newbie spoke tension question

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Res09c5t, Mar 8, 2003.

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  1. Res09c5t

    Res09c5t Guest

    Hi, I'm nearly done building my first wheel and I think it's working out pretty good but I'm
    concerned I may be getting too much tension. I'm building with a Phil 36 spoke hub, Mavic CXP33 rim
    and Alpine DT III spokes which are a triple-butted 14-15-13 if I understand them correctly.

    My current worry is that I have too much tension on the spokes. I haven't hit the point of taco-ing
    when stress relieving but when plucked the tone seems higher than my existing wheels. I have four
    bikes in the garage and one is pretty close to it in tone. I have a Wheelsmith tensiometer and when
    I measure with it, the scale reads in the 75-80 range. On the calibration chart that came with the
    tensiometer, for a single gauge 14 spoke, this would translate to about 93-109 kgf. It is off the
    scale for double-butted spokes- a reading of 65 for DB-14 gives a value of 130 kgf.

    So, can any thoughts on this? Which column on the calibration chart should I be using for
    these spokes?

    Thanks! Lyle
     
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  2. Richard Ney

    Richard Ney Guest

    res09c5t writes:

    > Hi, I'm nearly done building my first wheel and I think it's working out pretty good but I'm
    > concerned I may be getting too much tension. I'm building with a Phil 36 spoke hub, Mavic CXP33
    > rim and Alpine DT III spokes which are a triple-butted 14-15-13 if I understand them correctly.
    >
    > My current worry is that I have too much tension on the spokes. I haven't hit the point of
    > taco-ing when stress relieving but when plucked the tone seems higher than my existing wheels. I
    > have four bikes in the garage and one is pretty close to it in tone. I have a Wheelsmith
    > tensiometer and when I measure with it, the scale reads in the 75-80 range. On the calibration
    > chart that came with the tensiometer, for a single gauge 14 spoke, this would translate to about
    > 93-109 kgf. It is off the scale for double-butted spokes- a reading of 65 for DB-14 gives a value
    > of 130 kgf.
    >
    > So, can any thoughts on this? Which column on the calibration chart should I be using for
    > these spokes?

    Use the column on the chart that corresponds to the section of spoke upon which the
    tensiometer lies.

    Also, my recollection of the tacoing process is that the wheel didn't taco by much when I hit the
    max tension level. It's slight.
     
  3. On Sat, 08 Mar 2003 18:26:46 -0500, res09c5t wrote:

    > My current worry is that I have too much tension on the spokes. I haven't hit the point of
    > taco-ing when stress relieving

    In that case, it is not too tight.

    > but when plucked the tone seems higher than my existing wheels.

    So maybe they aren't tight enough. Common.

    > So, can any thoughts on this? Which column on the calibration chart should I be using for
    > these spokes?

    Can't help you there.

    --

    David L. Johnson

    __o | Enron's slogan: Respect, Communication, Integrity, and _`\(,_ | Excellence. (_)/ (_) |
     
  4. Res09c5t

    Res09c5t Guest

    So, as long as I'm not tacoing when stress relieving, I'm ok? I've been worried about pulling the
    nipples through the grommets or something. Thanks!

    "David L. Johnson >" <David L. Johnson <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > On Sat, 08 Mar 2003 18:26:46 -0500, res09c5t wrote:
    >
    > > My current worry is that I have too much tension on the spokes. I haven't hit the point of
    > > taco-ing when stress relieving
    >
    > In that case, it is not too tight.
    >
    > > but when plucked the tone seems higher than my existing wheels.
    >
    > So maybe they aren't tight enough. Common.
    >
    > > So, can any thoughts on this? Which column on the calibration chart should I be using for these
    > > spokes?
    >
    > Can't help you there.
    >
    > --
    >
    > David L. Johnson
    >
    > __o | Enron's slogan: Respect, Communication, Integrity, and _`\(,_ | Excellence. (_)/ (_) |
     
  5. Harris

    Harris Guest

    "res09c5t" wrote:

    > I'm nearly done building my first wheel and I think it's working out
    pretty
    > good but I'm concerned I may be getting too much tension. I'm building
    with
    > a Phil 36 spoke hub, Mavic CXP33 rim and Alpine DT III spokes which are a triple-butted 14-15-13
    > if I understand them correctly.
    >
    > My current worry is that I have too much tension on the spokes. I haven't hit the point of
    > taco-ing when stress relieving but when plucked the tone seems higher than my existing wheels. I
    > have four bikes in the garage and one is pretty close to it in tone.

    The rim is the limiting factor for tension. If your other wheels have lighter rims, they shouldn't
    have as much tension. Or maybe THEY are undertensioned. Do the other wheels also have 36 spokes?
    Similar spokes and lacing pattern? Spoke gauge will affect the tone when plucked. And a wheel with
    fewer spokes will require more tension.

    When stress relieving, make sure you give a good firm squeeze. If the wheel stays true, I think
    you are OK.

    Art Harris
     
  6. res-<< I'm nearly done building my first wheel and I think it's working out pretty good but I'm
    concerned I may be getting too much tension

    take it on down to a decent LBS and have them check it with a tensionometer-

    << I haven't hit the point of taco-ing when stress relieving but when plucked the tone seems higher
    than my existing wheels.

    Tone for tension doesn't work unless the spokes are the same gauge-and the other wheel is tensioned
    correctly-

    << I have a Wheelsmith tensiometer and when I measure with it, the scale reads in the 75-80 range.

    Measure the center section and then look at the chart-

    for a 14/15, seems a little high-should be in the 60 or so range-

    look for about 100kgf

    Peter Chisholm Vecchio's Bicicletteria 1833 Pearl St. Boulder, CO, 80302
    (303)440-3535 http://www.vecchios.com "Ruote convenzionali costruite eccezionalmente bene"
     
  7. Rudge

    Rudge Guest

    Is it a front or rear wheel? If its the rear wheel, is the tensiometer measurement on the drive or
    nondrive side spoke?
     
  8. Res09c5t

    Res09c5t Guest

    This was on the front wheel. I've since gone through and loosened it up so the tensiometer reads in
    the 60's and re-trued it and it seems a lot more "normal" Thanks! Lyle "Rudge" <[email protected]>
    wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Is it a front or rear wheel? If its the rear wheel, is the tensiometer measurement on the drive or
    > nondrive side spoke?
     
  9. rudge-<< Is it a front or rear wheel? If its the rear wheel, is the tensiometer measurement on the
    drive or nondrive side spoke?

    Front and right side rear should be the same for similar components-he said it was about 140kgf,
    hopefully that's not the left side rear.

    Peter Chisholm Vecchio's Bicicletteria 1833 Pearl St. Boulder, CO, 80302
    (303)440-3535 http://www.vecchios.com "Ruote convenzionali costruite eccezionalmente bene"
     
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