nose feel shocked when doing somersault under water

Discussion in 'General Fitness' started by Author, Sep 15, 2003.

  1. Author

    Author Guest

    I'm a newbie here. I'm not a regular swimmer either.

    'shocked' isn't the right word. but I don't know a better word to describe the feeling.

    It happens when I do a somersault under water. My body goes head down, and somehow water gets into
    the nostrils. That's when it happens. The impact centers at my nose and reaches my eyes and the back
    of my head. It hurts even after I complete the somersault and have my head out of water. I have to
    give about 20 to 30 seconds to allow the feeling to go away. It happens every time I do it.

    I checked with other people (they aren't expert swimmer either). They say they don't get
    that feeling.

    Somehow I found if I hold my nose with one hand, the feeling isn't that obvious. But then I won't
    be able to do a perfect somersault. My body would rotate sideways. So what's going on for me and
    how to solve it?
     
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  2. Rtk

    Rtk Guest

    Exhale forcibly through your nose as you flip.

    rtk
     
  3. Dakitty

    Dakitty Guest

    "author" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > I'm a newbie here. I'm not a regular swimmer either.
    >
    > 'shocked' isn't the right word. but I don't know a better word to describe the feeling.
    >
    > It happens when I do a somersault under water. My body goes head down, and somehow water gets
    > into the nostrils. That's when it happens. The impact centers at my nose and reaches my eyes and
    > the back of my head. It hurts even after I complete the somersault and have my head out of
    > water. I have to give about 20 to 30 seconds to allow the feeling to go away. It happens every
    > time I do it.

    Exhale while turning. Getting into summersault, hold your breath for a moment, till you start going
    up-side down (before the water starts going in) then start exhalig vigorously, through your nose. No
    water can get in while the air is coming out. Once you're back to horizontal, proceed as usual.

    > I checked with other people (they aren't expert swimmer either). They say they don't get that
    > feeling.

    Pool or ocean water inside your sinuses and on nasal membranes always hurts. The trick is to not get
    the water in there.
     
  4. Brian D

    Brian D Guest

    On 1 Sep, author <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Somehow I found if I hold my nose with one hand, the feeling isn't that obvious. But then I won't
    > be able to do a perfect somersault. My body would rotate sideways. So what's going on for me and
    > how to solve it?

    As I tell my younger swimmers - hum.
    --
    B D
     
  5. author wrote:
    >
    > I'm a newbie here. I'm not a regular swimmer either.
    >
    > 'shocked' isn't the right word. but I don't know a better word to describe the feeling.
    >
    > It happens when I do a somersault under water.

    Just exhale through your nose a bit all the way through the tumble. All you have to do is keep
    positive air pressure in your nose while it is under water. That is normal anyway. You don't
    actually hold your breath as you swim. You begin to exhale, mostly through your mouth, but a little
    through your now, as soon as you stop inhaling.

    martin

    --
    Martin Smith email: [email protected] Vollsveien 9 tel. : +47 6783 1188
    P.O. Box 482 mob. : +47 932 48 303 1327 Lysaker, Norway
     
  6. Author

    Author Guest

    On Mon, 1 Sep 2003 13:50:53 -0700, "DaKitty" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    >"author" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >> I'm a newbie here. I'm not a regular swimmer either.
    >>
    >> 'shocked' isn't the right word. but I don't know a better word to describe the feeling.
    >>
    >> It happens when I do a somersault under water. My body goes head down, and somehow water gets
    >> into the nostrils. That's when it happens. The impact centers at my nose and reaches my eyes and
    >> the back of my head. It hurts even after I complete the somersault and have my head out of
    >> water. I have to give about 20 to 30 seconds to allow the feeling to go away. It happens every
    >> time I do it.
    >
    >Exhale while turning. Getting into summersault, hold your breath for a moment, till you start going
    >up-side down (before the water starts going in) then start exhalig vigorously, through your nose.
    >No water can get in while the air is coming out. Once you're back to horizontal, proceed as usual.
    >
    >> I checked with other people (they aren't expert swimmer either). They say they don't get that
    >> feeling.
    >
    >Pool or ocean water inside your sinuses and on nasal membranes always hurts. The trick is to not
    >get the water in there.
    >
    I went to the pool and tried it out right away, it works partially. Much better than before. Maybe
    it takes more practice. Somehow the water still get in. I wonder if there's a device that can help
    pinch my nose while I'm doing
    it. I wish I can do a bunch of somesaults with the help of such a device.
     
  7. Dakitty

    Dakitty Guest

    "author" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > On Mon, 1 Sep 2003 13:50:53 -0700, "DaKitty" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >
    > >"author" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > >> I'm a newbie here. I'm not a regular swimmer either.
    > >>
    > >> 'shocked' isn't the right word. but I don't know a better word to describe the feeling.
    > >>
    > >> It happens when I do a somersault under water. My body goes head down, and somehow water gets
    > >> into the nostrils. That's when it happens. The impact centers at my nose and reaches my eyes
    > >> and the back of my head. It hurts even after I complete the somersault and have my head out of
    > >> water. I have to give about 20 to 30 seconds to allow the feeling to go away. It happens every
    > >> time I do it.
    > >
    > >Exhale while turning. Getting into summersault, hold your breath for a moment, till you start
    > >going up-side down (before the water starts going in) then start exhalig vigorously, through your
    > >nose. No water can get in while the air is
    coming
    > >out. Once you're back to horizontal, proceed as usual.
    > >
    > >> I checked with other people (they aren't expert swimmer either). They say they don't get that
    > >> feeling.
    > >
    > >Pool or ocean water inside your sinuses and on nasal membranes always
    hurts.
    > >The trick is to not get the water in there.
    > >
    > I went to the pool and tried it out right away, it works partially. Much better than before. Maybe
    > it takes more practice. Somehow the water still get in. I wonder if there's a device that can help
    > pinch my nose while I'm doing
    > it. I wish I can do a bunch of somesaults with the help of such a device.

    It takes practice. There are nose clips you can get, but then your nose is plugged the whole time.

    Just practice. It's like riding a bike, at some point you'll be able to do them a hundred times in a
    row without letting any water in.
     
  8. Shannon

    Shannon Guest

    A nose clip will definitely keep the water out, but I think it makes for less efficient breathing
    the rest of the time you're swimming. The clip will help you with the form of your flip turns, but
    eventually when you get rid of the nose clip you'll have to re-learn your breathing.

    I recommend just being tough, practice the flip turns while doing a strong exhale through the nose,
    and you'll get better in no time!

    -Shannon (who is still pretty weak on flip turns)
     
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