NORBA rider killed in crash.

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by Howard, May 24, 2003.

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  1. Howard

    Howard Guest

    Hi there,

    I found the following on the bikemagic.com com site. Strangely enough I have seen no mention of it
    elsewhere. Now I don't suppose that this is because the story is not deeemed to be newsworthy given
    that the rider would have been wearing a helmet at the time (and probably a full face motorcycle
    style helmet at that)...

    FEATURES
    19 / 05 / 03

    NORBA Round 1 overshadowed by tragedy

    By Mike Davis

    This weekend saw the first round of the NORBA series, the US's premier MTB race series. And it got
    off to the worst possible start with the death of Japanese rider Haruko Fujinawa after a crash in
    practice on Saturday. The 33-year old from Kyoto was taken to a local hospital where she was
    pronounced dead.

    A moment's silence was held before racing and during the podium presentation in memory of Fujinawa.

    Regards,

    Howard.
     
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  2. Peter B

    Peter B Guest

    "Howard" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Hi there,
    >
    > I found the following on the bikemagic.com com site. Strangely enough I have seen no mention of it
    > elsewhere. Now I don't suppose that this is because the story is not deeemed to be newsworthy
    > given that the rider would have been wearing a helmet at the time (and probably a full face
    > motorcycle style helmet at that)...

    A Leicestershire man was killed a couple of weeks back riding off-road in Spain in what was
    described as a "freak accident" resulting in a broken neck. Then there is the sad incident of Russ
    Pinder being disabled after a mishap riding The Gap in Wales.

    A helmet only offers limited protection (sorry for stating the bleeding obvious) but IMO is
    worthwhile when mtbing if for nothing other than protecting your noggin' from low branches (altho'
    the increased height of the lid makes you more likely to contact them). A couple of weeks ago I
    landed on my helmet in a truly vertical manner resulting in a crunch that made me think either my
    glasses, face or neck had broken but in fact it was the detachable peak detaching :)

    Pete
     
  3. "Howard" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Hi there,
    >
    > I found the following on the bikemagic.com com site. Strangely enough I have seen no mention of it
    > elsewhere. Now I don't suppose that this is because the story is not deeemed to be newsworthy
    > given that the rider would have been wearing a helmet at the time (and probably a full face
    > motorcycle style helmet at that)...

    I don't think helmets have *anything* to do with it in this case - its just that nowadays it seems
    that people *accept* a certain number of *fatalities* (or serious injuries) as part of the
    "collateral damage" of competitive sport - especially where wheels and high speeds are involved.
    This seems to apply to any sport or this nature - be it cycling, motor racing or whatever.

    Lots of people are killed during sport - they only seem to make the papers if its a particularly
    spectacular accident (and covered by TV cameras) or the person is a celebrity outwith the circle of
    followers of that sport. I am sure if Lance Armstrong or Jan Ullrich had a fatal prang on this years
    Tour it would make front page news *everywhere*.

    And anyway sport is only something for the mainstream media to report on when there isn't enough war
    about. And we're still dealing with the fallout of a war, so some Japanese lady pranging isn't
    really thought of as anything of great import. After all she knew the risks, and there will always
    be someone else to take her place. It is seen as the same as a soldier falling in battle. (BTW this
    is me paraphrasing the media not trying to make light of what *is* a tragedy).

    Alex
     
  4. Howard

    Howard Guest

    I would argue that helemts have very much to do with the failure to report this crash. Consider the
    way even the UK gutter press reported the deaths of Andrei Kivilev and Casatelli, complete with
    pictures, neither of whome were well known riders like Armstrong. Reading many of those articles it
    was obvious that the writers were reporting the deaths simply in order to promote the view that any
    cyclist who does not wear a ploystyrene hat is courting death and only has themselves to blame if
    somebody runs then down and they are injured.

    UK drivers and even supposed 'road safety experts' have a very strong tendancy to greatly overstate
    the effectiveness of helmets and any story that challenges this view is tends to be buried, much as
    the NORBA fatality has. Why? because accepting this fact also entails accepting that improving road
    safety is all about improving driver behaviour, slowing vehicles down to lessen the consequences of
    any crash that occurs etc, and many are just not receptive to such a message...
     
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