Noisy Rolfs

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Bbear505, Feb 19, 2004.

  1. Bbear505

    Bbear505 Guest

    I'm sure this has been asked before, but how can I get into the freehub off some Rolf Vector Pros so
    that I can grease that noisy freehub? I remember seeing a post awhile back where Peter from
    Vecchio's said to tap out the axle or something to that effect. How do you first remove that silver
    dust cap? Any help appreciated.

    thanks, Ernie
     
    Tags:


  2. > I'm sure this has been asked before, but how can I get into the freehub
    off
    > some Rolf Vector Pros so that I can grease that noisy freehub? I remember seeing a post awhile
    > back where Peter from Vecchio's said to tap out the
    axle
    > or something to that effect. How do you first remove that silver dust
    cap?
    > Any help appreciated.

    Best way to pull off the axle cap is with a hub vise (which is basically a device with two half-
    circles that you put into your vise and gently clamp down onto the axle cap). Second best would be
    to simply pull it off with some pliers; the impressions you'll make won't be visible when the wheel
    is in the frame.

    You don't need to remove the cassette from the ratcheting mechanism on the Vector Pro. The entire
    thing simply pulls off of the hub as one unit.

    Do keep in mind that you need a special grease for that particular cassette mechanism. We've
    tried alternatives, but haven't found anything that works as well as the special Hugi grease. Not
    cheap stuff (about $10 for a very small tub, if I recall correctly), but it takes very little to
    do the job.

    --Mike-- Chain Reaction Bicycles http://www.ChainReactionBicycles.com
     
  3. bbear-<< I'm sure this has been asked before, but how can I get into the freehub off some Rolf
    Vector Pros so that I can grease that noisy freehub? I remember seeing a post awhile back where
    Peter from Vecchio's said to tap out the axle or something to that effect. How do you first remove
    that silver dust cap?
    >><BR><BR>

    very thin something to pry it off and the freehub just slides off, nothing but the frameset really
    holding it on. Be careful to not goop the inside too much cuz if the rising disc, doesn't, you will
    freewheel forward, making for a nasty crash.

    Peter Chisholm Vecchio's Bicicletteria 1833 Pearl St. Boulder, CO, 80302
    (303)440-3535 http://www.vecchios.com "Ruote convenzionali costruite eccezionalmente bene"
     
  4. Flatline

    Flatline Guest

    Just to supplement Mike's and Peter's comments, there are some pretty
    good PDF files on hub maintenance available at the Hugi web site.
    They contains some information and photos on disassembly. I think the
    correct file is http://www.dtswiss.com/uploads/files/MAN_EN_40114093188.pdf

    I tried to dissassemble my wheel on my own, but I could not bring myself to force the hub apart
    because I was afraid of breaking something. I ended up taking the wheeel into a LBS to relube the
    hub. It only cost $14, which seemed reasonable. The hub is reasonably quieter, but the technician
    says it will get noisier after a while as the grease spins away.
    r.b.
     
  5. Carl Fogel

    Carl Fogel Guest

    "Mike Jacoubowsky" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...

    [snip]

    > Do keep in mind that you need a special grease for that particular cassette mechanism. We've
    > tried alternatives, but haven't found anything that works as well as the special Hugi grease. Not
    > cheap stuff (about $10 for a very small tub, if I recall correctly), but it takes very little to
    > do the job.
    >
    > --Mike-- Chain Reaction Bicycles http://www.ChainReactionBicycles.com

    Dear Mike,

    Does this Hugi grease-tub list any special properties, or can you tell that the stuff is different
    in some way by just sticking a finger in it?

    Is it slipperier, thicker, non-corrosive, water-repelling, more tenacious, non-allergenic, good for
    watches, used to lubricate tank treads, or what?

    You've found that it works as well, but now I want to know what you mean--no squeaking, smoother
    shifting, lasts longer, spins easier?

    Have you tried this good stuff for other uses, like greasing air pumps (there were posts about high-
    pressure pump grease), or is it just special-purpose?

    Intrigued,

    Carl Fogel
     
  6. Bryanb

    Bryanb Guest

    You can take the silver dust cap off by placing the small protruding end into a vise and simply
    pulling it straight off. Will probably leave some slight marring on it, but no big deal. There are
    no special tools available or needed to take this off.

    Rock Shock's Judy Butter is light weight and works fine. Just use a fine amount and smear it around
    the hub. With dry riding conditions, should last the season.

    "BBear505" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >
    >
    > I'm sure this has been asked before, but how can I get into the freehub
    off
    > some Rolf Vector Pros so that I can grease that noisy freehub? I remember seeing a post awhile
    > back where Peter from Vecchio's said to tap out the
    axle
    > or something to that effect. How do you first remove that silver dust
    cap?
    > Any help appreciated.
    >
    > thanks, Ernie
     
  7. Carl:

    > Does this Hugi grease-tub list any special properties, or can you tell that the stuff is different
    > in some way by just sticking a finger in it?

    Originally I believe it had a "Moly-Kote" description, but the current stuff I'm getting comes in
    nondescript tiny white tubes with nothing other than "Trek synthetic grease kit for star ratchets
    only" part #232154. And an even-higher price at $19.99. Maybe one ounce of grease.

    > Is it slipperier, thicker, non-corrosive, water-repelling, more tenacious, non-allergenic, good
    > for watches, used to lubricate tank treads, or what?

    Pretty expensive stuff to lube tank treads with! It's not too thick, mildly tacky, dark
    gray in color.

    > You've found that it works as well, but now I want to know what you mean--no squeaking, smoother
    > shifting, lasts longer, spins easier?

    It quiets the ratchet assembly down and obviously has good lubrication characteristics, since it's
    rare that you ever have to replace any of the ratchet mechanism components. And fortunately you need
    very little grease to do the job; one tiny tub will probably lube 20 hubs, perhaps many more.

    > Have you tried this good stuff for other uses, like greasing air pumps (there were posts about high-
    > pressure pump grease), or is it just special-purpose?

    Too expensive! I'm trying to run down possible generic alternatives as I type (meaning that I'm
    waiting for a reply to an email I sent earlier).

    --Mike-- Chain Reaction Bicycles www.ChainReaction.com
     
  8. BBear505

    BBear505 Guest

    Thanks everyone for the tips. The DT link was great. I'll keep in mind about the special grease. An
    alternative to the half circle jaws would be some V-jaws. Would probably not leave any marks and
    doubles the grip of just using pliers or just using a regular vise. thanks again.

    Ernie
     
  9. Try looking at Lubriplate 630-2. Works great in Rolf/Hugi hub mechanisms. Works great as a general
    shop grease. Wonderful in hub bearings too.

    I believe 630-2 was developed for Caterpillar to lube the tread hinges. Has a Timken rating of 65,
    really good at separating 2 metal surfaces under pressure.

    Costs about $3 for a 14 ounce cylinder. I get mine from a bearing supply house.

    Bruce

    "Mike Jacoubowsky/Chain Reaction Bicycles" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Carl:
    >
    > > Does this Hugi grease-tub list any special properties, or can you tell that the stuff is
    > > different in some way by just sticking a finger in it?
    >
    > Originally I believe it had a "Moly-Kote" description, but the current
    stuff
    > I'm getting comes in nondescript tiny white tubes with nothing other than "Trek synthetic
    > grease kit for star ratchets only" part #232154. And an even-higher price at $19.99. Maybe one
    > ounce of grease.
    >
    > > Is it slipperier, thicker, non-corrosive, water-repelling, more tenacious, non-allergenic, good
    > > for watches, used to lubricate tank treads, or what?
    >
    > Pretty expensive stuff to lube tank treads with! It's not too thick,
    mildly
    > tacky, dark gray in color.
    >
    > > You've found that it works as well, but now I want to know what you mean--no squeaking, smoother
    > > shifting, lasts longer, spins easier?
    >
    > It quiets the ratchet assembly down and obviously has good lubrication characteristics, since it's
    > rare that you ever have to replace any of the ratchet mechanism components. And fortunately you
    > need very little grease to do the job; one tiny tub will probably lube 20 hubs, perhaps many more.
    >
    > > Have you tried this good stuff for other uses, like greasing air pumps (there were posts about
    > > high-pressure pump grease), or is it just special-purpose?
    >
    > Too expensive! I'm trying to run down possible generic alternatives as I type (meaning that I'm
    > waiting for a reply to an email I sent earlier).
    >
    > --Mike-- Chain Reaction Bicycles www.ChainReaction.com
     
  10. > Try looking at Lubriplate 630-2. Works great in Rolf/Hugi hub mechanisms. Works great as a general
    > shop grease. Wonderful in hub bearings too.
    >
    > I believe 630-2 was developed for Caterpillar to lube the tread hinges.
    Has
    > a Timken rating of 65, really good at separating 2 metal surfaces under pressure.

    Bruce: Your recommendation may be worth a try; I ran it past someone at TREK who thought it
    has potential. I wouldn't use it on one of our customer's bikes until I tested it on my own
    first though.

    Thanks-

    --Mike-- Chain Reaction Bicycles www.ChainReaction.com

    "Bruce Gilbert" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Try looking at Lubriplate 630-2. Works great in Rolf/Hugi hub mechanisms. Works great as a general
    > shop grease. Wonderful in hub bearings too.
    >
    > I believe 630-2 was developed for Caterpillar to lube the tread hinges.
    Has
    > a Timken rating of 65, really good at separating 2 metal surfaces under pressure.
    >
    > Costs about $3 for a 14 ounce cylinder. I get mine from a bearing supply house.
    >
    > Bruce
    >
    >
    > "Mike Jacoubowsky/Chain Reaction Bicycles" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > Carl:
    > >
    > > > Does this Hugi grease-tub list any special properties, or can you tell that the stuff is
    > > > different in some way by just sticking a finger in it?
    > >
    > > Originally I believe it had a "Moly-Kote" description, but the current
    > stuff
    > > I'm getting comes in nondescript tiny white tubes with nothing other
    than
    > > "Trek synthetic grease kit for star ratchets only" part #232154. And an even-higher price at
    > > $19.99. Maybe one ounce of grease.
    > >
    > > > Is it slipperier, thicker, non-corrosive, water-repelling, more tenacious, non-allergenic,
    > > > good for watches, used to lubricate tank treads, or what?
    > >
    > > Pretty expensive stuff to lube tank treads with! It's not too thick,
    > mildly
    > > tacky, dark gray in color.
    > >
    > > > You've found that it works as well, but now I want to know what you mean--no squeaking,
    > > > smoother shifting, lasts longer, spins easier?
    > >
    > > It quiets the ratchet assembly down and obviously has good lubrication characteristics, since
    > > it's rare that you ever have to replace any of
    the
    > > ratchet mechanism components. And fortunately you need very little
    grease
    > > to do the job; one tiny tub will probably lube 20 hubs, perhaps many
    more.
    > >
    > > > Have you tried this good stuff for other uses, like greasing air pumps (there were posts about
    > > > high-pressure pump grease), or is it just special-purpose?
    > >
    > > Too expensive! I'm trying to run down possible generic alternatives as
    I
    > > type (meaning that I'm waiting for a reply to an email I sent earlier).
    > >
    > > --Mike-- Chain Reaction Bicycles www.ChainReaction.com
    > >
    >
     
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