Northwest ends its bikes fly free program with Adventure Cycling

Discussion in 'rec.bicycles.rides archive' started by Amh, Jan 23, 2003.

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  1. Amh

    Amh Guest

    Hi,

    The United thread just reminded me that I received an e-mail from Adventure Cycling that Northwest
    is ending it's bikes fly free program for members.

    This is the age where the airlines are going to squeeze the passenger for every cent they can.

    Andy
     
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  2. Alan

    Alan Guest

    So what part of this do you not understand? Companies are free to raise or lower their prices, and
    you're free to utilize their services or not. The airlines are sqeezing their customers, their
    suppliers, and their employees in an effort to regain profitability. Their investors expect to see
    some return on their money, after all.

    Airline stocks that were in the $50-60 range two years ago are now selling for around $5. Since
    they're such a bargain, perhaps you could buy a big bloc of them, and use your new-found clout to
    tell the companies how to make a profit by selling tickets at a loss. If you can do that, I'm sure
    that American, United, USAir, Delta, and a host of others will be knocking on your door.

    --

    alan

    Anyone who believes in a liberal media has never read the "Daily Oklahoman."

    "amh" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Hi,
    >
    > The United thread just reminded me that I received an e-mail from Adventure Cycling that Northwest
    > is ending it's bikes fly free program for members.
    >
    > This is the age where the airlines are going to squeeze the passenger for every cent they can.
    >
    > Andy
     
  3. Maybe they should charge for ALL checked luggage, and maybe start charging for the peanuts too!

    --

    Steve Juniper ([email protected])

    "Tests show that a frog will passively remain in a very slowly heated frying pan until killed.
    We are now conducting that experiment with ourselves on this planet with the Bush junta turning
    up the heat."
    S.Juniper

    "alan" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > So what part of this do you not understand? Companies are free to raise
    or
    > lower their prices, and you're free to utilize their services or not. The airlines are sqeezing
    > their customers, their suppliers, and their
    employees
    > in an effort to regain profitability. Their investors expect to see some return on their money,
    > after all.
    >
    > Airline stocks that were in the $50-60 range two years ago are now selling for around $5. Since
    > they're such a bargain, perhaps you could buy a big bloc of them, and use your new-found clout to
    > tell the companies how to
    make
    > a profit by selling tickets at a loss. If you can do that, I'm sure that American, United, USAir,
    > Delta, and a host of others will be knocking on your door.
    >
    > --
    >
    > alan
    >
    > Anyone who believes in a liberal media has never read the "Daily
    Oklahoman."
    >
    >
    > "amh" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > Hi,
    > >
    > > The United thread just reminded me that I received an e-mail from Adventure Cycling that
    > > Northwest is ending it's bikes fly free program for members.
    > >
    > > This is the age where the airlines are going to squeeze the passenger for every cent they can.
    > >
    > > Andy
     
  4. Amh

    Amh Guest

    "alan" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > So what part of this do you not understand? Companies are free to raise or lower their prices, and
    > you're free to utilize their services or not. The airlines are sqeezing their customers, their
    > suppliers, and their employees in an effort to regain profitability. Their investors expect to see
    > some return on their money, after all.
    >
    > Airline stocks that were in the $50-60 range two years ago are now selling for around $5. Since
    > they're such a bargain, perhaps you could buy a big bloc of them, and use your new-found clout to
    > tell the companies how to make a profit by selling tickets at a loss. If you can do that, I'm sure
    > that American, United, USAir, Delta, and a host of others will be knocking on your door.
    >
    > --
    >
    > alan

    I understand all of it.

    What I don't understand is why cyclists are singled out. Golfers traveling with golf clubs that
    weigh more than my bike are not charged extra. Skiers are not charged extra for their ski bags. Even
    though the ski bag is not counted in the 2 piece baggage limit.

    I've seen folks checking in with more weight and greater volume of baggage than I have with my boxed
    bike and panniers. And don't give me the line that the airlines take more care when the handlers see
    a bike box. I've seen my bike box tossed around.

    Yes airlines are losing money. But what do you expect from a company who can charge $900 for one
    seat and $300 for the next seat over.

    Its simple charge what it costs to move that seat to its destination. Add your profit margin and
    "extras" such as food and beverage, and you've figured out what the fare is. If you can't fill the
    plane then use a smaller plane or cancle the service.

    Andy

    >
    > Anyone who believes in a liberal media has never read the "Daily Oklahoman."
    >
    >
    > "amh" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > Hi,
    > >
    > > The United thread just reminded me that I received an e-mail from Adventure Cycling that
    > > Northwest is ending it's bikes fly free program for members.
    > >
    > > This is the age where the airlines are going to squeeze the passenger for every cent they can.
    > >
    > > Andy
     
  5. Matt O'Toole

    Matt O'Toole Guest

    "Steve Juniper" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...

    > Maybe they should charge for ALL checked luggage, and maybe start charging for the peanuts
    > too!

    I'd gladly pay a little extra, if I knew for sure it would get there when I
    did. Until then, call me Captain Carry-on...

    Matt O.
     
  6. Alan

    Alan Guest

    (from an AMR site last updated in Jan 2002. Charges have increased.)

    Sports items

    Certain items, such as skis and golf clubs, will be accepted as one item under the free allowance.
    Some restrictions may apply outside the United States. The following items are free in place of one
    62 inch/157 cm bag in the free baggage allowance: archery, backpacks, boogie/knee boards, bowling
    equipment, fishing equipment, hockey/lacrosse sticks, shooting equipment, skateboards, and
    snowboards.

    Excess charges always apply to: antlers, bicycles, scuba tanks, surfboards, wind surfing equipment,
    and hang gliding equipment.

    (snip)

    Sports Equipment

    Sports items must be packed to withstand normal handling. If connecting to another airline, the
    other airline's charges also apply. Service Charges - One way only

    The following items are free if in place of 62 in. bag. If in addition to allotment, US$50 excess
    charge applies.

    Archery Equipment Hockey/LaCross Stick Bowling Equipment Backpack with frame Shooting equipment Ski
    Equipment Boogieboard/Knee Board Skateboard Fishing Equipment Snowboard Golf Equipment

    The following items are never free for travel from the US/Canada to the Caribbean and Mexico and may
    never be substituted for a free bag. Excess charge always applies. Antlers $50 Scuba Tank $50
    Bicycle $50 Surfboard $75 Box for Bike $20 Windsurfing Equip. $75 Bag for Bike $10 Hang-gliding
    Equip. $75

    It would appear the cyclists are merely paying for oversize baggage like any other passenger. I
    suspect that skis are way beyong the 62 inch limit, but when airlines routinely fill planes with ski
    groups heading to popular destinations, it makes sense to accomodate them. When was the last time a
    group of cyclists had a big charter trip? Airlines go where the money is, and I'm afraid that
    catering to cyclists just isn't profitable.

    --

    alan

    Anyone who believes in a liberal media has never read the "Daily Oklahoman."

    "amh" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > "alan" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...

    > > --
    > >
    > > alan
    >
    > I understand all of it.
    >
    > What I don't understand is why cyclists are singled out. Golfers traveling with golf clubs that
    > weigh more than my bike are not charged extra. Skiers are not charged extra for their ski bags.
    > Even though the ski bag is not counted in the 2 piece baggage limit.
    >
    > I've seen folks checking in with more weight and greater volume of baggage than I have with my
    > boxed bike and panniers. And don't give me the line that the airlines take more care when the
    > handlers see a bike box. I've seen my bike box tossed around.
    >
    > Yes airlines are losing money. But what do you expect from a company who can charge $900 for one
    > seat and $300 for the next seat over.
    >
    > Its simple charge what it costs to move that seat to its destination. Add your profit margin and
    > "extras" such as food and beverage, and you've figured out what the fare is. If you can't fill the
    > plane then use a smaller plane or cancle the service.
    >
    > Andy
     
  7. Amh

    Amh Guest

    "alan" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > (from an AMR site last updated in Jan 2002. Charges have increased.)
    >
    <snip>
    >
    > It would appear the cyclists are merely paying for oversize baggage like any other passenger. I
    > suspect that skis are way beyong the 62 inch limit, but when airlines routinely fill planes with
    > ski groups heading to popular destinations, it makes sense to accomodate them. When was the last
    > time a group of cyclists had a big charter trip? Airlines go where the money is, and I'm afraid
    > that catering to cyclists just isn't profitable.
    >
    > --
    >
    > alan

    You certainly made your point. I don't mind being squeezed a bit but the airlines, I think, are
    going overboard on charges. They should make their profit on the fares not "service charges". If I
    were charged an extra $80 on the airfare I'd think that $40 charge each way to take the bike would
    be worth it.

    I just looked up info for flights to New Orleans from NYC for May. One airline charges over $1000
    and another $300. Both flights were with a Saturday night stay and were not direct in coach class.
    If you went to the supermarket and saw a gallon of ice cream for $3 you'd wonder what is so
    wonderful about the ice cream that was selling for $10 a gallon.

    I'm going to learn to pack my bike into 2 luggage sized boxes.

    Andy
     
  8. Alan

    Alan Guest

    We have two local groceries that sell the same brand of ice cream. One store charges about
    $3.50/gallon, and the other about $5. So who do we buy from?

    Seriously, the 2 box idea is good, but rmember that they both count toward your baggage allowance.
    It may be a better idea to ship the bike via FedEx or UPS. I looked on the FedEx site last night,
    but couldn't determine if they'd ship something as large as a bike. They WILL ship a large, heavy
    air conditioner, as I learned last summer, but size is an iimportant factor. I came across a sports
    specialty shipping site too, so look around. LAB has (or had) a bikes fly free program, but I
    believe it was limited to just a few airlines. One other thought, and that's to send it via a bus
    line. They carry freight too, but you'll have to go to a bus terminal to pick it up.

    --

    alan

    Anyone who believes in a liberal media has never read the "Daily Oklahoman."

    "amh" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > "alan" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > > (from an AMR site last updated in Jan 2002. Charges have increased.)
    > >
    > <snip>
    > >
    > > It would appear the cyclists are merely paying for oversize baggage like
    any
    > > other passenger. I suspect that skis are way beyong the 62 inch limit,
    but
    > > when airlines routinely fill planes with ski groups heading to popular destinations, it makes
    > > sense to accomodate them. When was the last time
    a
    > > group of cyclists had a big charter trip? Airlines go where the money
    is,
    > > and I'm afraid that catering to cyclists just isn't profitable.
    > >
    > > --
    > >
    > > alan
    >
    > You certainly made your point. I don't mind being squeezed a bit but the airlines, I think, are
    > going overboard on charges. They should make their profit on the fares not "service charges". If I
    > were charged an extra $80 on the airfare I'd think that $40 charge each way to take the bike would
    > be worth it.
    >
    > I just looked up info for flights to New Orleans from NYC for May. One airline charges over $1000
    > and another $300. Both flights were with a Saturday night stay and were not direct in coach class.
    > If you went to the supermarket and saw a gallon of ice cream for $3 you'd wonder what is so
    > wonderful about the ice cream that was selling for $10 a gallon.
    >
    > I'm going to learn to pack my bike into 2 luggage sized boxes.
    >
    > Andy
     
  9. alan wrote:

    > We have two local groceries that sell the same brand of ice cream. One store charges about
    > $3.50/gallon, and the other about $5. So who do we buy from?
    >
    > Seriously, the 2 box idea is good, but rmember that they both count toward your baggage allowance.
    > It may be a better idea to ship the bike via FedEx or UPS. I looked on the FedEx site last night,
    > but couldn't determine if they'd ship something as large as a bike. They WILL ship a large, heavy
    > air conditioner, as I learned last summer, but size is an iimportant factor. I came across a
    > sports specialty shipping site too, so look around. LAB has (or had) a bikes fly free program, but
    > I believe it was limited to just a few airlines. One other thought, and that's to send it via a
    > bus line. They carry freight too, but you'll have to go to a bus terminal to pick it up.
    >

    FedEx will ship a bicycle so long as it is under a specific dimension (go to UPS.COM and it if fits
    for UPS it will fit for FedEx). As a rule of thumb, one of those hard-shell cases is designed to
    meet the dimensions. If you're willing to risk shipping w/o insurance, it can be relatively
    inexpensive for ground service (maybe $25 between middle of the U.S. and a coast, with a few
    thousand dollars of insurance costing another $10 (UPS charges a bit more, but with UPS a supervisor
    crushes the box rather than having some hourly temp damage it like at FedEx so you get what you pay
    for)). Air service is more expensive, with next day priority delivery running around $175. I suspect
    that now they are x-raying all baggage with subsequent optional searching, it is a lot simpler to
    ship the bicycle than to check it as luggage.

    -Bill Asher
     
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