Non-cooked, simple food is healthiest

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by [email protected], Mar 10, 2006.

  1. It seems the best food isn't cooked much or is cooked in a plain
    manner. Oatmeal is just oats plus water. Likewise, Shredded Wheat is
    only whole wheat with no added sugar, etc. Add a few blueberries,
    strawberries or banana to that and it makes a very nutritious
    breakfast. Lactose-free fat-free milk adds essentially no fat. You
    don't need to add salt either. Salads and fruit are best just as they
    are without adding dressing or cheese or croutons.

    Most people agree that a potato is good food until you fry it or mash
    it and add salt and butter and milk to it. Then it becomes high
    calorie, high fat and probably less healthy. It is better just
    microwaved, boiled or baked, period.

    Part of the problem seems to be that people understand that simple
    unprocessed food is best, but there are social pressures especially
    within families to eat otherwise. When your wife/husband prides
    themselves as a cook, it becomes a personal insult to them if you do
    not eat their food, never mind the fact that everyone in the family is
    overweight. Kids feel cheated if you do not take them to McDonalds,
    etc.

    Groups like this have great intentions. Sharing recipes, etc. That is
    part of the live to eat mentality however. I'll say it anyway. A
    simple, vegetarian, low-salt, low-fat, low calorie diet high in whole
    grains, fruit, vegetables and fiber is the healthiest way to eat. This
    involves almost no cooking at all.
     
    Tags:


  2. Why not do both..live a long time and enjoy life including eating. Food
    preference is just that. If you do not eat meat for a couple of weeks,
    it begins to smell rotten to you, for example. Yes, there is evidence
    that a high-fat diet suggested by eggs, dairy, meat is not good for
    you. You can eat egg whites and throw away the yolk though, and drink
    nonfat milk and eat very little meat. Then you don't have to call
    yourself a vegetarian.
     
  3. Do you eat the thing, or dig a hole, bury it and place a headstone?
     
  4. zxcvbob

    zxcvbob Guest

    [email protected] wrote:
    > Why not do both..live a long time and enjoy life including eating. Food
    > preference is just that. If you do not eat meat for a couple of weeks,
    > it begins to smell rotten to you, for example. Yes, there is evidence
    > that a high-fat diet suggested by eggs, dairy, meat is not good for
    > you. You can eat egg whites and throw away the yolk though, and drink
    > nonfat milk and eat very little meat. Then you don't have to call
    > yourself a vegetarian.
    >



    Or I can still eat fish and chicken and call my self a vegetarian just
    to annoy people.

    Best regards,
    Bob
     
  5. jmcquown

    jmcquown Guest

    [email protected] wrote:
    > Most people agree that a potato is good food until you fry it or mash
    > it and add salt and butter and milk to it. Then it becomes high
    > calorie, high fat and probably less healthy. It is better just
    > microwaved, boiled or baked, period.
    >

    Who are "most people"? I'd like to meet them. I'd also like to meet the
    person who eats baked potatoes without adding some butter, sour cream or
    even some other additions.

    > Part of the problem seems to be that people understand that simple
    > unprocessed food is best, but there are social pressures especially
    > within families to eat otherwise.
    >

    Social pressures to eat? Huh. Never would have thunk it.

    > Groups like this have great intentions. Sharing recipes, etc. That is
    > part of the live to eat mentality however. I'll say it anyway. A
    > simple, vegetarian, low-salt, low-fat, low calorie diet high in whole
    > grains, fruit, vegetables and fiber is the healthiest way to eat. This
    > involves almost no cooking at all.


    If you don't like cooking why are you here? You aren't going to convert
    anyone to vegetarianism if they like to eat meat by making such postings
    here. We have a few contributors who don't eat meat but they also don't
    subsist on raw veggies and uncooked, either. And you're fooling yourself if
    you think Shredded Wheat hasn't been processed. Perhaps you should learn to
    read a few labels.

    Jill
     
  6. Anthony

    Anthony Guest

    [email protected] wrote:

    > A
    > simple, vegetarian, low-salt, low-fat, low calorie diet high in whole
    > grains, fruit, vegetables and fiber is the healthiest way to eat. This
    > involves almost no cooking at all.


    If that's how you want to eat fine, but perhaps you should avoid making
    unsupported and dogmatic statements. Probably no diet suits everybody
    and we in the developed world have a huge number of choices; each of us
    has to decide what to to believe out of all the conflicting studies and
    what balance to strike in our own lives. I eat almost no starchy
    vegetables, fruit, grains, sugar or processed foods, I enjoy what I eat
    and my labs, body fat ( 8% ) and blood pressure all suggest that I'm in
    very good shape. Perhaps I drink a little more wine than I should, but
    in my seventh decade I feel entitled!
     
  7. I was going to agree with you until I noticed your *second* error,
    which makes me think you're intentionally trying to mislead us.

    First, if you microwave, boil or bake a potato, it's considered
    COOKING. Second, oatmeal isn't "oats plus water." It's either "oats
    plus boiling water plus lots and lots of time," or it's
    "overly-processed oats plus boiling water." Third, you're against
    salad dressing. Even assuming olive oil isn't actually *good* for you,
    what's the problem with, say, lime juice? Ginger juice? Vinegar?
    Mixed with herbs, naturally. Something still called "salad dressing."

    Obviously, then, you need to think about your argument a *little* more.

    Personally, I'm a fan of simple, unprocessed foods . . . which doesn't
    mean I don't need a cookbook. Almost every day I eat broccoli,
    carrots, red peppers, butternut squash, and a whole grain or two
    (looove wheat berries). Frankly, though, it gets a bit dull to eat
    them plain, uncooked, and by themselves. (The butternut squash is
    particularly difficult.) Chopping them up and tossing them with, say,
    lime juice, cumin, cilantro and jalapenos makes them much more
    interesting, and, oddly, doesn't change them into -- AIEEEE! --
    "cooked" food.

    Which is why I've got several hundred natural, vegetarian, nearly
    fat-free soup and salad recipes. And, if I needed to find more, I'd
    come to a newsgroup like this, where the people are by and large
    knowledgeable, friendly, and helpful.
     
  8. Dee Randall

    Dee Randall Guest

    "jmcquown" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > [email protected] wrote:
    >> Most people agree that a potato is good food until you fry it or mash
    >> it and add salt and butter and milk to it. Then it becomes high
    >> calorie, high fat and probably less healthy. It is better just
    >> microwaved, boiled or baked, period.
    >>

    > Who are "most people"? I'd like to meet them. I'd also like to meet the
    > person who eats baked potatoes without adding some butter, sour cream or
    > even some other additions.


    Meekly -- meeee!
    Squeek, squeek,
    Dee Dee
     
  9. [email protected] writes:

    >"overly-processed oats plus boiling water." Third, you're against
    >salad dressing. Even assuming olive oil isn't actually *good* for you,
    >what's the problem with, say, lime juice? Ginger juice? Vinegar?
    >Mixed with herbs, naturally. Something still called "salad dressing."


    I love pico de gallo on my salads instead of dressing. I can't wait
    until we get some good tomatoes at the local markets so I can make a
    batch.
    I would consider making pico de gallo "cooking" even if I don't warm
    up a pan or oven to make it. You have to prepare it per a recipe,
    anyways. And I love potatoes, but they have to have SOMETHING on them.
    A little olive oil and kosher salt on the outside when baked, maybe.
    "Non-cooked" potatoes will make you sick as a dog, anyways.

    Stacia
     
  10. jmcquown <[email protected]> wrote:
    : [email protected] wrote:
    : <snip> I'd also like to meet the
    : person who eats baked potatoes without adding some butter, sour cream or
    : even some other additions.

    Here I am
    And I don't do it for 'health' reasons.

    Actually I haven't baked potatoes in the way I *really* like
    them in a long time. They would horrify not only most people
    on this newsgroup, but the original poster of the thread as well.
    I like to bake a potato until it's completely withered, so that
    there almost isn't anything inside, just a crisp brown skin...and
    I can't imagine anything that could make it taste better, except
    a bit of salt.
    --thelma

    : Jill
     
  11. Doug Kanter

    Doug Kanter Guest

    "jmcquown" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > [email protected] wrote:
    >> Most people agree that a potato is good food until you fry it or mash
    >> it and add salt and butter and milk to it. Then it becomes high
    >> calorie, high fat and probably less healthy. It is better just
    >> microwaved, boiled or baked, period.
    >>

    > Who are "most people"? I'd like to meet them. I'd also like to meet the
    > person who eats baked potatoes without adding some butter, sour cream or
    > even some other additions.


    Just pepper here. If you bake a potato The Good Way, it concentrates the
    flavor, and you don't need to doctor it up.
     
  12. I eat potatoes without putting anything on them. I also eat cooked
    oatmeal without adding anything else. What you are describing is what I
    call the dog turd theory of food. If you start with a dog turd and add
    sugar, cinnamon and butter to it, it might be palatable. Could it be
    that some people really don't like potatoes, but just the stuff they
    put on it?

    "Most people" in this case are everyone posting here so far including
    you who are hostile to vegetarianism I guess and prefer nonsimple
    foods. Not a problem. I just like simple food best and think its better
    for me. I also do not cook unless heating oatmeal in the microwave is
    called cooking. I'm pretty healthy far as I know, too.
     
  13. Hey, I like them that way too. An oven baked potato with a crisp potato
    skin is really good.
     
  14. Doug Kanter

    Doug Kanter Guest

    <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Hey, I like them that way too. An oven baked potato with a crisp potato
    > skin is really good.
    >


    But, you said "non-cooked" in your subject line.
     
  15. Actually, rolled oats are not processed. They are whole oats that have
    been rolled so they cook quicker, then they are boiled in water and
    dried, so that they can be prepared more quickly. There is nothing else
    in Quaker oats except oats. Same with shredded wheat. Everything other
    cereal you see on the breakfast aisle including those that say 100%
    this or that, are made FROM whole oats, whole wheat or bran, etc. but
    they contain lots of other things. Oatmeal and shredded wheat are not
    processed food, IMO any more than canned green beans are. If the
    ingredients list says green beans are because they have been boiled and
    canned.
     
  16. Dee Randall

    Dee Randall Guest

    <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >I eat potatoes without putting anything on them. I also eat cooked
    > oatmeal without adding anything else. What you are describing is what I
    > call the dog turd theory of food. If you start with a dog turd and add
    > sugar, cinnamon and butter to it, it might be palatable. Could it be
    > that some people really don't like potatoes, but just the stuff they
    > put on it?
    >
    > "Most people" in this case are everyone posting here so far including
    > you who are hostile to vegetarianism I guess and prefer nonsimple
    > foods. Not a problem. I just like simple food best and think its better
    > for me. I also do not cook unless heating oatmeal in the microwave is
    > called cooking. I'm pretty healthy far as I know, too.


    Are you talking to me? (Isn't that from Taxi Driver?)
    I'm not in the least hostile to vegetarianism.
    However, what's this dog turd theory? I'm hostile to that kind of
    description of food.
    Dee Dee
     
  17. > [W]e all seem to be opposed to the careless use of
    > words like "non-cooked"


    His post is mired in confusion, and rather than debate this, he should
    scurry home and not return until he can make sense. Because as another
    poster says, homemade salsa is *terrific* on a baked potato, and,
    contrary to OP's claim that simple food is healthiest, it's better for
    you than a *plain* baked potato. (Which, also contrary to an OP claim,
    is COOKED.)

    I ate very simple, marginally-cooked vegetarian food for years. I
    don't now because IT'S DULL AS DISHWATER. OP should have announced his
    allegiance to simple, low-fat foods and asked for recipes rather than
    paraded in like he was bearing Wonderful News for the high-fat heathens.
     
  18. Dee Randall

    Dee Randall Guest

    <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Hey, I like them that way too. An oven baked potato with a crisp potato
    > skin is really good.
    >

    OK, just to get you going again --haven't you heard that skin is really,
    really, really, really bad for you?
    GIYF,
    Dee Dee
     
  19. Doug Kanter

    Doug Kanter Guest

    <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >> [W]e all seem to be opposed to the careless use of
    >> words like "non-cooked"

    >
    > His post is mired in confusion, and rather than debate this, he should
    > scurry home and not return until he can make sense. Because as another
    > poster says, homemade salsa is *terrific* on a baked potato, and,
    > contrary to OP's claim that simple food is healthiest, it's better for
    > you than a *plain* baked potato. (Which, also contrary to an OP claim,
    > is COOKED.)


    Every time you eat salsa on a baked potato, you add one year to your life.
    I'm 52. I had the aforementioned food combination a year ago. This proves my
    theory (if you squint and never took a science class).
     
  20. Doug Kanter

    Doug Kanter Guest

    <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Actually, rolled oats are not processed. They are whole oats that have
    > been rolled so they cook quicker, then they are boiled in water and
    > dried, so that they can be prepared more quickly. There is nothing else
    > in Quaker oats except oats. Same with shredded wheat. Everything other
    > cereal you see on the breakfast aisle including those that say 100%
    > this or that, are made FROM whole oats, whole wheat or bran, etc. but
    > they contain lots of other things. Oatmeal and shredded wheat are not
    > processed food, IMO any more than canned green beans are. If the
    > ingredients list says green beans are because they have been boiled and
    > canned.
    >


    Rolled + boiled = processed. Sorry.
     
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