Norco

Discussion in 'Mountain Bikes' started by Al McFarlane, May 13, 2003.

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  1. Al McFarlane

    Al McFarlane Guest

    I was looking at the Norco Sidewinder, anybody have anything good or bad to say about this
    bike? Thanks
     
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  2. In article <[email protected]>, "Al McFarlane"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I was looking at the Norco Sidewinder, anybody have anything good or bad to say about this
    > bike? Thanks

    Whoa. The Sidewinder is a very cheap full-suspension bike. It has low-end components throughout, and
    for the same money almost any hardtail would be a better deal.

    http://norco.com/bikes/2003bikes/sidewinder.htm

    What are your riding goals? If you're just hitting gravel "trails" and bike paths at the local park,
    you will be better-served by a hardtail in the same price range.

    Staying within Norco's line, something like the Mountaineer...is still a pretty low-end bike, but at
    least it has a half-decent frame and will weigh about 10 pounds less than the Sidewinder's crappy
    "hi-tensile" (bikespeak for "worst frame material") frame and avoids its useless low-grade rear
    suspension:

    http://norco.com/bikes/2003bikes/mountaineer.htm

    I would dare to take the Mountaineer out on a "real" MTB trail with some expectation that it
    wouldn't fold in half on general principles.

    Norco makes lots of good, high-end bikes above this range, probably starting with the Wolverine or
    somewhere around there. But the Sidewinder is just garbage so that they can offer their bike shop
    distributors a cheap competitor for Wal-Mart bikes.

    In this price range, the best deals are used bikes, followed by new hardtails.

    --
    Ryan Cousineau, [email protected] http://www.sfu.ca/~rcousine President, Fabrizio Mazzoleni Fan Club
     
  3. The 70'S

    The 70'S Guest

    Can you tell me what you think of the Norco Scrambler? I bought my son one 2 years ago, made of
    Chromoly, and we bought another one this year (another son) made of Aluminum.
    http://norco.com/bikes/2003bikes/scrambler.htm Thanks for your input.

    "Ryan Cousineau" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > In article <[email protected]>, "Al McFarlane"
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > I was looking at the Norco Sidewinder, anybody have anything good or bad
    to
    > > say about this bike? Thanks
    >
    > Whoa. The Sidewinder is a very cheap full-suspension bike. It has low-end components throughout,
    > and for the same money almost any hardtail would be a better deal.
    >
    > http://norco.com/bikes/2003bikes/sidewinder.htm
    >
    > What are your riding goals? If you're just hitting gravel "trails" and bike paths at the local
    > park, you will be better-served by a hardtail in the same price range.
    >
    > Staying within Norco's line, something like the Mountaineer...is still a pretty low-end bike, but
    > at least it has a half-decent frame and will weigh about 10 pounds less than the Sidewinder's
    > crappy "hi-tensile" (bikespeak for "worst frame material") frame and avoids its useless low-grade
    > rear suspension:
    >
    > http://norco.com/bikes/2003bikes/mountaineer.htm
    >
    > I would dare to take the Mountaineer out on a "real" MTB trail with some expectation that it
    > wouldn't fold in half on general principles.
    >
    > Norco makes lots of good, high-end bikes above this range, probably starting with the Wolverine or
    > somewhere around there. But the Sidewinder is just garbage so that they can offer their bike shop
    > distributors a cheap competitor for Wal-Mart bikes.
    >
    > In this price range, the best deals are used bikes, followed by new hardtails.
    >
    > --
    > Ryan Cousineau, [email protected] http://www.sfu.ca/~rcousine President, Fabrizio Mazzoleni Fan Club
     
  4. In article <[email protected]>, "The 70's" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > > Norco makes lots of good, high-end bikes above this range, probably starting with the Wolverine
    > > or somewhere around there. But the Sidewinder is just garbage so that they can offer their bike
    > > shop distributors a cheap competitor for Wal-Mart bikes.
    > >
    > > In this price range, the best deals are used bikes, followed by new hardtails.

    > Can you tell me what you think of the Norco Scrambler? I bought my son one 2 years ago, made of
    > Chromoly, and we bought another one this year (another son) made of Aluminum.
    > http://norco.com/bikes/2003bikes/scrambler.htm Thanks for your input.

    Well, it's a hardtail, which is good. The frame is not in their top line, and the components (Altus
    and worse) are below the range I would consider for my bike. The fork is heavy and undamped.

    But for a kid? unless he's racing XC or hucking 5-footers, no problem. I hear from people who know
    better that Shimano's low-end stuff is fairly durable in practice. This bike is already more capable
    than any number of horrid Dunlop 747s or whatever the local version of "dual-sus" department-store
    wretchedness is in your area. The greatest weakness isprobably the fork, but that can be upgraded as
    a reward when your son makes his school's XC team. 7 speeds is obsolete technology, but I race an
    ancient Marin with 7-speed and an elastomer fork, and I beat people on lighter, newer bikes. The
    only impediment is that descending is scary because the fork is wretched and I have no technique.

    --
    Ryan Cousineau, [email protected] http://www.sfu.ca/~rcousine President, Fabrizio Mazzoleni Fan Club
     
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