Newbie: Spice mix for lamb or chicken kebab

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Alan, Mar 21, 2006.

  1. Alan

    Alan Guest

    Hi Everyone,

    Im a "L" plate member so much help needed.
    Really after a spice mix for chicken or mince lamb
    That can then be formed into sausage shape and
    Cooked in the oven ready for pitta bread.
    The amount of spices is not a problem so really
    The more the merrier.

    Much appreciate any help. Alan
     
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  2. Victor Sack

    Victor Sack Guest

    Alan <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Really after a spice mix for chicken or mince lamb
    > That can then be formed into sausage shape and
    > Cooked in the oven ready for pitta bread.
    > The amount of spices is not a problem so really
    > The more the merrier.


    Minced meat kebabs are common for many national cuisines and spices used
    are often different. Here is a pretty fool-proof Caucasian recipe. It
    is from _Please to the Table_ by Anya von Bremzen and John Welchman.
    Note: personally, I don't like my lamb well-done and would grill the
    kebabs for no longer than 10 minutes. I also wouldn't want to cook it
    in the oven, whether baking or broiling it.

    Victor

    Lyulya kebab

    A properly prepared lyulya kebab calls for the choicest possible lamb
    delicately seasoned with spices and herbs, and most important of all -
    the whole secret of a good lyulya kebab - vigorously kneaded into a very
    smooth, almost white, meat paste. Lyulya kebab are supposed to be
    grilled on special flat skewers that can support the ground meat; when
    grilling on regular skewers they sometimes fall off - so be careful!

    2 pounds boneless leg or shoulder of lamb with just a little fat, cut
    into 2 to 3 inch pieces
    2 large onions
    2 large cloves garlic, finely minced
    1/2 teaspoon ground cumin
    3 tablespoons finely chopped fresh mint
    1/4 cup finely chopped fresh parsley
    1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper, or more to taste
    Salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste
    4 to 5 tablespoons cold water
    1/2 teaspoon sweet Hungarian paprika
    Sumakh for garnish
    Lavash or pita breads
    Thin red onion rings
    Fresh, ripe tomato quarters
    Fresh herb sprigs (mint, cilantro, tarragon, and watercress)
    1 bunch scallions (green onions), trimmed

    1. If grinding the lamb yourself, quarter the onions, put the lamb,
    with the fat and onions, through the meat grinder twice. If the lamb
    was already ground by the butcher, grate the onion and add it to the
    meat.

    2. Combine the ground lamb with the garlic, cumin, chopped herbs,
    cayenne, salt and pepper, and just enough water to give a firm
    consistency. Knead very thoroughly until smooth, then refrigerate for
    30 minutes.

    3. Have ready 6 long metal skewers, preferably flat. Wet your hands
    with cold water. Shape the lamb mixture into 3 1/2-inch-long sausages
    around the skewers. The sausages should sit on skewers tightly.
    Sprinkle with paprika and refrigerate for at least 20 minutes.

    4. Prepare hot coals for grilling until coated with white ash, or
    preheat the broiler. Oil the grill or broiler rack well.

    5. Grill or broil the kebabs 3 inches away from the heat, carefully
    turning to brown evenly on all sides, until well done, about 13 minutes.

    6. Serve the kebabs on the skewers, sprinkled with sumakh and
    accompanied by lavash or pita breads, red onion rings, tomato quarters,
    fresh herbs, and scallions.

    Serves 6
     
  3. Stan  Horwitz

    Stan Horwitz Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    "Alan" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Hi Everyone,
    >
    > Im a "L" plate member so much help needed.
    > Really after a spice mix for chicken or mince lamb
    > That can then be formed into sausage shape and
    > Cooked in the oven ready for pitta bread.
    > The amount of spices is not a problem so really
    > The more the merrier.
    >
    > Much appreciate any help. Alan


    Check Penzey's. They have a lamb spice blend that's fantastic.
    See http://www.penzeys.com for their online catalog.
     
  4. serene

    serene Guest

    On Tue, 21 Mar 2006 13:29:42 -0000, "Alan" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >Im a "L" plate member so much help needed.


    What's an "L" plate member?

    serene
     
  5. Jed

    Jed Guest

    On Sat, 25 Mar 2006 07:18:44 -0800, serene <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >On Tue, 21 Mar 2006 13:29:42 -0000, "Alan" <[email protected]>
    >wrote:
    >
    >>Im a "L" plate member so much help needed.

    >
    >What's an "L" plate member?


    If he's in the UK, which I believe he is, it's a learner's license
    plate. In Holland, they make you put a big blue plastic sign with a
    big yellow "L" on it on top of your car while your still learning to
    drive to warn other drivers. It takes at least a year or so of driving
    as a "Learner" before you can even take the test for your driving
    license and US driver would be appalled at how difficult the tests
    are.
     
  6. serene

    serene Guest

    On Sat, 25 Mar 2006 07:47:21 -0800, Jed
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On Sat, 25 Mar 2006 07:18:44 -0800, serene <[email protected]>
    >wrote:
    >
    >>On Tue, 21 Mar 2006 13:29:42 -0000, "Alan" <[email protected]>
    >>wrote:
    >>
    >>>Im a "L" plate member so much help needed.

    >>
    >>What's an "L" plate member?

    >
    >If he's in the UK, which I believe he is, it's a learner's license
    >plate. In Holland, they make you put a big blue plastic sign with a
    >big yellow "L" on it on top of your car while your still learning to
    >drive to warn other drivers. It takes at least a year or so of driving
    >as a "Learner" before you can even take the test for your driving
    >license and US driver would be appalled at how difficult the tests
    >are.


    What. A. Great. Idea.

    serene
     
  7. serene <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    > On Sat, 25 Mar 2006 07:47:21 -0800, Jed
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>On Sat, 25 Mar 2006 07:18:44 -0800, serene <[email protected]>
    >>wrote:
    >>>
    >>>What's an "L" plate member?

    >>
    >>If he's in the UK, which I believe he is, it's a learner's license
    >>plate. In Holland, they make you put a big blue plastic sign with a
    >>big yellow "L" on it on top of your car while your still learning to
    >>drive to warn other drivers. It takes at least a year or so of driving
    >>as a "Learner" before you can even take the test for your driving
    >>license and US driver would be appalled at how difficult the tests
    >>are.

    >
    > What. A. Great. Idea.
    >


    Do you not have something similar in the US? I suppose I just assumed
    this would be a universal sort of thing.

    It differs a little from state to state here, but in NSW we have L plates
    and P plates. I don't drive, and it's a long time since I was familiar
    with the details and I know they've made it harder, so I went and checked
    (was curious myself as to what's required now). When I was younger there
    was an L plate (while you learnt to drive), then you progressed to P
    plate (after passing driving test), then after a certain period of time
    with no problems, you got your full license. It's become a lot more
    difficult. According to the RTA site (

    You need to be 16 or over to get L plates - you have to sit a written
    driver knowledge test and pass it to get them. You have to have L plates
    to take driving lessons. They have to be displayed at the front and back
    of the car - a yellow square with a big L on it. You can only drive
    whilst supervised by a licenced driver, you can't go above 80km/h, can't
    have a blood alcohol level of anything over 0 (can't drink at all before
    driving, in other words - on a full licence for a standard personal car
    the limit is 0.05). You have to log 50 hrs driving time, have the
    Learner's Permit for at least 6 months, and be 17 or older to sit for the
    Driving Ability Road Test

    If you pass that you get the P1 (provisional) licence. You have to
    display P plates (red P on white background) on front and back of car.
    Maximum speed 90km/h, zero blood alcohol limit - other restrictions as
    well. It's valid for 18 months - after 12 months you can sit a Hazard
    Perception Test. If you pass that you get the P2 licence.

    P2 is valid for 30 months - green P on white background must be
    displayed, max speed 100km/h, zero blood alcohol limit, some other
    restrictions. Once you've held it for 24 months you can take the Driver
    Qualification Test and if you pass that you progress to a full licence.


    --
    Rhonda Anderson
    Cranebrook, NSW, Australia
     
  8. Jed

    Jed Guest

    On Sun, 26 Mar 2006 00:14:38 GMT, Rhonda Anderson
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >serene <[email protected]> wrote in
    >news:[email protected]:
    >
    >> On Sat, 25 Mar 2006 07:47:21 -0800, Jed
    >> <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>>On Sat, 25 Mar 2006 07:18:44 -0800, serene <[email protected]>
    >>>wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>What's an "L" plate member?
    >>>
    >>>If he's in the UK, which I believe he is, it's a learner's license
    >>>plate. In Holland, they make you put a big blue plastic sign with a
    >>>big yellow "L" on it on top of your car while your still learning to
    >>>drive to warn other drivers. It takes at least a year or so of driving
    >>>as a "Learner" before you can even take the test for your driving
    >>>license and US driver would be appalled at how difficult the tests
    >>>are.

    >>
    >> What. A. Great. Idea.
    >>

    >
    >Do you not have something similar in the US? I suppose I just assumed
    >this would be a universal sort of thing.


    [elided description of draconian Aussie driving restrictions]

    In the US, after taking a written test that includes such questions
    as:

    1. You are approaching an intersection and want to make a left turn,
    do you:

    a. Wait until the last possible moment before moving from the right
    hand lane across the traffic in the left hand lane in order to get
    into the left turn lane, then come to a sudden stop with the rear end
    of you car protruding into the laft hand lane?

    b. Insure that your left turn signal is off, slow to 5 mph 100 feet
    before entering the left turn lane, and change your mind at the last
    moment?

    c. Turn right, enter the first driveway in which you can reverse into
    oncoming traffic and return to the intersection thereby avoiding the
    left turn altogether?

    2. What does a yellow light mean at an intersection?

    a. Speed up, the light is about to change.

    b. You have time to make a cell phone call.

    c. All cars except yours must stop.

    d. All of the above.

    If you pass the test by answering appoximately 60% of the questions
    "correctly", then you may take the driving skills test.

    If you can start the car, drive a few blocks without crashing through
    a wall or killing a pedestrian, you will be required to attempt to
    parallel park. If you are able to do that without demolishing a
    parking meter or parking inside a store front, you will be issued a
    driver's license.
     
  9. serene

    serene Guest

    On Sun, 26 Mar 2006 00:14:38 GMT, Rhonda Anderson
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >serene <[email protected]> wrote in
    >news:[email protected]:
    >
    >> On Sat, 25 Mar 2006 07:47:21 -0800, Jed
    >> <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>>On Sat, 25 Mar 2006 07:18:44 -0800, serene <[email protected]>
    >>>wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>What's an "L" plate member?
    >>>
    >>>If he's in the UK, which I believe he is, it's a learner's license
    >>>plate. In Holland, they make you put a big blue plastic sign with a
    >>>big yellow "L" on it on top of your car while your still learning to
    >>>drive to warn other drivers. It takes at least a year or so of driving
    >>>as a "Learner" before you can even take the test for your driving
    >>>license and US driver would be appalled at how difficult the tests
    >>>are.

    >>
    >> What. A. Great. Idea.
    >>

    >
    >Do you not have something similar in the US? I suppose I just assumed
    >this would be a universal sort of thing.


    Nope. The only thing even close that I know of is that the cars owned
    by the places that teach driving will sometimes say "student driver"
    on them somewhere, but I don't think it's required, and it's certainly
    not required that one, for example, put an indicator on mom's car
    while one is driving it with a learner's permit.

    (One can, in California, get a learner's permit when one reaches 15.5
    years of age, but then one is free to test for a driver's license at
    the age of 16. When I was young (I got my license 24 years ago), one
    took a semester-long driver education class in high school, at the
    state's expense, but that's been done away with and now people learn
    on their own, which I think has decreased the number of safe drivers
    out there.)

    serene
     
  10. Nancy Young

    Nancy Young Guest

    "serene" <[email protected]> wrote

    > (One can, in California, get a learner's permit when one reaches 15.5
    > years of age, but then one is free to test for a driver's license at
    > the age of 16. When I was young (I got my license 24 years ago), one
    > took a semester-long driver education class in high school, at the
    > state's expense, but that's been done away with and now people learn
    > on their own, which I think has decreased the number of safe drivers
    > out there.)


    My high school didn't have driver's ed, but others did. Same
    school system, different offerings. Of course you had to take your
    driving test through the city, and the test was on a street, not some
    closed course with cones, what kind of test is that?

    Where I live now, I notice they are talking about an interim
    license ... you have a license, it's not a learner's permit, it is an
    actual license, but until a certain age, you have restrictions.
    When you can be driving (not at night, say), how many passengers
    you can have, like that.

    I think it's a good idea. The statistics are overwhelming, the
    more kids in the car with a teen driver, the more accidents, and
    nasty ones, too. We lose too many high school kids around
    here that way, so sad.

    nancy
     
  11. Dan Abel

    Dan Abel Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    serene <[email protected]> wrote:


    > (One can, in California, get a learner's permit when one reaches 15.5
    > years of age, but then one is free to test for a driver's license at
    > the age of 16. When I was young (I got my license 24 years ago), one
    > took a semester-long driver education class in high school, at the
    > state's expense, but that's been done away with and now people learn
    > on their own, which I think has decreased the number of safe drivers
    > out there.)


    Driver's ed in the schools was reduced at the complaint of the private
    companies, who said that it wasn't fair for the taxpayers to subsidize
    this in competition with them.

    You are still required to take driver's ed to get a license under the
    age of 18. You aren't allowed to learn "on your own".

    --
    Dan Abel
    [email protected]
    Petaluma, California, USA
     
  12. serene

    serene Guest

    On Sun, 26 Mar 2006 10:34:02 -0800, Dan Abel <[email protected]> wrote:

    >In article <[email protected]>,
    > serene <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >
    >> (One can, in California, get a learner's permit when one reaches 15.5
    >> years of age, but then one is free to test for a driver's license at
    >> the age of 16. When I was young (I got my license 24 years ago), one
    >> took a semester-long driver education class in high school, at the
    >> state's expense, but that's been done away with and now people learn
    >> on their own, which I think has decreased the number of safe drivers
    >> out there.)

    >
    >Driver's ed in the schools was reduced at the complaint of the private
    >companies, who said that it wasn't fair for the taxpayers to subsidize
    >this in competition with them.
    >
    >You are still required to take driver's ed to get a license under the
    >age of 18. You aren't allowed to learn "on your own".


    I meant that they go out and pay private companies to teach them,
    rather than learning in the school.

    serene
     
  13. Dan Abel

    Dan Abel Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    "Nancy Young" <[email protected]> wrote:


    > My high school didn't have driver's ed, but others did. Same
    > school system, different offerings. Of course you had to take your
    > driving test through the city, and the test was on a street, not some
    > closed course with cones, what kind of test is that?



    I'm not aware of any city that licenses drivers. This is a function of
    the states (in the US).


    > Where I live now, I notice they are talking about an interim
    > license ... you have a license, it's not a learner's permit, it is an
    > actual license, but until a certain age, you have restrictions.
    > When you can be driving (not at night, say), how many passengers
    > you can have, like that.
    >
    > I think it's a good idea. The statistics are overwhelming, the
    > more kids in the car with a teen driver, the more accidents, and
    > nasty ones, too. We lose too many high school kids around
    > here that way, so sad.



    They have that here in California. I don't remember the details, but it
    involves no passengers under the age of 25, and no driving during
    certain night hours. I don't remember a restriction on number of
    passengers, but my kids are older now, so I am forgetting this stuff.

    --
    Dan Abel
    [email protected]
    Petaluma, California, USA
     
  14. jake

    jake Guest

    Jed wrote:

    > On Sat, 25 Mar 2006 07:18:44 -0800, serene <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    >
    >>On Tue, 21 Mar 2006 13:29:42 -0000, "Alan" <[email protected]>
    >>wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>>Im a "L" plate member so much help needed.

    >>
    >>What's an "L" plate member?

    >
    >
    > If he's in the UK, which I believe he is, it's a learner's license
    > plate. In Holland, they make you put a big blue plastic sign with a
    > big yellow "L" on it on top of your car while your still learning to
    > drive to warn other drivers.


    It's even more strict than that. Those Ls are on cars that are built
    specifically for teaching people how to drive. They have an extra set
    of brakes for the teacher, maybe other controls, too. I.e., they are not
    private cars, they belong to companies that teach driving. Doing
    anything else is not allowed, to my knowledge.

    It takes at least a year or so of driving
    > as a "Learner" before you can even take the test for your driving


    Actually, it takes theory and practical exams.. ho9w long it takes
    anyone depends on how fast they learn. It is typical to fail the exams
    more than once, because you have to be near perfect. And then there is
    the money factor. I believe a one hour lesson costs around 50 or 60
    Euros, these days. It takes dozens of lessons to become good enough to
    get your license - at least.

    > license and US driver would be appalled at how difficult the tests
    > are.
    >
     
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