Noisy chain, maintenance ideas?

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by Stainlesssteelr, Apr 22, 2003.

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  1. OK, so it's not so much a noisy chain but I find that the chain and sprockets on the derailleur
    (sorry I don't know the posh name!) seem rather noisy (clattery?), for lack of a better word(s). On
    this basis I was after maintenance ideas for the chain at least, and ideally the rest of the system.
    How often should I be oiling and greasing, and what should I oil and grease? I oil the chain once a
    month or so with TF2 (lubricant spray with Teflon) but it attracts a lot of dirt (even though it is
    wiped down after oiling). I'm sure the dirt isn't helping matters.

    I'm not sure that paragraph makes any sense, but any ideas?

    --
    StainlessSteelRat "Even in my dreams, I know I'm an idiot who knows he's going to wake up to
    reality." -- David Aames, Vanilla Sky
     
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  2. Sandy Morton

    Sandy Morton Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, StainlessSteelRat
    <[email protected]> wrote:
    > OK, so it's not so much a noisy chain but I find that the chain and sprockets on the derailleur
    > (sorry I don't know the posh name!) seem rather noisy (clattery?), for lack of a better word(s).

    Adjusting the alignment of the chain should help - put the shifters in the central position on
    the front and rear changers and adjust with the small knurled adjuster at the rear until the
    noise stops.

    hth

    --
    A T (Sandy) Morton on the Bicycle Island In the Global Village http://www.sandymillport.fsnet.co.uk
     
  3. Dave Kahn

    Dave Kahn Guest

    "StainlessSteelRat" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...

    > I oil the chain once a month or so with TF2 (lubricant spray with Teflon) but it attracts a lot of
    > dirt (even though it is wiped down after oiling). I'm sure the dirt isn't helping matters.

    Oiling a dirty chain is the fastest way to wear it out. The first thing to do is to take a 12"
    ruler and measure a straight run of your chain along 24 links from rivet centre to rivet centre.
    Each link is
    1/2" so the 24 should measure 12" exactly. If a run of 24 measures more than 12 1/8" it is worn out
    and needs replacing. The sprockets will almost certainly need replacing too, and possibly the
    chainrings.

    Google in this group and in rec.bicycles.tech for chain maintenance. Also read Sheldon Brown on the
    topic. The problem with Sheldon's pages, however, is that they are so rich in irresistible links
    that it's very hard not to get sidetracked for about 3 hours. :)

    --
    Dave...
     
  4. Sandy Morton wrote:
    >> OK, so it's not so much a noisy chain but I find that the chain and sprockets on the derailleur
    >> (sorry I don't know the posh name!) seem rather noisy (clattery?), for lack of a better word(s).
    >
    > Adjusting the alignment of the chain should help - put the shifters in the central position on
    > the front and rear changers and adjust with the small knurled adjuster at the rear until the
    > noise stops.

    I am fairly sure it's not an alignment issue (sorry, I should have mentioned this). It's simply that
    the running of the chain through the derailleur sprockets and perhaps the chain itself are just
    particularly noisy at the moment. Hence I was wondering if something needs some additional
    maintenance.

    --
    StainlessSteelRat "I have had people walk out on me before, but not when I was being so charming."
    -- Rick Deckard, Blade Runner
     
  5. Dave Kahn wrote:
    >> I oil the chain once a month or so with TF2 (lubricant spray with Teflon) but it attracts a lot
    >> of dirt (even though it is wiped down after oiling). I'm sure the dirt isn't helping matters.
    >
    > Oiling a dirty chain is the fastest way to wear it out. The first thing to do is to take a 12"
    > ruler and measure a straight run of your chain along 24 links from rivet centre to rivet centre.
    > Each link is
    > 1/2" so the 24 should measure 12" exactly. If a run of 24 measures more than 12 1/8" it is worn
    > out and needs replacing. The sprockets will almost certainly need replacing too, and possibly
    > the chainrings.

    OK, the bike is only 6 months old and hasn't been used dramatically, except in the last 2 months. Is
    it possible it could be worn out in this time?

    > Google in this group and in rec.bicycles.tech for chain maintenance. Also read Sheldon Brown on
    > the topic. The problem with Sheldon's pages, however, is that they are so rich in irresistible
    > links that it's very hard not to get sidetracked for about 3 hours. :)

    OK thanks for the information. I'll take a look.

    --
    StainlessSteelRat Confucius say: The wise speak when they have something to say, the fools speak
    when they have to say something.
     
  6. Guy Chapman

    Guy Chapman Guest

    "StainlessSteelRat" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...

    > OK, so it's not so much a noisy chain but I find that the chain and sprockets on the derailleur
    > (sorry I don't know the posh name!) seem rather noisy (clattery?), for lack of a better word(s).

    That sounds more like adjustment than anything else. This is what's known as a "Sheldon Crisis" -
    you point your browser at http://www.sheldonbrown.com and the image of a benign-looking gentleman
    who embodies the pinnacle of (cycling) wisdom of his age will appear to reassure you that this, too,
    has been foreseen, and there are detailed instructions on how to proceed from here.

    Sorry, posting under the influence of Dr Asmiov again...

    > On this basis I was after maintenance ideas for the chain at least, and ideally the rest of the
    > system. How often should I be oiling and greasing, and what should I oil and grease?

    For a good solid book on practical maintenance, see if you can find a second-hand copy of Richard's
    Bicycle Book by Richard Ballantine. The 21st Century Bicycle Book is more readable, but less
    helpful. The original has lots of pictures by John Batchelor and some nice clear instructions.

    My rule of thumb, though, is: oil anything that looks oily, and grease anything that looks greasy
    :) Never get WD40 within forty feet of a bike (it dissolves grease), and never oil a chain without
    cleaning it first.

    The things I oil weekly are: the derailleur idler spindles, derailleur pivots (front and rear), and
    brake pivots. I use wax-based lubricant so hardly ever clean the chain, but if you do need to clean
    the chain the Sheldon Shake is the Approved Method (see Sheldon's page on chains). Trust me: shaking
    your chain in a plastic bottle full of citrus degreaser and then rinsing it under a tap will do it a
    world of good.

    I used to clean the chains frequently before I used wax, now I hardly ever do. I strip, clean and
    grease any cup and cone bearings (wheels, headsets) once a year, and I wipe excess crud from the
    frame at least twice a year, whether it needs it or not. After a muddy ride on the MTB I hose it
    down, apply a liberal coating of oil to the rust-prone bits and store in a cool dry bike shed.

    > I oil the chain once a month or so with TF2 (lubricant spray with Teflon) but it attracts a lot of
    > dirt (even though it is wiped down after oiling). I'm sure the dirt isn't helping matters.

    Yes, the anti-fling oil-based lubricants attract crap like nothing on earth. That's why I use wax
    (White Lightning Raceday, since you asked). It needs frequent reapplication, but it doesn't turn
    into grinding paste.

    These views may be held to be controversial :)

    Guy
     
  7. Call Me Bob

    Call Me Bob Guest

    On 23 Apr 2003 09:25:09 -0700, [email protected] (Guy Chapman) wrote:

    >I use wax-based lubricant

    I need a new bottle of lube and have been considering trying a wax one. Which do you use Guy?

    Bob
    --
    Mail address is spam trapped To reply by email remove the beverage
     
  8. Tim Hall

    Tim Hall Guest

    On Wed, 23 Apr 2003 08:17:25 +0000 (UTC), "StainlessSteelRat" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Sandy Morton wrote:
    >>> OK, so it's not so much a noisy chain but I find that the chain and sprockets on the derailleur
    >>> (sorry I don't know the posh name!) seem rather noisy (clattery?), for lack of a better word(s).
    >>
    >> Adjusting the alignment of the chain should help - put the shifters in the central position on
    >> the front and rear changers and adjust with the small knurled adjuster at the rear until the
    >> noise stops.
    >
    >
    >I am fairly sure it's not an alignment issue (sorry, I should have mentioned this). It's simply
    >that the running of the chain through the derailleur sprockets and perhaps the chain itself are
    >just particularly noisy at the moment. Hence I was wondering if something needs some additional
    >maintenance.

    After a bit of maintenance (took chain off, stripped rear mech down etc) I put it all back together
    and found things very clattery. I'd routed the chain the wrong side of the tab on the rear mech that
    forms part of the cage. How stupid is that?

    Tim
    --

    fast and gripping, non pompous, glossy and credible.
     
  9. Just Zis Guy

    Just Zis Guy Guest

    On Wed, 23 Apr 2003 22:16:35 +0100, Call me Bob <[email protected]> wrote:

    >>I use wax-based lubricant

    >I need a new bottle of lube and have been considering trying a wax one. Which do you use Guy?

    White Lightning Raceday. It's a bit less clean that standard WL but seems to last a bit longer in
    wet weather. I'm working on the assumption that the weather will stay dry until I put summer lube on
    and leave my waterproof at home.

    Guy
    ===
    ** WARNING ** This posting may contain traces of irony. http://www.chapmancentral.com (BT ADSL and
    dynamic DNS permitting)
    NOTE: BT Openworld have now blocked port 25 (without notice), so old mail addresses may no longer
    work. Apologies.
     
  10. Pete Biggs

    Pete Biggs Guest

    Call me Bob wrote:

    > I need a new bottle of lube and have been considering trying a wax one.

    Most are extremely expensive considering they cost £5 or £10 for a little tiny bottle that doesn't
    last long. I seriously wonder if it wouldn't be cheaper to buy a new chain every few weeks!

    I included some notes on Castrol/Halfords Chain Wax in my reply to the "Best way to clean
    chain" thread.

    ~PB
     
  11. Guy Chapman

    Guy Chapman Guest

    "Pete Biggs" <pLime{remove_fruit}@biggs.tc> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...

    > Most are extremely expensive considering they cost £5 or £10 for a little tiny bottle that doesn't
    > last long. I seriously wonder if it wouldn't be cheaper to buy a new chain every few weeks!

    I generally get two to three months' worth out of a bottle of WL Raceday, maintaining nine lengths
    of chain on five bikes, with one or two bikes being used daily. But I will investigate cheaper chain
    wax, especially for summer use.
     
  12. Call Me Bob

    Call Me Bob Guest

    On Wed, 23 Apr 2003 22:37:18 +0100, "Just zis Guy, you know?" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >White Lightning Raceday. It's a bit less clean that standard WL but seems to last a bit longer in
    >wet weather.

    Thanks, I'll give it a try, see how I find it.

    Thanks also Pete for the tip about the Halfords/Castrol stuff. The only trouble I can see is I'm
    going to have to clean my chain before trying the wax. Maintenance? On the hack? Pfft!

    Bob
    --
    Mail address is spam trapped To reply by email remove the beverage
     
  13. On Wed, 23 Apr 2003 21:03:52 +0100, contributor Tim Hall had scribed:
    > After a bit of maintenance (took chain off, stripped rear mech down etc) I put it all back
    > together and found things very clattery. I'd routed the chain the wrong side of the tab on the
    > rear mech that forms part of the cage. How stupid is that?
    >

    BTDTBTTS, just hope nobody else noticed! I found out when I replaced the freehub (unrelated problem)
    a couple weeks after a new chain.

    Gary

    --

    The email address is for newsgroups purposes only and therefore unlikely to be read.

    For contact via email use my real name with an underscore separator at the domain of CompuServe.
     
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