Newbie Tri Bike Purchase

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by allie1282, Feb 22, 2004.

  1. allie1282

    allie1282 New Member

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    I have recently begun training for several sprint and olympic distace Triathlons taking place this summer. The only problem is I have no bike! I have been spinning like crazy but really need bike to start outdoor training in the spring.
    So my purpose is to train and race on a bike for relatively short distance triathlons (12-25 miles max), as well as a few off-road triathlons where a mountain or hybrid bike is required. I am female, 5'5", 140lbs. I have read that aerobars and clipless pedals are necessary triathlon equipment as well.
    I am an experienced swimmer and runner but when it comes to cycling I am totally clueless - HELP! I have about $800 to spend.
    Any IDEAS??
    I would very much appreciate any advice all you more experienced riders can give me!!
    THANKS! :cool:
     
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  2. scighera

    scighera New Member

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    Aerobars are necessary, but clipless pedals are not. There are special adaptera that you can bind under your walking shoes, so you're able to use SPD pedals.


    About the bike. Try to catch a used bike (I was able to buy a Giant MCR1 with Dura-Ace 2x9, nice wheeld and a Syntace Triathlon aerobar (this bar is used by many triathletes)

    Important is that the wheels, cassette, crankset etc is in excellent condition.
    Good triathlon bikes are the TCR (aero)from Giaat, CAAD series from Cannondale and de bikes from Trek.

    When you like Triathlon, train further to the Iron Man, that's one of the greatest experiences. (I hope to do that within 5 years, but at the moment I'm preparing for my first Triathlon over the 1/4 distance)
     
  3. chris_gr

    chris_gr New Member

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    I hope you enjoy Tri. It can be great.
    As for bikes I think starting with a used one is a good idea but it might be tricky getting a good fit (the #1 most important thing). If you decide to go with a new bike then definitely go to a good bike shop that understands roadbikes and fit.

    As for bikes it depends on your budget. If you are just getting into it you might want to consider a basic bike with just 8 gears in the back (usually 3 rings up fronts, so 3 x 8=24 total). The down side is the fact you will not be able to effectively upgrade the bike in the future. But odds are if you are hooked you will get something much better than an entry level 9 speed.

    Good 8 speed options are the Giant OCR3, Trek 1000, or if you are in Canada Devinci. They are all pretty much the same price and specs so go with the one that feels and looks the best.

    I you think that 9 gears in the back is a must then there are lots of good bikes for about $200-300 more.

    IMO Tribars are optional in a sprint, a good idea in Olympic and a must in 1/2 Ironman and Ironman. Personally I think clipless is the 1st thing to buy ahead of Aerobars.

    Anyway good luck. Feel free to post any questions that come up as you get geared up. This is just my 3rd season but I have made my share of smart and dumb purchases. I am getting ready fo my 1st half Ironman in July so my butt will be spending a lot of time in the saddle.
     
  4. Aztec

    Aztec New Member

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    You need a bike that you can train on -- doing lots of miles -- as well as race on. This is a little tricky because a true aero/tri bike is built around the aero position rather than a comfy road position. For example, the bars will be a little low, and very close to your knees. That's important so that when you are on the aero bars, you can be in the right position.

    I would strongly suggest a Cervelo One. It's a compromise that works well for both. But it's more like $1000. And you'll struggle to find one used. A Cervelo Soloist would be MUCH better for dual purpose, but they are more like $1700. There are lots of Cannondales used, and they are a dime a dozen. Many of them also aren't great bikes for tri (some are just a road bike with aero bars). Quintana Roo has an entry-level tri bike for around $1000 as well, I think.

    I don't think it's wise to get a regular road bike and try to stick aero bars on it -- the fit will likely be very poor (bars too far out, possibly too high, and you'll be too bent at the waist). So either ride a road bike as is, or get a dual purpose compromise like one of the Cervelos. Or just deal with a dedicated tri bike like one of the Cannondales, etc., when on road rides.
     
  5. chris_gr

    chris_gr New Member

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    I'm not a big fan of aerobars on road bikes as well. I have a Fuji Aloha for Tri's (not a bad value for entry level tri bike). I use to use my road bike with a pair of Syntace C2's but it never felt right. I still think people new to the sport should start with a roadbike unless they are sure that they will get into it. It is a nice luxury to have both.

    BTW: I think Cervelos are great.
     
  6. scighera

    scighera New Member

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    I don't have problems with my Syntace Aerobars, after I have tested some different settings (Seat(post), bar, aerobar etc) I have found a very comfortable and aerodynamic position on my bike. In this position I can last long, mak easy turn an getting over hills an bad road survaces too.
     
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