No More Flats?

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Gumbo5 99, Sep 29, 2003.

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  1. Gumbo5 99

    Gumbo5 99 Guest

    I've been looking at some product literature for puncture proof inner tubes. Specifically the ones
    I've been looking at are made by cyclo manufacturing. http://www.nomorflats.com/ Has anyone used
    this product, or something similar? What do you think?
     
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  2. Werehatrack

    Werehatrack Guest

    On Mon, 29 Sep 2003 13:06:29 GMT, [email protected] may have said:

    >I've been looking at some product literature for puncture proof inner tubes. Specifically the ones
    >I've been looking at are made by cyclo manufacturing. http://www.nomorflats.com/ Has anyone used
    >this product, or something similar? What do you think?

    Haven't used it; the idea is unappealing for a couple of reasons, and I'm sure there are other
    drawbacks I haven't thought of.

    A few key observations about things taken from their FAQ:

    "Q: Is it difficult to install?"

    "A: Each NO-MOR FLATS® inner tube comes with complete installation instructions. However, if you
    prefer not to install this product yourself, your local professional bicycle dealer can provide this
    service at nominal cost."

    Translation: If the product is the right size for your tire, installation is no picnic. If
    installation is easy, it's not the right size. Imagine trying to install the tire in between the
    tube and rim *with the tube inflated*, if a tube existed that would permit such a procedure. That's
    what you're doing if the thing is really designed to maintain the same level of effective inflation
    tension on the tire bead as would be produced by conventional methods. Part of the reason that the
    tension is needed there is to keep the tire from squirming out of the rim. If they don't maintain
    that tension, what's likely to happen? If they *do* manage to make it work, then getting the tire on
    to the rim is going to be interesting. Remember that with the regular tube deflated, what eases the
    process of getting the tire onto the rim is the fact that the tire bead can drop into the spoke head
    area in the rest of the circumference to allow a bit more room to get the last bit over the edge of
    the rim. That's not likely to be possible with these.

    For additional illumination, ask your lbs about their opinion of the product *before* you buy it.

    "Q: How much does it weigh?"

    "A: NO-MOR FLATS® weighs only about 14 ounces more than a normal thorn-proof inner tube (depending
    upon the tube size). A normal bike lock and cable, a briefcase, or schoolbooks add far more weight
    to the bicycle than NO-MOR FLATS®."

    In other words, a pair of these adds almost two pounds of weight to the normal bike. This isn't
    really all that much for somebody of my mass, but for some it's a real consideration.

    And then there's the bit of what looks to me like grammatic obfuscation:

    "Q: Is it fitted with a foam or gel sealant?"

    "A: NO-MOR FLATS® is a revolutionary bicycle inner tubes contain no foam or gel sealants."

    Ahhh, the ambiguity of the English language. Many, if not most, will read that as meaning "contain
    no foam, or gel sealants", implying that the design doesn't use a foam interior. What it says,
    however, is that it contains no foam *sealant* or gel sealant. In other words, it's a foam noodle
    with a non-foam resilient cover, but there's no sealant inside.

    In its defense, I think it's an excellent product for use on wheelchairs, very small kids' bikes,
    garden carts and the like, where speeds of travel will be low. In fact, I might even pick up a
    couple to use on the garden cart I plan to build, while they are still in stock at Wal-Mart. But I
    won't be using them on any of my bikes.


    --
    My email address is antispammed; pull WEEDS if replying via e-mail. Yes, I have a killfile. If I
    don't respond to something, it's also possible that I'm busy.
     
  3. Werehatrack <[email protected]> wrote in news:[email protected]:

    > On Mon, 29 Sep 2003 13:06:29 GMT, [email protected] may have said:
    >
    >>I've been looking at some product literature for puncture proof inner tubes. Specifically the ones
    >>I've been looking at are made by cyclo manufacturing. http://www.nomorflats.com/ Has anyone used
    >>this product, or something similar? What do you think?
    >
    > Haven't used it; the idea is unappealing for a couple of reasons, and I'm sure there are other
    > drawbacks I haven't thought of.
    >
    > A few key observations about things taken from their FAQ:
    >
    > "Q: Is it difficult to install?"
    >
    > "A: Each NO-MOR FLATS® inner tube comes with complete installation instructions. However, if you
    > prefer not to install this product yourself, your local professional bicycle dealer can provide
    > this service at nominal cost."
    >
    > Translation: If the product is the right size for your tire, installation is no picnic. If
    > installation is easy, it's not the right size. Imagine trying to install the tire in between the
    > tube and rim *with the tube inflated*, if a tube existed that would permit such a procedure.
    > That's what you're doing if the thing is really designed to maintain the same level of effective
    > inflation tension on the tire bead as would be produced by conventional methods. Part of the
    > reason that the tension is needed there is to keep the tire from squirming out of the rim. If they
    > don't maintain that tension, what's likely to happen? If they *do* manage to make it work, then
    > getting the tire on to the rim is going to be interesting. Remember that with the regular tube
    > deflated, what eases the process of getting the tire onto the rim is the fact that the tire bead
    > can drop into the spoke head area in the rest of the circumference to allow a bit more room to get
    > the last bit over the edge of the rim. That's not likely to be possible with these.
    >
    > For additional illumination, ask your lbs about their opinion of the product *before* you buy it.
    >
    > "Q: How much does it weigh?"
    >
    > "A: NO-MOR FLATS® weighs only about 14 ounces more than a normal thorn-proof inner tube (depending
    > upon the tube size). A normal bike lock and cable, a briefcase, or schoolbooks add far more weight
    > to the bicycle than NO-MOR FLATS®."
    >
    > In other words, a pair of these adds almost two pounds of weight to the normal bike. This isn't
    > really all that much for somebody of my mass, but for some it's a real consideration.
    >
    > And then there's the bit of what looks to me like grammatic obfuscation:
    >
    > "Q: Is it fitted with a foam or gel sealant?"
    >
    > "A: NO-MOR FLATS® is a revolutionary bicycle inner tubes contain no foam or gel sealants."
    >
    > Ahhh, the ambiguity of the English language. Many, if not most, will read that as meaning "contain
    > no foam, or gel sealants", implying that the design doesn't use a foam interior. What it says,
    > however, is that it contains no foam *sealant* or gel sealant. In other words, it's a foam noodle
    > with a non-foam resilient cover, but there's no sealant inside.
    >
    > In its defense, I think it's an excellent product for use on wheelchairs, very small kids' bikes,
    > garden carts and the like, where speeds of travel will be low. In fact, I might even pick up a
    > couple to use on the garden cart I plan to build, while they are still in stock at Wal-Mart. But I
    > won't be using them on any of my bikes.
    >
    >
    >

    IMHO, there's really no such animal as a completely puncture proof innertube. The "punchure
    resistant" tubes are merely heavier tubes with thicker walls, sometimes with fix-a-flat, slime, or
    some other sealer added. Then you got things like Mr. Tuff, the nylon tape stuff that goes between
    the tube and the tire; that'll improve your chances, but still a nail, bit of glass, hard enough
    thorn, ect hitting at the right angle will poke through
    it.If you really want to put an end to flats - and endure a far harsher ride, not to mention being a
    *bitch* to install - then go with a set of "tubes" made of foam rubber.
     
  4. Werehatrack

    Werehatrack Guest

    On Mon, 29 Sep 2003 14:47:04 -0000, "Traveller v.116" <[email protected]> may have said:

    >If you really want to put an end to flats - and endure a far harsher ride, not to mention being a
    >*bitch* to install - then go with a set of "tubes" made of foam rubber.

    That's what the OP was asking for opinions about here. I hadn't known about the harsher ride, but
    it figures.

    I think I'll stay with tubes.

    --
    My email address is antispammed; pull WEEDS if replying via e-mail. Yes, I have a killfile. If I
    don't respond to something, it's also possible that I'm busy.
     
  5. Ron Hardin

    Ron Hardin Guest

    If these are some sort of plastic inner tubes that take the place of an inflated tube, they were
    around in the late 70s and died. The effect is to eliminate flats but they're hell to get on and
    off, actually dangerous once you soap them up and start using brute force tools, when you slip.

    The outer tire wears through, incidentally, and that's what makes you take them off. The ride is
    rough, and I broke a couple of hubs from the increased shock and vibration.

    Stay with air, if these are not.

    You can eliminate most flats by moving to Ohio. I get one every 4,000 miles out here. It was one
    every 200 miles in NJ.

    They're so infrequent in Ohio that I no longer carry flat tools, and just walk home twice a
    year instead.
    --
    Ron Hardin [email protected]

    On the internet, nobody knows you're a jerk.
     
  6. David

    David Guest

    <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > I've been looking at some product literature for puncture proof inner tubes. Specifically the ones
    > I've been looking at are made by cyclo manufacturing. http://www.nomorflats.com/ Has anyone used
    > this product, or something similar?

    I've used something similar. It's the tail end of thorn season here, and my child bikes a few miles
    to school. After I got tired of patching tubes every day or so, I installed pre-slimed tubes. I
    think they were 4 for $20 from Cambria.

    They aren't perfect, but if you want very good puncture resistance, at close to an ordinary tire
    performance/weight, it's a pretty good compromise.

    David
     
  7. Gumbo5 99

    Gumbo5 99 Guest

    On Mon, 29 Sep 2003 18:05:26 GMT, Ron Hardin <[email protected]> wrote:

    >You can eliminate most flats by moving to Ohio. I get one every 4,000 miles out here. It was one
    >every 200 miles in NJ.
    >
    >They're so infrequent in Ohio that I no longer carry flat tools, and just walk home twice a
    >year instead.

    I'm in Indiana. Probably about the same.

    >Stay with air, if these are not.

    Ok you guys have talked me into it. Thanks for the advice. There seems to be a wealth of
    knowledge here. Jim
     
  8. On Mon, 29 Sep 2003 06:06:29 -0700, gumbo5_99 wrote:
    > I've been looking at some product literature for puncture proof inner tubes. Specifically the ones
    > I've been looking at are made by cyclo manufacturing. http://www.nomorflats.com/ Has anyone used
    > this product, or something similar? What do you think?

    These things pop up every few years and then go away a few years later.

    As we all know, nothing beats Dunlap's Pneumatic Tubes for comfort and control. (In other words, you
    want tires that just have air in them!)

    If you're really worried about puncture resistance, get yourself some great tires to wrap
    around those tubes. I'd personally recommend both the Specialized Armadillos and Continental
    Gatorskin tires.

    And if you can't get that, at least throw a Mr. Tuffy between your tube and tire. That'll take care
    of everything but the pinch flats.

    Enjoy. Elmo King.
     
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