a pair
    of cleats when you stand on the pedals and come out of one side. Ow.

    --
    BMO
     
  10. Boyle M. Owl wrote:
    >
    > I have to chime in here and say that clipless pedals are much SAFER

    than
    > clips and straps for city riding, as it is *far* easier to get in and


    > out. Even comparing them to strapless toe clips, it's safer. And
    > they're more comfortable, too. Comfort alone is a good enough reason


    > for going to clipless and cycling-specific shoes.
    >
    > I ride with Egg Beaters. People have told me they get hot spots with


    > those, but I haven't had a problem since I got them, and I'm a heavy
    > rider too. I love the 4 sided pedal. I can keep an eye on traffic

    as
    > I'm putting my foot down, no searching. The only drawback to these,

    to
    > me, is that the cleat is brass or bronze. It's soft and after a

    year,
    > you need a new cleat, especially if you're an urban rider who clicks

    and
    > unclicks a lot during a ride. Oh, and you'll know when you need a

    pair
    > of cleats when you stand on the pedals and come out of one side. Ow.


    Hmm. That last sentence or two sounds incompatible with your first
    sentence above. At least, I don't come out of my Lyotard platform
    pedals with clips and straps.

    Actually, I doubt there's a measurable safety difference between the
    two choices... or the third choice, "naked" pedals.
     
  11. On Sun, 27 Feb 2005 17:06:22 -0800, frkrygow wrote:

    > Actually, I doubt there's a measurable safety difference between the
    > two choices... or the third choice, "naked" pedals.


    I disagree. I tried just naked pedals on my mountain bike/commuter for a
    while, and my feet would slip too much. Granted, I was used to clipless,
    and even before, for many years, I had used clips and straps (with cleats
    except for commuting).

    I quickly put Power Grips (or whatever they are called) and found that to
    be much better than bare pedals, but still far short of clipless.

    --

    David L. Johnson

    __o | Enron's slogan: Respect, Communication, Integrity, and
    _`\(,_ | Excellence.
    (_)/ (_) |
     
  12. Gooserider

    Gooserider Guest

    "Boyle M. Owl" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > David L. Johnson wrote:
    >
    > > Another good bit of advice. Bike shoes have very stiff soles, since we
    > > don't want our feet bending around the pedal. Also, being secured to

    the
    > > pedals is extremely important. You get better power that way, and it is
    > > safer. Don't worry about not being able to get your foot out in a

    crash.
    > > For one, having a leg dangle about in a crash is just something else to
    > > break.

    >
    > I have to chime in here and say that clipless pedals are much SAFER than
    > clips and straps for city riding, as it is *far* easier to get in and
    > out. Even comparing them to strapless toe clips, it's safer. And
    > they're more comfortable, too. Comfort alone is a good enough reason
    > for going to clipless and cycling-specific shoes.
    >

    I rode with clips and straps for about 20 years. Had 'em on my road
    bike(which was my teenaged means of transportation). Rode in traffic, raced,
    trained--no problems. Used Chuck Taylors with them, Nikes, whatever. I lived
    in Wyoming for a while, and had clips and straps on my MTB. No problem. Now
    I have clipless on every bike I own(except the MTB, which has Iron Cross
    pedals). There's no comparison. Clipless is so much better it's not even
    close. Clipless pedals are so cheap(Perfomance offers them for 30 bucks or
    so) that it should be the first upgrade, IMHO.
     
  13. Gooserider

    Gooserider Guest

    "David L. Johnson" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:p[email protected]
    > On Sun, 27 Feb 2005 17:06:22 -0800, frkrygow wrote:
    >
    > > Actually, I doubt there's a measurable safety difference between the
    > > two choices... or the third choice, "naked" pedals.

    >
    > I disagree. I tried just naked pedals on my mountain bike/commuter for a
    > while, and my feet would slip too much. Granted, I was used to clipless,
    > and even before, for many years, I had used clips and straps (with cleats
    > except for commuting).
    >


    I have a pair of DK Iron Cross platform pedals on my MTB. They're a BMX
    pedal with a bunch of pins on the body. The pins bite into the shoe sole and
    there's no slippage. However, they're heavy as lead and definitely would
    look out of place on a road bike.
     
  14. Boyle M. Owl

    Boyle M. Owl Guest

    [email protected] wrote:

    > Hmm. That last sentence or two sounds incompatible with your first
    > sentence above. At least, I don't come out of my Lyotard platform
    > pedals with clips and straps.


    Coming out is not an issue when they're new. It's impossible to come
    out by accident *when they are new*.

    The Eggbeater cleats are a wear item. They're bronze or hard brass,
    from what I can tell; the "wings" of the pedal are hardened stainless
    steel. Instead of having the wings as a wear item, the cleats take the
    wear. After two years, I have gone through 2 sets of cleats and the
    wings look barely worn - just polished.

    The only time you have a chance of coming out is when they're really
    worn. They let me know after the first year. The hard way. Simply
    replacing the cleats ( if you're an urban cyclist like me) yearly keeps
    you from coming out accidentally and that was what I was trying to get
    at. If you're a roadie in the boondocks that only clips in and out at
    the beginning and end of a ride, you can probably go three years between
    cleats. If you're a mountain biker, single tracker, or cyclocrosser
    that bikes through the woods and mud, replacement once a season is
    probably about right.

    Again, as designed, these pedals do not let you out by accident, indeed
    there is no adjustment screw for this unlike the Shimano pedals. The
    harder you pull, the harder they hold on to your shoe. Over time,
    though, they become "no longer as designed" and the wear is quite
    visible to the eye. At this point, it's prudent to exchange the cleats
    for new ones, before your foot goes rolling off the front of the pedal.

    > Actually, I doubt there's a measurable safety difference between the
    > two choices... or the third choice, "naked" pedals.


    Naked pedals are the safest for urban riding. However, they suck for
    comfort, and hill climbing is just a pain in the arse without the
    ability to pull up on the pedal. Clipless pedals are the next safest,
    because it's simpler and quicker to pull out by twisting your heel when
    coming to a stoplight or an emergency stop (aside: Do not WAFFLE about
    pulling out of the pedal because if you come to a complete stop, you're
    going to fall, and there's no way you're going to pull out when you're
    in full panic mode). Pedals with straps and toe clips are the least
    safe for urban riding, and far less comfortable on the top of the foot
    when fully strapped in (as in a rural ride through the countryside
    admiring the cows and sheep).

    Once you try clipless, you'll never go back to clips and straps. Trust me.

    Oh, and another thing: Don't do what I did and go with a cheap set of
    Wellgos to "try it out". Get a decent set of *quality* pedals (like
    Time, Shimano, or Crank Bro's) that can be greased and overhauled. I
    liked going clipless so much that it seems to me that I wasted 50 bux to
    "try" clipless before I bought my stainless Eggbeaters.

    --
    BMO
     
  15. Janet

    Janet Guest

    Arthur Harris wrote:
    <snip.>
    > For now, may want to look into a hybrid bike. Hybrids are a cross between a
    > road bike and a mountain bike. They have upright handlebars, but wheels more
    > like a road bike (but with somewhat wider tires). Hybrids are usually less
    > expensive than a road bike, and can handle dirt and gravel roads in addition
    > to pavement. They're good for distances up to 25-30 miles or so. Beyond that
    > they tend to get uncomfortable due to the lack of multiple hand positions on
    > the bars and the extra weight supported by the saddle as a result of the
    > upright position.
    >

    Disagree with the distance limitations here. I've done longer rides on
    my hybrid with no problems. Get a set of bar ends, and you now have
    multiple hand positions.

    Janet
     
  16. Zoot Katz

    Zoot Katz Guest

    Sun, 27 Feb 2005 23:24:40 -0500, <[email protected]>,
    "Boyle M. Owl" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Coming out is not an issue when they're new. It's impossible to come
    >out by accident *when they are new*.
    >
    >The Eggbeater cleats are a wear item. They're bronze or hard brass,
    >from what I can tell; the "wings" of the pedal are hardened stainless
    >steel. Instead of having the wings as a wear item, the cleats take the
    >wear. After two years, I have gone through 2 sets of cleats and the
    >wings look barely worn - just polished.
    >
    >The only time you have a chance of coming out is when they're really
    >worn. They let me know after the first year. The hard way. Simply
    >replacing the cleats ( if you're an urban cyclist like me) yearly keeps
    >you from coming out accidentally and that was what I was trying to get
    >at. If you're a roadie in the boondocks that only clips in and out at
    >the beginning and end of a ride, you can probably go three years between
    >cleats. If you're a mountain biker, single tracker, or cyclocrosser
    >that bikes through the woods and mud, replacement once a season is
    >probably about right.


    Playing cycle polo on crushed gravel fields eats cleats.
    On the plus side though, it's a strong incentive to not dab.
    --
    zk
     
  17. David Kerber

    David Kerber Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected]
    says...

    ....

    > thanks. My newbie is showing for sure. I said "upgrade", which I now
    > understand
    > means replacing components on an existing bike. What I had in mind was
    > purchasing
    > a new bike. I also mis-stated the type of bike. It is a Marushi Road Race
    > RX3. Anyone ever heard of this bike? Got it a church yard sale for $10 and
    > have made no changes except new tires, lube, adjust. Bike is fine,
    > but a bit tall for me as I have short legs for my height. Think I would
    > also like thumb shifters rather than the old style shift levers on the stem
    > like this one has.


    You aren't going to find thumb shifters on a road bike; that's mountain
    bike stuff. However, you'll probably find that integrated shifters
    (brakes and shifters in the same unit) are even more convenient than
    thumb shifters.

    In the price range you're looking at, you have a lot of choices for
    entry-level road bikes. Take a look at www.fujibikes.com and check out
    their lower-end road bikes.

    Happy hunting!
    Dave

    --
    Remove the ns_ from if replying by e-mail (but keep posts in the
    newsgroups if possible).
     
  18. Janet wrote:

    >Arthur Harris wrote:
    ><snip.>
    >
    >
    >>For now, may want to look into a hybrid bike. Hybrids are a cross between a
    >>road bike and a mountain bike. They have upright handlebars, but wheels more
    >>like a road bike (but with somewhat wider tires). Hybrids are usually less
    >>expensive than a road bike, and can handle dirt and gravel roads in addition
    >>to pavement. They're good for distances up to 25-30 miles or so. Beyond that
    >>they tend to get uncomfortable due to the lack of multiple hand positions on
    >>the bars and the extra weight supported by the saddle as a result of the
    >>upright position.
    >>
    >>
    >>

    >Disagree with the distance limitations here. I've done longer rides on
    >my hybrid with no problems. Get a set of bar ends, and you now have
    >multiple hand positions.
    >
    >Janet
    >
    >
    >

    Agreed. I've toured thousands of miles this way - and also without
    clipless pedals and bike shorts.

    Put the money into your bike and accessorize later.

    --
    *****************************
    Chuck Anderson • Boulder, CO
    http://www.CycleTourist.com
    Integrity is obvious.
    The lack of it is common.
    *****************************
     
  19. Tom Sherman

    Tom Sherman Guest

    Janet wrote:

    >
    >
    > Arthur Harris wrote:
    > <snip.>
    >
    >> For now, may want to look into a hybrid bike. Hybrids are a cross
    >> between a road bike and a mountain bike. They have upright handlebars,
    >> but wheels more like a road bike (but with somewhat wider tires).
    >> Hybrids are usually less expensive than a road bike, and can handle
    >> dirt and gravel roads in addition to pavement. They're good for
    >> distances up to 25-30 miles or so. Beyond that they tend to get
    >> uncomfortable due to the lack of multiple hand positions on the bars
    >> and the extra weight supported by the saddle as a result of the
    >> upright position.
    >>

    > Disagree with the distance limitations here. I've done longer rides on
    > my hybrid with no problems. Get a set of bar ends, and you now have
    > multiple hand positions.


    I have ridden 200-km long day rides on a flat bar bike wearing
    non-cycling shorts without discomfort. The Dark Side does have its
    advantages.

    --
    Tom Sherman - Earth
     
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