non-stick frying pan



S

Smurfsdad

Guest
I'm just a occasional cooking Dad. I'm about to buy a new non-stick frying pan. Any suggestions or
things to watch for? Thanks, Jerry
 
N

Nancree

Guest
>I'm just a occasional cooking Dad. I'm about to buy a new non-stick frying pan. Any suggestions or
>things to watch for? Thanks,

-------------------------------------
They're great--just be sure to get one with a thick bottom. I like my "mirro" brand--but be careful--
they have both the thin cheapos and the thicker ones.
 
P

Penmart01

Guest
>"Smurfsdad" pled:
>
>I'm just a occasional cooking Dad. I'm about to buy a new non-stick frying pan. Any suggestions or
>things to watch for?

From the housewares aisle of your local stupidmarket seach out the cheapest nonstick pan you can
find (under $10). Sometimes the weekly circular even advertises them on sale for $4.99 or as
promotional items whereby each week a different piece of a cookware set is offered at a drastically
reduced price... usually the pan is free during the first week with a modest minimum purchase. A
fancy schmancy high end expensive nonstick pan won't last any longer nor will it cook the typical
things a nonstick pan cooks any better than your inexpensive version. After a couple-three years
when your under $10 pan starts looking shabby toss it and buy another cheapo nonstick pan, thirty
years from now you'll still be way ahead than had you wasted your dollars on the way overpriced
fancy delancy designer dreck. The worst enemy of nonstick cookware is high heat... so if you're
careful not to incinerate your pan and not abuse your pan with metal tools your el cheapo pan can
easily last a couple-three decades.

---= BOYCOTT FRENCH--GERMAN (belgium) =--- ---= Move UNITED NATIONS To Paris =--- Sheldon
```````````` "Life would be devoid of all meaning were it without tribulation."
 
Z

Zerocool

Guest
On Mon, 9 Feb 2004 19:24:03 -0600, "Smurfsdad" <[email protected]>
wrote:

>I'm just a occasional cooking Dad. I'm about to buy a new non-stick frying pan. Any suggestions or
>things to watch for? Thanks, Jerry
>
You can get a decently heavy, better than grocery store quality, Calphalon 10" nonstick skillet for
$15 + shipping. A good bang for your buck. I got the 12" one on sale for $30, and it works well. I
agree with the others, that nonstick will wear out on you, so no use buying the expensive ones. But
for a few bucks more, you can do alot better than the grocery store models. If you have a kitchen
supply store in your town, they also have thick nonsticks, cheep.
 
Z

Zxcvbob

Guest
Smurfsdad wrote:
> I'm just a occasional cooking Dad. I'm about to buy a new non-stick frying pan. Any suggestions or
> things to watch for? Thanks, Jerry
>
>

Buy T-Fal. (Even though they are made in France.) They are really nice, and if you catch them on
sale you can get just about any size frypan for about $10. My favorite is about a 12" skillet with
deep sides shaped kind-of-like a wok. I paid $10 for it on a *really* good sale. Actually, I went
back and bought a 2nd at that price and it's in storage until the first pan gets too ratty.

Bob
 
J

Jake

Guest
Smurfsdad wrote:
>
> I'm just a occasional cooking Dad. I'm about to buy a new non-stick frying pan. Any suggestions or
> things to watch for? Thanks, Jerry

Cooks Illustrated liked the Faberware Millenium $30-$40 and the Meyer Teflon II models the best. You
can get both at Bed Bath and Beyond. Just remember, to make them last longer don't ever expose them
to very high heat.

--
JaKe, Seattle "Feeling is more important than technique" John "Bonzo" Bonham
 
W

Wayne Jones

Guest
That's baloney. I have found that cheap thin teflon pans stick badly because they don't distribute
the heat evenly and have hot spots wheere the food burns on. Buy a decent pan. You don't have to
spend $100 but spend maybe $20 Wayne

"PENMART01" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]
m06.aol.com...
> >"Smurfsdad" pled:
> >
> >I'm just a occasional cooking Dad. I'm about to buy a new non-stick
frying
> >pan. Any suggestions or things to watch for?
>
> From the housewares aisle of your local stupidmarket seach out the
cheapest
> nonstick pan you can find (under $10). Sometimes the weekly circular even advertises them on sale
> for $4.99 or as promotional items whereby each
week a
> different piece of a cookware set is offered at a drastically reduced
price...
> usually the pan is free during the first week with a modest minimum
purchase.
> A fancy schmancy high end expensive nonstick pan won't last any longer nor
will
> it cook the typical things a nonstick pan cooks any better than your inexpensive version. After a
> couple-three years when your under $10 pan
starts
> looking shabby toss it and buy another cheapo nonstick pan, thirty years
from
> now you'll still be way ahead than had you wasted your dollars on the way overpriced fancy delancy
> designer dreck. The worst enemy of nonstick
cookware
> is high heat... so if you're careful not to incinerate your pan and not
abuse
> your pan with metal tools your el cheapo pan can easily last a
couple-three
> decades.
>
>
> ---= BOYCOTT FRENCH--GERMAN (belgium) =--- ---= Move UNITED NATIONS To Paris =--- Sheldon
> ```````````` "Life would be devoid of all meaning were it without tribulation."
 
B

Bud Holly

Guest
"PENMART01" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> >"Smurfsdad" pled:
> >
> >I'm just a occasional cooking Dad. I'm about to buy a new non-stick
frying
> >pan. Any suggestions or things to watch for?
>
> From the housewares aisle of your local stupidmarket seach out the
cheapest
> nonstick pan you can find (under $10).
<snip>

I heartily agree with this post. In fact I buy two or three and use them at will. Buy a some non
scratch utensils with the money you save over a $30-$40 pan.
 
E

EskWIRED

Guest
In rec.food.cooking, PENMART01 <[email protected]> wrote:

> A fancy schmancy high end expensive nonstick pan won't last any longer nor will it cook the
> typical things a nonstick pan cooks any better than your inexpensive version.

I usually pay attention to your posts, because I find that generally, you are correct. But this one
I wonder about.

I always thought that it was important to get a saute pan that distributed the heat evenly over the
bottom, to avoid hot spots. You indicate that a thin cheap pan made from whatever works just as good
as a thick aluminum pan.

Did I weigh your qualifier "the typical things a nonstick pan cooks" too lightly?

Personally, I don't use nonstick (except for one little saute pan I won in a chile-making contest)
so I'm no expert. I use my 25 pound slab of cast iron over two gas burners for stuff like frying
burgers and even for just making grilled cheese sandwiches. I like the even heat.

Can you expand on what the hell you are talking about?

--
...I'm an air-conditioned gypsy...

- The Who
 
L

Lorena

Guest
I agree with ZeroCool - buy a decent, but not too expensive pan, and it will last much much longer.
I've had a Calphalon nonstick for about 5 years, which is much longer than the 1-2 year Wal-mart
type I've bought before.

I've been pretty impressed with Calphalon non-sticks - you can even use metal utensils on them
(gently) without any harm to the finish, and burned on food will scrub right off if this ever
happens to you.

"ZeroCool" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> You can get a decently heavy, better than grocery store quality, Calphalon 10" nonstick skillet
> for $15 + shipping. A good bang for your buck. I got the 12" one on sale for $30, and it works
> well. I agree with the others, that nonstick will wear out on you, so no use buying the expensive
> ones. But for a few bucks more, you can do alot better than the grocery store models. If you have
> a kitchen supply store in your town, they also have thick nonsticks, cheep.
 
D

Donna Rose

Guest
In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
>Smurfsdad wrote:
>> I'm just a occasional cooking Dad. I'm about to buy a new non-stick frying pan. Any suggestions
>> or things to watch for? Thanks, Jerry
>>
>>
>
>Buy T-Fal. (Even though they are made in France.) They are really nice, and if you catch them on
>sale you can get just about any size frypan for about $10. My favorite is about a 12" skillet with
>deep sides shaped kind-of-like a wok. I paid $10 for it on a *really* good sale. Actually, I went
>back and bought a 2nd at that price and it's in storage until the first pan gets too ratty.
>
>Bob
>
Ross Stores and/or Marshall's are good places to look for bargains on these pans.
--
Donna A pessimist believes all women are bad. An optimist hopes they are.

To reply, remove the SPAM BLOCK
 
L

Levelwave©

Guest
Wayne Jones wrote:

> That's baloney. I have found that cheap thin teflon pans stick badly because they don't distribute
> the heat evenly and have hot spots wheere the food burns on. Buy a decent pan. You don't have to
> spend $100 but spend maybe $20

Right. Best $20.00 I ever spent... Perfect Eggs and/or Fish...

http://www.bigtray.com/productdetails.asp!sku.WEAZ4007,catid.16540.html

~john

--
Say hello to the rug's topography...It holds quite a lot of interest with your face down on it...
 
C

Charles Gifford

Guest
"Wayne Jones" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> That's baloney. I have found that cheap thin teflon pans stick badly because they don't distribute
> the heat evenly and have hot spots wheere the food burns on. Buy a decent pan. You don't have to
> spend $100 but spend maybe $20 Wayne

I agree with Sheldon on this one. Buy a cheap one at the supermarket. It will work just fine. When
the time comes in a couple or three years put it in the trash and buy a new one for under USD10.

Charlie
 
C

Charles Gifford

Guest
<[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> In rec.food.cooking, PENMART01 <[email protected]> wrote:
>
> > A fancy schmancy high end expensive nonstick pan won't last any longer
nor will
> > it cook the typical things a nonstick pan cooks any better than your inexpensive version.
>
> I usually pay attention to your posts, because I find that generally, you are correct. But this
> one I wonder about.
>
> I always thought that it was important to get a saute pan that distributed the heat evenly over
> the bottom, to avoid hot spots. You indicate that a thin cheap pan made from whatever works just
> as good as a thick aluminum pan.
>
> Did I weigh your qualifier "the typical things a nonstick pan cooks" too lightly?
>
> Personally, I don't use nonstick (except for one little saute pan I won in a chile-making contest)
> so I'm no expert. I use my 25 pound slab of cast iron over two gas burners for stuff like frying
> burgers and even for just making grilled cheese sandwiches. I like the even heat.
>
> Can you expand on what the hell you are talking about?
>
>
> --
> ...I'm an air-conditioned gypsy...
>
> - The Who

I'll tell you my experience. My latest under $10 frying pan from the supermarket is made by Revere
Ware. Not a brand that I would usually buy. But it was very inexpensive. It is made from thick
aluminum and has a non-stick coating. I've had it for over a year now and it is just as good as new.
I expect it to last for 3 or 4 more years. When it develops a scratch or two I will demote it to
second best. In several years I will demote the newest one to second best and toss my current one in
the trash with no regrets. I'd rather spend $15 to $18 dollars over a period of 8 or so years and
always have a perfect non-stick pan on hand than pay a heck of a lot more for one that will scratch
even sooner. I don't use non-stick pans except for a couple of frypans - mostly for eggs and a few
other items. I do have a Circulon wok that was given to me for Christmas last year. I like it very
much but do not expect it to be scratchless much longer. Then it will be back to my steel wok.

Charlie