Non-cooked, simple food is healthiest

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by [email protected], Mar 10, 2006.

  1. zxcvbob

    zxcvbob Guest

    [email protected] wrote:
    > Actually, rolled oats are not processed. They are whole oats that have
    > been rolled so they cook quicker, then they are boiled in water and
    > dried, so that they can be prepared more quickly. There is nothing else
    > in Quaker oats except oats. Same with shredded wheat. Everything other
    > cereal you see on the breakfast aisle including those that say 100%
    > this or that, are made FROM whole oats, whole wheat or bran, etc. but
    > they contain lots of other things. Oatmeal and shredded wheat are not
    > processed food, IMO any more than canned green beans are. If the
    > ingredients list says green beans are because they have been boiled and
    > canned.
    >




    Perhaps you need to either use the right terminology (like maybe
    "minimally processed"?) or else define the terms that you've hijacked.

    Best regards,
    Bob
     


  2. Peter Aitken

    Peter Aitken Guest

    <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >I eat potatoes without putting anything on them. I also eat cooked
    > oatmeal without adding anything else. What you are describing is what I
    > call the dog turd theory of food. If you start with a dog turd and add
    > sugar, cinnamon and butter to it, it might be palatable. Could it be
    > that some people really don't like potatoes, but just the stuff they
    > put on it?
    >


    It's telling that you have to insult and denigrate other people to make your
    point.

    There is some validity to your last sentence, however. I have seen many
    people who won't eat a baked potato unless it is drowned in butter, sour
    cream, bacon bits, cheese, and so on. But covering up a flavor is not the
    same as enhancing it, and the art of cooking over the centuries has been an
    effort to discover complementary flavor combinations. Your approach gives
    you a few hundred flavors, perhaps. My approach gives me tens if not
    hundreds of thousands. Guess who is ahead?

    If you had merely posted "this is how I like to eat" you would not have had
    so many hostile responses. But you posted "this is how I like to eat and it
    is superior to any other way."

    Peter Aitken
     
  3. jay

    jay Guest

    On Fri, 10 Mar 2006 08:24:28 -0800, dkw12002 wrote:

    > I eat potatoes without putting anything on them. I also eat cooked
    > oatmeal without adding anything else. What you are describing is what I
    > call the dog turd theory of food. If you start with a dog turd and add
    > sugar, cinnamon and butter to it, it might be palatable. Could it be
    > that some people really don't like potatoes, but just the stuff they
    > put on it?
    >
    > "Most people" in this case are everyone posting here so far including
    > you who are hostile to vegetarianism I guess and prefer nonsimple
    > foods. Not a problem. I just like simple food best and think its better
    > for me. I also do not cook unless heating oatmeal in the microwave is
    > called cooking. I'm pretty healthy far as I know, too.



    In regard to your turd theory.. have you checked into what a microwave may
    do for you? If you really want to get into roulette.. do you drive a car?

    http://www.relfe.com/microwave.html

    I had my annual 5 year check up yesterday. The doctor I went to last time
    died. I have never seen a ..veg.. that looked healthy. We used to hire
    them but they always called in sick. What I like about the -veg- worst of
    all is they are always trying to convert others. When they lose the
    healthy argument they always "git going on PETA."

    Beef..it's what's for dinner.. <G>
     
  4. > haven't you heard that skin is really, really, really, really bad for you?

    Don't tell me I'm actually going to *learn* something in this thread.

    I thought potato skin was GOOD for you. Something about all the iron
    and minerals in dirt working their way into the skin.

    Wow: it's sounding stupid to me and nobody's even responded yet.
     
  5. > what's this dog turd theory?  I'm hostile to that kind of description of food.

    It's a disgusting version of the Escargot Theory: that is, you could
    cook a pencil eraser with butter and garlic and end up with something
    just as tasty.
     
  6. Dave Smith

    Dave Smith Guest

    Dee Randall wrote:

    >
    > OK, just to get you going again --haven't you heard that skin is really,
    > really, really, really bad for you?
    >


    They are??? There is a toxin in the eyes and in the greenish coloured skins
    of young potatoes, but I was under the impression that they were actually
    pretty good for you, and a quick Google search confirmed that.
     
  7. zxcvbob

    zxcvbob Guest

    Doug Kanter wrote:

    > <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >
    >>>haven't you heard that skin is really, really, really, really bad for
    >>>you?

    >>
    >>Don't tell me I'm actually going to *learn* something in this thread.
    >>
    >>I thought potato skin was GOOD for you. Something about all the iron
    >>and minerals in dirt working their way into the skin.
    >>
    >>Wow: it's sounding stupid to me and nobody's even responded yet.
    >>

    >
    >
    > A lot of the fungicides used on potato crops lodge in the skin.




    That's why I peel the potatoes and wrap them with chicken skin before
    baking.

    Bob

    P.S. That was meant as a joke, but it actually sounds *really good*.
    Now I'll have to try it.
     
  8. aem

    aem Guest

    [email protected] wrote:
    > It seems


    Good, start right out admitting you have no science to back up the
    claims to follow.

    >[snip] Salads and fruit are best just as they
    > are without adding dressing or cheese or croutons.


    "Best" meaning healthiest, apparently. Even if you could substantiate
    the health claims, there is more to eating than that.

    > Most people agree [snip]


    Actually, that's not so. People who agree with you constitute a tiny
    minority of the world's population.
    >
    > Part of the problem seems to be that people understand that simple
    > unprocessed food is best, but there are social pressures especially
    > within families to eat otherwise. [snip]


    I don't know of these social pressures. I do know of some individual's
    desire to appear knowledgeable and superior.
    >
    > Groups like this have great intentions. Sharing recipes, etc. That is
    > part of the live to eat mentality however. I'll say it anyway. A
    > simple, vegetarian, low-salt, low-fat, low calorie diet high in whole
    > grains, fruit, vegetables and fiber is the healthiest way to eat. This
    > involves almost no cooking at all.


    No cooking, and almost no thinking, either. -aem
     
  9. Peter Aitken

    Peter Aitken Guest

    "Dave Smith" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Dee Randall wrote:
    >
    >>
    >> OK, just to get you going again --haven't you heard that skin is really,
    >> really, really, really bad for you?
    >>

    >
    > They are??? There is a toxin in the eyes and in the greenish coloured
    > skins
    > of young potatoes, but I was under the impression that they were actually
    > pretty good for you, and a quick Google search confirmed that.
    >
    >
    >


    No comment about potato skins, but...

    Google searches confirm nothing. They turn up everything from the highest
    quality information on university and government sites to the most
    astounding dreck and twaddle published by flat-earthers, fundamentalists,
    and other treacle-brains. You can find support for any hair-brained theory
    by using Google. Unless you have the ability to evaluate the source of
    information--which very few people do--it's pretty useless.


    --
    Peter Aitken
     
  10. ~patches~

    ~patches~ Guest

    jmcquown wrote:

    > [email protected] wrote:
    >
    >>Most people agree that a potato is good food until you fry it or mash
    >>it and add salt and butter and milk to it. Then it becomes high
    >>calorie, high fat and probably less healthy. It is better just
    >>microwaved, boiled or baked, period.
    >>

    >
    > Who are "most people"? I'd like to meet them. I'd also like to meet the
    > person who eats baked potatoes without adding some butter, sour cream or
    > even some other additions.


    I do when I'm sick. The insides of the potatoes calm my tummy when it's
    upset. Plain boild potatoes do the same thing.
    >
    >
    >>Part of the problem seems to be that people understand that simple
    >>unprocessed food is best, but there are social pressures especially
    >>within families to eat otherwise.
    >>

    >
    > Social pressures to eat? Huh. Never would have thunk it.


    I think my pressure to eat is to feel good ;) Being hungry isn't a
    whole lot of fun and really takes the enjoyment out of life.

    >
    >
    >>Groups like this have great intentions. Sharing recipes, etc. That is
    >>part of the live to eat mentality however. I'll say it anyway. A
    >>simple, vegetarian, low-salt, low-fat, low calorie diet high in whole
    >>grains, fruit, vegetables and fiber is the healthiest way to eat. This
    >>involves almost no cooking at all.

    >
    >
    > If you don't like cooking why are you here? You aren't going to convert
    > anyone to vegetarianism if they like to eat meat by making such postings
    > here. We have a few contributors who don't eat meat but they also don't
    > subsist on raw veggies and uncooked, either. And you're fooling yourself if
    > you think Shredded Wheat hasn't been processed. Perhaps you should learn to
    > read a few labels.


    While I agree with some of his/her theories about eating a lot of raw
    foods, I also eat a lot of cooked foods including meats. Sorry, I'm not
    about to give up steak for no one! But the OP can call me vegetarian if
    they want to since I do eat a fair amount of raw veggies each day but
    then I eat a fair amount of cooked veggies too. So I also wonder why
    the OP posted but maybe just to open up discussion. I have some pretty
    weird views on food so can understand how the OP's views may sound weird
    to some. Less cooking likely is healthier but those darn animals don't
    want to stand still while I take a bite out of their leg. IME if you
    cook them first, they tend to be a little more co-operative ;)
    >
    > Jill
    >
    >
     
  11. cathyxyz

    cathyxyz Guest

    [email protected] wrote:

    >
    > Groups like this have great intentions. Sharing recipes, etc. That is
    > part of the live to eat mentality however. I'll say it anyway. A
    > simple, vegetarian, low-salt, low-fat, low calorie diet high in whole
    > grains, fruit, vegetables and fiber is the healthiest way to eat. This
    > involves almost no cooking at all.
    >


    So... why are you posting this to rec.food.COOKING, if I may ask, politely?

    Cheers
    Cathy(xyz)
     
  12. Doug Kanter

    Doug Kanter Guest

    "cathyxyz" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:eek:[email protected]
    > [email protected] wrote:
    >
    >>
    >> Groups like this have great intentions. Sharing recipes, etc. That is
    >> part of the live to eat mentality however. I'll say it anyway. A
    >> simple, vegetarian, low-salt, low-fat, low calorie diet high in whole
    >> grains, fruit, vegetables and fiber is the healthiest way to eat. This
    >> involves almost no cooking at all.
    >>

    >
    > So... why are you posting this to rec.food.COOKING, if I may ask,
    > politely?
    >
    > Cheers
    > Cathy(xyz)


    Too logical, that question. :)
     
  13. ~patches~

    ~patches~ Guest

    [email protected] wrote:

    > I was going to agree with you until I noticed your *second* error,
    > which makes me think you're intentionally trying to mislead us.
    >
    > First, if you microwave, boil or bake a potato, it's considered


    Some consider microwaving worse than any other cooking method. There
    have been several articles on this. They often re-appear in health food
    store magazines.

    > COOKING. Second, oatmeal isn't "oats plus water." It's either "oats
    > plus boiling water plus lots and lots of time," or it's
    > "overly-processed oats plus boiling water." Third, you're against
    > salad dressing. Even assuming olive oil isn't actually *good* for you,
    > what's the problem with, say, lime juice? Ginger juice? Vinegar?
    > Mixed with herbs, naturally. Something still called "salad dressing."


    The things you mentioned may not occur to the OP as salad dressings. My
    favourite is a splash of fresh lemon juice. I'm not sure if I think of
    it as salad dressing or just another fruit/veggie component of the
    salad. OTOH, I have better things to do than to ponder the issue. You
    are quite right that so many things can be used to accentuate the
    flavour of salads besides the high sugar and fat bottled dressing in the
    stores.

    >
    > Obviously, then, you need to think about your argument a *little* more.
    >
    > Personally, I'm a fan of simple, unprocessed foods . . . which doesn't
    > mean I don't need a cookbook. Almost every day I eat broccoli,
    > carrots, red peppers, butternut squash, and a whole grain or two
    > (looove wheat berries). Frankly, though, it gets a bit dull to eat
    > them plain, uncooked, and by themselves. (The butternut squash is
    > particularly difficult.) Chopping them up and tossing them with, say,
    > lime juice, cumin, cilantro and jalapenos makes them much more
    > interesting, and, oddly, doesn't change them into -- AIEEEE! --
    > "cooked" food.
    >
    > Which is why I've got several hundred natural, vegetarian, nearly
    > fat-free soup and salad recipes. And, if I needed to find more, I'd
    > come to a newsgroup like this, where the people are by and large
    > knowledgeable, friendly, and helpful.
    >
     
  14. The irony of the whole post - you are actually advocating processed
    foods. Oatmeal, shredded wheat, microwaved potatoes are by no means
    "unprocessed"!! I am yet to see fat-free milk available naturally!!

    By the way, our family has been vegetarian and eating healthy for
    generations, but we have the usual share of family suffering from blood
    pressure, diabetes, heart disease, even a case or two of obesity(maybe
    the percentages are less than the general population. but so-called
    healthy folks have to eventually come down with something too:)).

    - Kamala.

    [email protected] wrote:
    > It seems the best food isn't cooked much or is cooked in a plain
    > manner. Oatmeal is just oats plus water. Likewise, Shredded Wheat is
    > only whole wheat with no added sugar, etc. Add a few blueberries,
    > strawberries or banana to that and it makes a very nutritious
    > breakfast. Lactose-free fat-free milk adds essentially no fat. You
    > don't need to add salt either. Salads and fruit are best just as they
    > are without adding dressing or cheese or croutons.
    >
    > Most people agree that a potato is good food until you fry it or mash
    > it and add salt and butter and milk to it. Then it becomes high
    > calorie, high fat and probably less healthy. It is better just
    > microwaved, boiled or baked, period.
    >
    > Part of the problem seems to be that people understand that simple
    > unprocessed food is best, but there are social pressures especially
    > within families to eat otherwise. When your wife/husband prides
    > themselves as a cook, it becomes a personal insult to them if you do
    > not eat their food, never mind the fact that everyone in the family is
    > overweight. Kids feel cheated if you do not take them to McDonalds,
    > etc.
    >
    > Groups like this have great intentions. Sharing recipes, etc. That is
    > part of the live to eat mentality however. I'll say it anyway. A
    > simple, vegetarian, low-salt, low-fat, low calorie diet high in whole
    > grains, fruit, vegetables and fiber is the healthiest way to eat. This
    > involves almost no cooking at all.
     
  15. ~patches~

    ~patches~ Guest

    Glitter Ninja wrote:

    > [email protected] writes:
    >
    >
    >>"overly-processed oats plus boiling water." Third, you're against
    >>salad dressing. Even assuming olive oil isn't actually *good* for you,
    >>what's the problem with, say, lime juice? Ginger juice? Vinegar?
    >>Mixed with herbs, naturally. Something still called "salad dressing."

    >
    >
    > I love pico de gallo on my salads instead of dressing. I can't wait
    > until we get some good tomatoes at the local markets so I can make a
    > batch.
    > I would consider making pico de gallo "cooking" even if I don't warm
    > up a pan or oven to make it. You have to prepare it per a recipe,
    > anyways. And I love potatoes, but they have to have SOMETHING on them.
    > A little olive oil and kosher salt on the outside when baked, maybe.
    > "Non-cooked" potatoes will make you sick as a dog, anyways.
    >
    > Stacia
    >


    Stacia, that is a good point! Some veggies can be eaten cooked or raw
    but others really need to be cooked. My list of really need to be
    cooked - turnips, rutabegas, parsnips, squashes, potatoes. I'm not sure
    if uncooked potatoes will make you sick. I've been known to pop a piece
    or two into my mouth when cutting potatoes up for cooking. I haven't
    suffered any ill effects but that doesn't mean it couldn't happen.
     
  16. [email protected] writes:

    >> haven't you heard that skin is really, really, really, really bad for you?


    >Don't tell me I'm actually going to *learn* something in this thread.


    >I thought potato skin was GOOD for you. Something about all the iron
    >and minerals in dirt working their way into the skin.


    >Wow: it's sounding stupid to me and nobody's even responded yet.


    I think Dee is being evil and mean to us. *pout* I thought potato
    skins were good, too. They have potassium and... I dunno, fiber or
    vitamins or aphrodesiacs or something. ;)

    Stacia
     
  17. [email protected] wrote:
    > It seems the best food isn't cooked much or is cooked in a plain
    > manner. .. A
    > simple, vegetarian, low-salt, low-fat, low calorie diet high in whole
    > grains, fruit, vegetables and fiber is the healthiest way to eat. This
    > involves almost no cooking at all.



    May I ask how old you are? And what general health problems run in your
    family?


    I ask because I've had a change of heart on this subject. At one time I
    subscribed to the idea that most health problems could be avoided with a
    diet something like the one you describe. Now I would say that the
    subject is vastly more complicated than that. The reason for my change
    in opinion comes down to:


    1. Noticing that it's not true.
    2. Getting older and getting some health problems myself.
    3. Talking to my parents who have some health problems themselves.


    I'm glad for the media attention to the connection between diet and
    nutrition on the one hand to health and longevity on the other. The
    problem I see with it is how easy it is to go making a recommendation
    based on the majority of participants in a study to making a
    recommendation for one particular human.


    Here's the classic example: The vast number of Americans eat too much
    and don't get enough exercise. This has been shown to be linked to
    heart disease which is a major health problem in America. Heart disease
    kills too many of us. That last statement too often gets shortened to:
    Everyone needs to cut down on their fat intake and exercise more. And
    that's just not true!


    There are many healthy diets. It depends on the individual. It's not
    just the individual's body type and nutritional needs. There are taste
    and desire needs too. Some of us are happy with rather plainly cooked
    food. Others of us go crazy without flavor and spice.


    The problem of finding something to be true for one group of people and
    applying the findings to a larger group is something the medical
    establishment and the counter-culture vegetarians can both be guilty of.


    Another example: You state that people who become vegetarians for a few
    weeks find that meat starts to smell rotten to them. I've seen
    variations on the claim that meat starts to make people sick when they
    eat it after a long abstinence. And yet I've known lots of people this
    hasn't applied to at all. I've been vegetarian on and off for long
    periods of my life, and when I've gone back to eating meat, it has
    tasted good and made me feel fine.


    --Lia
     
  18. Doug Kanter

    Doug Kanter Guest

    "Julia Altshuler" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]

    > I ask because I've had a change of heart on this subject. At one time I
    > subscribed to the idea that most health problems could be avoided with a
    > diet something like the one you describe. Now I would say that the
    > subject is vastly more complicated than that.


    The original Moosewood cookbook, a "vegetarian classic" from the late 1960s,
    was loaded with cheese and milk in its recipes, as sources of protein and
    variety in taste. Probably contributed to quite a few early deaths.


    > Another example: You state that people who become vegetarians for a few
    > weeks find that meat starts to smell rotten to them. I've seen variations
    > on the claim that meat starts to make people sick when they eat it after a
    > long abstinence. And yet I've known lots of people this hasn't applied to
    > at all. I've been vegetarian on and off for long periods of my life, and
    > when I've gone back to eating meat, it has tasted good and made me feel
    > fine.


    Some people get god-awful cramps if they don't eat cereal for a week, and
    then have a big bowl of something with serious fiber, like raisin bran.
     
  19. Doug Kanter

    Doug Kanter Guest

    "Bob Myers" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >
    >> Groups like this have great intentions. Sharing recipes, etc. That is
    >> part of the live to eat mentality however. I'll say it anyway. A
    >> simple, vegetarian, low-salt, low-fat, low calorie diet high in whole
    >> grains, fruit, vegetables and fiber is the healthiest way to eat. This
    >> involves almost no cooking at all.

    >
    > OK, so you don't wanna cook. That's fine for you, but
    > what on Earth are you doing HERE? Just trying to become
    > an evangelical non-cook, or what?
    >
    > Bob M.
    >
    >


    Just a guess, but do you remember The Whiners, from early Saturday Night
    Live episodes? They'd go into restaurants and immediately begin whining
    about their diverticulitis. The routine was enough to cause the illness. :)
     
  20. ~patches~

    ~patches~ Guest

    Peter Aitken wrote:

    > "zxcvbob" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >
    >>[email protected] wrote:
    >>
    >>>Why not do both..live a long time and enjoy life including eating. Food
    >>>preference is just that. If you do not eat meat for a couple of weeks,
    >>>it begins to smell rotten to you, for example. Yes, there is evidence
    >>>that a high-fat diet suggested by eggs, dairy, meat is not good for
    >>>you. You can eat egg whites and throw away the yolk though, and drink
    >>>nonfat milk and eat very little meat. Then you don't have to call
    >>>yourself a vegetarian.
    >>>

    >>
    >>
    >>Or I can still eat fish and chicken and call my self a vegetarian just to
    >>annoy people.
    >>
    >>Best regards,
    >>Bob

    >
    >
    > Hey you're annoying me <g>!
    >
    >

    He's not annoying me. He could eat jelly beans all day and call himself
    a clown for all I care :) Why people get hung up on labeling the way
    others eat is beyond me. If they just worried about their own diets and
    let others do as they choose, it would so pleasant.

    BTW, I'm a *vegetarian* but only for lunch and sometimes for dinner, a
    don't eat red meat on Fridays, worshipper of the holy garden, meateater
    the rest of the time - I just don't eat white flour, white sugar, corn
    syrup, commercially canned/processed most things, candy, fast food, and
    there's likely others. But I am *vegetarian*, really I am!
     
Loading...