noises outside massage room

Discussion in 'Health and medical' started by Brian Ligotti, Mar 6, 2004.

  1. Hello....I'm sure we all deal with some sort of noise
    outside our massage rooms/offices. People talking, doors
    opening & closing, etc.

    Question....We all use music, but I was wondering if
    anyone here found a certain item that helped drowned
    out the sounds, but wasn't a distraction to the
    massage. What ever you found that really helped
    drowned out the sounds you hear from outside your
    room, please post it!

    I just bought one of those 54" bubble lamps (fills with
    water). The noise from the pump has helped some or me.

    Brian
     
    Tags:


  2. Tiffany

    Tiffany Guest

    The one room I work out of has no heat or Ac in it so I
    usually am running a little heater or a fan. That helps
    drown out noise, as that room is in a fitness center and you
    can hear the bass from the aerobic classes.

    T Brian Ligotti <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]
    3257.bay.webtv.net...
    > Hello....I'm sure we all deal with some sort of noise
    > outside our massage rooms/offices. People talking, doors
    > opening & closing, etc.
    >
    > Question....We all use music, but I was wondering if
    > anyone here found a certain item that helped drowned
    > out the sounds, but wasn't a distraction to the
    > massage. What ever you found that really helped
    > drowned out the sounds you hear from outside your
    > room, please post it!
    >
    > I just bought one of those 54" bubble lamps (fills
    > with water). The noise from the pump has helped some
    > or me.
    >
    > Brian
     
  3. George

    George Guest

    If you want to keep the sound out, here are some options:
    1) Most of today's construction is frame and drywall
    (typically thin drywall)...you can reduce the
    transmission of sound by using thicker drywall or two
    layers of it, having studs spaced more closely than 16",
    filling the walls with sand, etc. all to reduce the
    possibility of walls vibrating -- pros: lets you keep
    room looking normal (whatever that means to you); cons:
    most expensive solution & you generally have to own the
    building and be willing to remodel
    2) Heavy drapes and fabrics reduce the possibility of the
    air in the room transmitting the vibration (sound) to
    your client...hardwood floors, tile, etc increase the
    possibility -- pros: relatively inexpensive and anyone
    can do it; cons: may not be the look you wanted and
    makes the environment less "allergy friendly"
    3) Use sound treatments on your walls such as Sonex panels
    -- pros: most effective per dollar spent (but stilll not
    cheap); cons: have to think up some way to incorporate
    "recording studio" styling into your decor
    4) If you have a larger room, you can add office-type, fabric-
    covered partitions (or make your own) -- pros:
    versatile, easily modified, non-permanent, relatively
    inexpensive; cons: once again another strange look to
    deal with and the cubicle look may not be relaxing to
    some clients

    Hope this helps! George "Brian Ligotti"
    <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]
    3257.bay.webtv.net...
    > Hello....I'm sure we all deal with some sort of noise
    > outside our massage rooms/offices. People talking, doors
    > opening & closing, etc.
    >
    > Question....We all use music, but I was wondering if
    > anyone here found a certain item that helped drowned
    > out the sounds, but wasn't a distraction to the
    > massage. What ever you found that really helped
    > drowned out the sounds you hear from outside your
    > room, please post it!
    >
    > I just bought one of those 54" bubble lamps (fills
    > with water). The noise from the pump has helped some
    > or me.
    >
    > Brian
     
  4. Ben & Lydia

    Ben & Lydia Guest

    "Brian Ligotti" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Hello....I'm sure we all deal with some sort of noise
    > outside our massage rooms/offices. People talking, doors
    > opening & closing, etc.
    Question....We all use music, but I was wondering if
    anyone here
    > found a certain item that helped drowned out the sounds,
    > but wasn't a
    distraction to the massage. What ever you found that really
    helped drowned out the sounds you hear from outside your
    room, please post it!

    Brian, after asking many, many clients when I first started
    in massage therapy about the noises outside the
    room.....most said they hadn't noticed the noises. Of course
    that was noises like doors opening/closing, the occasional
    car horn from the parking lot, etc., not someone talking
    right outside the door. The lesson I learned was that I was
    much more sensitive to noise than the client receiving the
    massage. So, I continue to play music at a moderate, non-
    intrusive, level and forget about the noise.

    Ben Crabtree, RMT, CNMT San Antonio, Texas
     
  5. John Smith

    John Smith Guest

    As a client, I've requested massages for the benefit of
    helping my muscles and joints feel better. I'm not doing it
    for the relaxation. My wife can give me a relaxing massage.

    It's inevitable that I'm more relaxed at the end of my
    massage than at the beginning, but that's not the point of a
    massage for me.

    My therapist was also bothered by noises from upstairs and
    next door, but they were of no concern to me. Of course,
    we're not talking power tools or throbbing bass from an
    aerobics class.

    With my very limited massage experience, I would say that
    I'm focused on what the therapist is doing and not on what's
    going on next door. Music at a level that is not
    distracting, but loud enough takes care of general
    reasonable levels of noise.

    But, speaking of music, dear god in heaven, please play
    something besides enya (or whatever that is)!

    JS

    Ben & Lydia wrote:
    > "Brian Ligotti" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]
    > 3257.bay.webtv.net...
    >
    >>Hello....I'm sure we all deal with some sort of noise
    >>outside our massage rooms/offices. People talking, doors
    >>opening & closing, etc.
    >
    > Question....We all use music, but I was wondering if
    > anyone here
    >
    >>found a certain item that helped drowned out the sounds,
    >>but wasn't a
    >
    > distraction to the massage. What ever you found that
    > really helped drowned out the sounds you hear from outside
    > your room, please post it!
    >
    >
    > Brian, after asking many, many clients when I first
    > started in massage therapy about the noises outside the
    > room.....most said they hadn't noticed the noises. Of
    > course that was noises like doors opening/closing, the
    > occasional car horn from the parking lot, etc., not
    > someone talking right outside the door. The lesson I
    > learned was that I was much more sensitive to noise than
    > the client receiving the massage. So, I continue to play
    > music at a moderate, non-intrusive, level and forget about
    > the noise.
    >
    > Ben Crabtree, RMT, CNMT San Antonio, Texas
     
  6. Tiffany

    Tiffany Guest

    Actually its not that bad not having heat/ac directly in the
    room. I worked in a room with AC but since each room in the
    office was different (as far as some getting sun, others
    not) mine would get freezing cold, plus you could feel the
    air come at you from above.

    My room is toasty in the winter and cool enough in the
    summer. It is amazing but it works well. And trust me, I am
    way to picky about things.

    Tiffany B L <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]
    3256.bay.webtv.net...
    > Thanks for the responses....Tiff, no Heat or AC, geez,
    > that is a bummer. Speaking of no heat, I just bought this
    > new space heater, and I wanted to mention the name...I
    > will write it down at work and post it. Its the best space
    > heater I ever used. It really heats the room evenly. It
    > was $70, worth every cent.
    >
    > Ben, you made some great points, and I have
    > tossed that around in my head too. I worked at a
    > club several years ago where music played loud
    > through out the club, but I still did well
    > there. And like you, I have asked clients about
    > noises after their massage, and they didn't know
    > what I was talking about. The reason I'm even
    > worrying, is that I'm moving locations, and I
    > can see the new place won't be as quiet as the
    > old place (but the rent difference is $500 a
    > month!). My new room is in the hall before the
    > locker rooms. Mainly dealing with doors opening
    > and closing from the people enter the locker
    > room. It a place where you have to swipe a card
    > to get in the door, and the doors "click" when
    > they shut.
    >
    > I'm painting the room wednesday, its about 9x16.
    > But of course listening to all the little noises
    > when the room is empty and nothing is on or
    > running, makes things seem louder. I should post
    > before and after photo's of the room. It was
    > used by another therapist before me, and I have
    > no idea how he brought people in the room. It
    > was dirty and smelled like shit. The joke at the
    > club was, he charged $60 for the massage, but
    > $10 of that was for the oxygen tank used during
    > the massage, LOL. I plan to get some pics before
    > I paint. I just wish I would have taken photo's
    > before I threw away everything in the
    > room...including the massage table! I found some
    > old food under the table. The place was a sight
    > to see when I walked in the first time.
    >
    >
    > Brian (massageBL)
     
  7. Chris Zakes

    Chris Zakes Guest

    On Sat, 6 Mar 2004 19:56:05 -0500, "Tiffany" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >The one room I work out of has no heat or Ac in it so I
    >usually am running a little heater or a fan. That helps
    >drown out noise, as that room is in a fitness center and
    >you can hear the bass from the aerobic classes.
    >
    >T

    <chuckle> It could be worse. My massage school shared a
    building with a movie theatre. During massage sessions you
    could hear the rumbles and explosions from the soundtrack,
    and when a movie let out, one set of exits was into a
    cinderblock tunnel (i.e. *lots* of echos) that ran right
    past our work area.

    -Chris Zakes LDP Massage Texas

    "If I've reached the place where I'm a good influence on
    anybody, it's time I cultivated some new vices."

    -Oscar Jensen in "Space Cadet" by Robert Heinlein
     
  8. Cloud Burst

    Cloud Burst Guest

    Outside noises when I'm getting a massage don't bother me
    any more than outside noises when I'm sleeping and having a
    good dream. In fact, for me they tend to make the dream (and
    massage) a little more interesting than they probably would
    have otherwise been. When my massage therapist gets me going
    I'm really out there.

    A little external stimulus that my subconscious turns into
    "something".

    Damn I like massage.

    I suppose if I were giving a massage, I might be annoyed.

    Go figure.

    CB
     
  9. L Kelly

    L Kelly Guest

    < Question....We all use music, but I was wondering if
    anyone here found a certain item that helped drowned out
    the sounds>

    Placement is important. Put noisemakers or music boxes or
    speakers at table level, facing client's ears. Stereo setup
    with a speaker facing each ear is good.

    You may not be able to drown out but you can interfere
    with unwanted sound. I have music speakers all over the
    room and also use a "heartbeat" thangey when there is a
    lot of noise. LK
     
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