Not sure

Discussion in 'Recumbent bicycles' started by Aussie Steve, Feb 14, 2009.

  1. Aussie Steve

    Aussie Steve New Member

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    how you people do it, it looks mighty uncomfortable :eek: and on a normal double diamond frame, we get out of the saddle to go up hills, how do you ppl arc up the effort ? I dont understand how pedalling with legs out in front can be efficient ?:confused:
     
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  2. Ike90

    Ike90 New Member

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    It's interesting, the first time I rode a recumbent, I kept grabbing at my helmet because I thought it was blowing off of my head. I simply wasn't used to actually looking ahead of myself rather than staring down at the pavement. If you've ridden a diamond frame for years, you'll be shocked at how much of the world you don't see from that stooped-over position.

    There is no comparison between the comfort and natural posture of a recumbent and the palsied, bent-over, post-in-the-rear riding position of a "wedgie," and I've been riding wedgies for 40 years, and still love 'em.

    As far as climbing goes, it's all about gearing, and the "sit-and-spin" technique. While you don't have the leverage that standing on the pedals provides, you can avail yourself of the seat back to gain some push.
     
  3. Aussie Steve

    Aussie Steve New Member

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    stooped-over? I ride in the usual possie, and dont have a problem with vision, i'd reckon sitting back looking upwards would be more of an effort to get used to...on the DD i can turn my head easily to see important stuff like boxed bozos (cars)...I know you can fit mirrors to Rec's ( i got one on my DD)...
     
  4. Ike90

    Ike90 New Member

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    Well again, I'm not denigrating diamond frames at all, I'm simply saying that you can't appreciate the difference if you've never ridden a 'bent.
     
  5. blazingpedals

    blazingpedals New Member

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    DFs, (a.k.a. DDs) are optimized for climbing. OTOH, recumbents are better at downhills, flats, headwinds, tailwinds... in short, everywhere except climbing. I don't understand how pedaling with your legs perpendicular to the airflow can be efficient. And I can say that from the perspective of having experience on both platforms. So how do we do it? We work a little harder on uphills but we get to the top. Same as you suffering into a headwind.
     
  6. Spinninngrinnin

    Spinninngrinnin New Member

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    This is partly conjecture on my part as I have 1,000s more miles as a DF rider than Recumbent but I think its a physics deal. Your weight and the efforts from shoulders and arms plus your leg power gets the hill climbing done on a DF. On a Recumbent, its more just the legs...so more muscle development there will be needed...plus appropriately reconfigured gearing. At least on my Catrike 700 I don't need to worry about "tipping over" when it's me against gravity. - Terry
     
  7. "A"

    "A" New Member

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    I started road cycling since I was a teenager, I rode from the Pacific coast to Atlantic coast on DF road bikes, twice. I started riding recumbents because I was riding with my GF at a leisurly pace, no out of saddle climbing, just enjoy the ride. Recumbent allow riding without pain in the butt, back, neck, shoulders, wrists..

    If the rider's back is properly supported on a recumbent seat, the rider can generate more power than a rider out of saddle on a DF bicycle. It's a different kind of riding than DF bicycle.. Personally, I can ride farther with more comfort than DF bicycle... being fast on a bicycle is all in the rider's legs, given the same amount of proper training on a recumbent vs DF frame, more than likely, you could also be as fast if not faster.

    My guess is, responding to the title of this thread, if you want to be sure; spend a fair amount of time on a recumbent that is sized for you as you would a regular DF bicycle.
     
  8. Spinninngrinnin

    Spinninngrinnin New Member

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    "If the rider's back is properly supported on a recumbent seat, the rider can generate more power than a rider out of saddle on a DF bicycle. It's a different kind of riding than DF bicycle.."

    A-ha, I was thinking a bit like that posture allows more of the "leg press" situation as on a Universal gym. Sure, if the back and bottom are kept from being pushed upward, more of the strength moves the pedals.
     
  9. pcrx

    pcrx New Member

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    It all seems a bit odd until you ride one for a while. It all comes together when you ride a full century and realize that aside from your tired leg muscles - nothing else hurts!

    :)
     
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