Noisy V Brakes

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by John & Karen, Jun 21, 2003.

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  1. John & Karen

    John & Karen Guest

    I've got a new bike from Halfords and the V brakes are very noisy and give a howling sound. They are
    effective however.

    What is causing this noise and how can it be stopped ?

    Thanks

    John
     
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  2. Jim Price

    Jim Price Guest

    John & Karen wrote:
    > I've got a new bike from Halfords and the V brakes are very noisy and give a howling sound. They
    > are effective however.
    >
    > What is causing this noise and how can it be stopped ?

    Things that can cause squealing V brakes are rumoured to be legion. I have heard: Dirty rims Pad
    contamination Not having the brake shoes 'toed in' a tad Insufficient rigidity or too much play in
    various parts of the brakes construction Having Shimano LX or XT 'parallel push' V brakes at all

    So, sorting out the above problems more or less in order _may_ leave you with non-squealing brakes.
    Clean 'em is the obvious solution for dirty rims/pads. I use a degreaser solution and kitchen towel
    for this, others use allsorts (cue Bassetts joke). Adding rigidity is usually achieved by a 'brake
    booster' plate, but in my opinion, these are as expensive as a set of decent V brake calipers
    online. One I haven't seen mentioned is filing the leading edge of the brake blocks off at 45
    degrees by about a couple of mm.

    If that lot fails to work, do a search for brakes at: http://www.sheldonbrown.com or wait for the
    rest of the crowd normally resident here to get back from their weekend away in York.

    If you do stop them squealing, make sure you have a bell.

    --
    Jim Price

    http://www.jimprice.dsl.pipex.com

    Conscientious objection is hard work in an economic war.

    Aye!.
     
  3. Peter B

    Peter B Guest

    "John & Karen" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I've got a new bike from Halfords and the V brakes are very noisy and give
    a
    > howling sound. They are effective however.
    >
    > What is causing this noise and how can it be stopped ?

    This is from an earlier thread: "Adjusting v-brakes"

    I find an easy way to set new pads is to unhook the cable and springs, the arms are now free. With
    the new pads fitted but left loose I then press the arm so the pad engages the rim, you can then
    tweak the pad so it's face is presented flat to the rim, the ball & socket thingie allows the pad
    to articulate into position. Place a bit of thin card under the trailing edge of the pad between it
    and the rim before tightening, this helps prevent brake squeal.

    Note the bit about using thin card under the trailing edge, this sets the pads with an amount of
    toe-in so when applied they are pulled forward and the full face of the pad bears on the rim. If
    they are initially set flat or toed out when applied the pad is pulled forward until its' face is
    no longer flat against the rim, the pads then lose grip as their surface area is reduced and spring
    back, this happens at high speed creating the high frequency squeal that warns peds of your
    approach :)

    http://www.parktool.com/repair_help/howfix_linearbrakes.shtml for more help.

    Pete
     
  4. Gary

    Gary Guest

    I used to hate the squeaking brakes, now I use them as my horn. My bike was serviced at Edi Bikes
    last week and let me tell you, these breaks are LOUD. They are also very efficient for stopping :)

    Thanks,

    Gary.
     
  5. Sandy Morton

    Sandy Morton Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, John & Karen <[email protected]> wrote:
    > What is causing this noise and how can it be stopped ?

    Try adjusting them for a small amount of toe-in, clean the rims with nail varnish remover, acetone
    or similar and lightly buff the running side of the block with emery paper. As a second last
    resort try a different type of block and as an absolute last resort buy some cotton wool to stuff
    in your ears:)

    --
    A T (Sandy) Morton on the Bicycle Island In the Global Village http://www.sandymillport.fsnet.co.uk
     
  6. Worth remembering that, in the excellent advice that you've received here, 'trailing' and 'leading'
    edges of the brake blocks are with respect to the direction of rim movement, i.e. the trailing edge
    is that towards the front of the bike, and the leading edge towards the rear (assuming that you
    spend most of your time cycling forwards). Confusion here could lead to compounding the problem
    (from experience!).

    "John & Karen" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I've got a new bike from Halfords and the V brakes are very noisy and give
    a
    > howling sound. They are effective however.
    >
    > What is causing this noise and how can it be stopped ?
    >
    > Thanks
    >
    > John
     
  7. Peter B

    Peter B Guest

    "Lionel Scales" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Worth remembering that, in the excellent advice that you've received here, 'trailing' and
    > 'leading' edges of the brake blocks are with respect to the direction of rim movement, i.e. the
    > trailing edge is that towards the
    front
    > of the bike, and the leading edge towards the rear (assuming that you
    spend
    > most of your time cycling forwards). Confusion here could lead to compounding the problem (from
    > experience!).

    Guilty m'lud :) I've taken the trailing edge in relation to the bikes (normal) direction, not the
    wheels. OPs please note.

    Pete
     
  8. John Redman

    John Redman Guest

    Surely(and no Shirley jokes) you've got it the wrong way round, the leading edge is towards the
    front of the bike and the blocks should be toed in.

    John R

    "Lionel Scales" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Worth remembering that, in the excellent advice that you've received here, 'trailing' and
    > 'leading' edges of the brake blocks are with respect to the direction of rim movement, i.e. the
    > trailing edge is that towards the
    front
    > of the bike, and the leading edge towards the rear (assuming that you
    spend
    > most of your time cycling forwards). Confusion here could lead to compounding the problem (from
    > experience!).
    >
    > "John & Karen" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > I've got a new bike from Halfords and the V brakes are very noisy and
    give
    > a
    > > howling sound. They are effective however.
    > >
    > > What is causing this noise and how can it be stopped ?
    > >
    > > Thanks
    > >
    > > John
    > >
    > >
    >
     
  9. "John Redman" <[email protected]> wrote: ( Surely(and no Shirley jokes) you've got it
    the wrong way round, the leading ) edge is towards the front of the bike and the blocks should
    be toed in.

    That, Shirley, is exactly the sort of mystification that makes it difficult for novices to
    understand. You can only remember, with confidence, which way round to do thing like that by
    understanding why you're doing it; and whilst it's easy to see why you should toe-out a brake block
    to stop it squealing it can be exceedingly difficult to see why everyone else calls it toeing in.
     
  10. Taywood

    Taywood Guest

    "Geraint Jones" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > "John Redman" <[email protected]> wrote: ( Surely(and no Shirley jokes) you've got it the
    > wrong way round, the
    leading
    > ) edge is towards the front of the bike and the blocks should be toed
    in.
    >
    > That, Shirley, is exactly the sort of mystification that makes it
    difficult
    > for novices to understand. You can only remember, with confidence,
    which way
    > round to do thing like that by understanding why you're doing it; and
    whilst
    > it's easy to see why you should toe-out a brake block to stop it
    squealing
    > it can be exceedingly difficult to see why everyone else calls it
    toeing in.

    Its the leading edge of the brake pad which must hit the rim first when braking. So starting from a
    point when the pad is parallel to the rim the trailing edge is moved out the one mm or so distance.
    You may have moved the back end out but the front end is now toed in. Mike
     
  11. Mike "Taywood" <[email protected]> wrote: ( "Geraint Jones"
    <[email protected]> wrote ) in message
    news:[email protected]... ( > "John Redman" <[email protected]> wrote: ) > (
    Surely(and no Shirley jokes) you've got it the wrong way round, the leading ( > ) edge is towards
    the front of the bike and the blocks should be toed in. ) > ( > That, Shirley, is exactly the sort
    of mystification that makes it difficult ) > for novices to understand. You can only remember, with
    confidence, which way ( > round to do thing like that by understanding why you're doing it; and
    whilst ) > it's easy to see why you should toe-out a brake block to stop it squealing ( > it can be
    exceedingly difficult to see why everyone else calls it toeing in. ) ( Its the leading edge of the
    brake pad which must hit the rim first when ) braking. So starting from a point when the pad is
    parallel to the rim ( the trailing edge is moved out the one mm or so distance. ) You may have moved
    the back end out but the front end is now toed in.

    That is exactly what I mean by mystification. Thank you. First of all you have to get me to agree to
    call what is obviously the back of the block its leading edge just because it is nearer to the front
    of the bike. And then you have to put the metaphorical person whose toes these are that are turned
    inwards facing forwards, instead of being backwards (and upside down) as any sane person would be
    when trying to see the waves in the surface of the block that give rise to the squeal. It's weird.

    The obvious way up for the metaphorical person to be is with his head at the centre of the wheel and
    legs pointing radially outwards, and running along the inside surface of the rim to cancel out the
    rotation of the wheel (and keep his feet where the blocks are). That way round it's obvious that he
    needs to grip the rim with his heels to prevent his shoes from squealing. And no, it doesn't matter
    if we put him (or indeed her) the right way up on the outside of the rim, although he may well bump
    his head on the inside of the tyre.

    What would you call this adjustment on the back wheel of a bike that has the brakes mounted on the
    chain stay? In that case both "ends" of the brake block are equally far from the front of the bike.
     
  12. Just as an attempt to clear up all these posts, put the piece of card (I use about 1mm thick, but
    that is thicker than most people use I think) under the brake block on the end closest to the rear
    of the bike.

    This lets the end of the brake block closest to the front of the bike hit first and as the top of
    rim is travelling forward it will pull the other end
    in.

    The words Trailing edge and Leading edge deliberatly left out :eek:)

    --
    David Brown :eek:) http://kitemap.co.uk
     
  13. Peter B

    Peter B Guest

  14. zebra

    zebra Guest

    My V-brakes (Shimano M-system Acera from memory) squeal and no amount of toeing-in or using my
    preferred KoolStop pads will stop the noise (though it used to). I've noticed the levers are a bit
    loose in the bushes (and tightening the bolt won't change this) and suspect worn bushes after four
    years. Anyone had a similar experience/advice before I change the brakes? Thanks
     
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