Newbie-to-Full-Suspension questions . . .

Discussion in 'Mountain Bikes' started by anonimo, Oct 23, 2010.

  1. anonimo

    anonimo New Member

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    Well, after using a cross bike (with 42c tires) as a MTB --yes, even on some rather technical stuff! -- I just bought my first FS MTB (Giant Warp '06). First, how exactly does the suspension effect positioning, relative to a road bike fit? On my first try, it appears I need the seat a bit higher and much further rearward -- at least 2 cm -- in order to mimic the same position -- roughly heel-on-pedal and knee-over-pedal -- as on my road bike. Does this sound right, or do I need to set it up differently? Also, how would the seat-to-bar distance compare with the drop bar setup? (The distance from tip-of-seat to the road bar is 53 cm . . . should this be the same for the MTB?) Next, what kind of tire pressure is recommended for my 2.1 clincher tires (I weigh about 165 lbs.)? Also, on the rear shock -- coil spring -- it says to increase the pre-load by "turning the knob clockwise . . ." Is this while looking from the front or the rear of the spring?
     
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  2. JM01

    JM01 New Member

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    Let Google be your friend...also, having so many basic questions, it may be an idea to spend some time at your LBS, They'll be happy to walk you through the fundamentals, hoping that you'll become a steady customer.

    As far as fitting you to the bike, I'm assuming that you bought the right size, but when on the trails, your saddle and seat post adjustment will depend on how and where you ride...same with tire pressure. On descents you need to get your weight over the rear wheel, climbs, over the front. Whether you sit or stand also depends on the terrain, although with most FS bikes, it's best to stay seated, unless you have a peddle bob issue, then you may need lock-out suspensions.

    Good luck...
     
  3. rocktheroadbike

    rocktheroadbike New Member

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    During technical riding it's best to stand and let the bike "float" underneath you, allowing your bent knees to absorb the bumps. When I'm "floating" I like to have my seat lower so I don't get bumped by the seat. During climbs I like to have a taller seat post. This allows for full and powerful leg extension. To help adjust the seat post quickly, a quick release seat post clamp is suggested. If your seat post or frame is carbon be sure not to over-tighten or else you may cause damage!

    At the Boys adventure camp I work at, we instruct the riders to start their saddle at the height of their hip joint and then adjust from there!
    Happy Riding!
     
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