Newspaper Editor beaten to death after commenting on electric bicycle fees

Discussion in 'Australia and New Zealand' started by Gemma_k, Feb 6, 2006.

  1. Gemma_k

    Gemma_k Guest

    http://www.news.com.au/story/0,10117,18068895-23109,00.html
    Editor dies after police beating
    From: Reuters
    From correspondents in Beijing

    February 07, 2006

    A CHINESE newspaper editor had died from injuries months after traffic
    police beat him up for an expose about exorbitant electric bicycle licence
    fees, a New York-based press watchdog said.

    A spokesman for the Taizhou city government in the eastern coastal province
    of Zhejiang confirmed that Wu Xianghu, 41, deputy editor of the Taizhou
    Evening News, had died, but said the cause of death had yet to be
    determined.
    China's tightly controlled state media have not mentioned Wu's death on
    Thursday last week, even though they reported the October attack.

    The Committee to Protect Journalists said yesterday that authorities had
    prevented local media from reporting the death.

    Chinese journalists who report crime and corruption in the newly competitive
    media environment face increasing incidents of violence, the committee said.

    Dozens of uniformed traffic police stormed into the newspaper's offices on
    October 20 and assaulted Wu, state media and press watchdogs said at the
    time.

    The attack stemmed from a report in the previous day's newspaper on high
    licence fees imposed by police on electric bicycles.
    Wu died of liver and kidney failure after months of hospital treatment, the
    committee said. The official Xinhua news agency reported last year that Wu's
    liver had been damaged.

    The Paris-based Reporters Without Borders said Wu underwent a liver
    transplant two years ago.

    A newspaper colleague today confirmed Wu's death but would not provide
    details.

    "The death of our colleague after he was brutally assaulted for his work is
    a cruel reminder of the new dangers faced by Chinese journalists," Committee
    to Protect Journalists executive director Ann Cooper said.

    "The government must ensure the safety of the working press. This begins by
    bringing to justice the attackers of Wu Xianghu."

    Senior traffic police officer Li Xiaoguo was sacked for his role in the
    incident, Xinhua reported at the time.

    Li had demanded an apology which led to an argument with Wu at the newspaper
    office. He then summoned colleagues to the scene.

    The Taizhou city government spokesman said no charges had been brought
    against anyone involved in the attack.
     
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  2. cfsmtb

    cfsmtb New Member

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    Actually Wu died from complications resulting from the initial assault & existing health problems. As if that makes a lick of difference to the amount of corruption & collusion. Meanwhile, back on January 25:

    Beijing OKs electric bicycles
    http://www.peopleandplanet.net/doc.php?id=2645
    The Chinese capital has removed the ban on electric bicycles to ease city traffic, which have become increasingly congested due to fast rising numbers of cars on the road.

    A circular from the Beijing Municipal Public Security Bureau said from January 4, electric bikes that have met national standards and entered an approved list are officially allowed to take to the road after being registered with the city's traffic administration.

    The city stopped registering electric bikes from August 2002 after the number reached tens of thousands, citing the reason that used batteries of such bikes are hard to dispose of and may pollute the environment.

    The point has been hotly debated by the public. Electric bike producers argued a sound system for retrieving and disposing of used batteries has been established. Beijing citizens generally favour lifting the ban, saying such bikes are very convenient means of transportation.

    Buses and subway trains in Beijing are notoriously crowded. Electric bikes are the best option for a large number of people who desire quick transport but cannot comfortably afford cars.

    Electric bike producers, environmental experts and ordinary citizens have never stopped lobbying for the removal of the ban.

    Removal of the ban came as pressure mounts on city administrators to tackle horrible traffic congestion, air pollution and possible fuel supply, caused to a large extent by a rapidly growing number of cars on the road.

    It is just part of a series of measures undertaken by the capital city to address traffic congestion. Other major steps include greatly increasing the number of buses and building more urban railways.

    Some other areas in China, including a few cities in Hubei and Guangdong provinces, still ban the use of electric bikes.
     
  3. TimC

    TimC Guest

    On 2006-02-07, cfsmtb (aka Bruce)
    was almost, but not quite, entirely unlike tea:
    > http://www.peopleandplanet.net/doc.php?id=2645

    ....
    > The city stopped registering electric bikes from August 2002 after the
    > number reached tens of thousands, citing the reason that used batteries
    > of such bikes are hard to dispose of and may pollute the environment.


    That is so clearly bogus. Batteries on bikes are made of chemicals as
    nasty as the batteries in cars (OK, so its cadmium vs lead. Which
    would you prefer being let into the environment if illegally dumped?).
    I don't know how many people illegally dump dead car batteries in
    China, but if it is anything like Australia, they're hardly going to
    be more environmentally friendly than a bike battery.


    I wonder what the real reason was?

    --
    TimC
    "A distributed system is one in which I cannot get something done
    because a machine I've never heard of is down." -- Leslie Lamport
     
  4. cfsmtb

    cfsmtb New Member

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    The pre-existing Chinese socialist market economy moving towards a privatised market economy. Just like ours.
     
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