novice to cycling

Discussion in 'Women's Cycling' started by jo280, Jan 22, 2013.

  1. jo280

    jo280 New Member

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    Hi I am just about to take up cycling, im in the process of buying a road bike. has any1 any advice on training plans i could start on
     
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  2. vspa

    vspa Active Member

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    we don't know your age and sporting background, but first things first: it is very important to buy the correct bike in terms of size and fit. The guys in the bike shop can help you out to acquire the best riding position. People tend to avoid too structured training when you start on the sport, instead it is recommended that you ride as often as you want or can. Eventually you will start building endurance and condition, so then you benefit from a proper base to begin with training plans. A training plan includes intensive riding, endurance riding and recovery days.
     
  3. burnrubber

    burnrubber New Member

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    good to hear you're taking up the cycling great way to keep fit,take it easy and build up gradually,good luck
     
  4. Georgia Darcy

    Georgia Darcy New Member

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    Hi, I've just started myself too. Yesterday bought the top of range Avanti in women's flat bar road bikes; Aria 3. Before this I have only ever had cheap bikes, mostly heavy mountain bikes. I am reasonably fit already but not experienced in doing any sort of distance on a bike. Today was my first ride with a local group. We did 50kms and it was my first go using cleated shoes. LOVED IT! The endorphines still have me high hours later. I am planning 2 rides a week with this group; around 50kms on Sundays and 30kms on Thursdays, with some other complimentary weight training at the gym twice a week and maybe another light ride alone around the Tuesday. I am 48 and had a total hip replacement last year and about 6kg over weight (not for long!). Good luck.
     
  5. Crumbs

    Crumbs New Member

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    Hi

    I'm in the same boat as you!! I've just bought my first road bike, having done a bit of riding on a hybrid previously.

    I'm not worried about increasing my speed, distance and fitness - that I can sort for myself... the bit that's worrying me slightly is what to do in terms of bike maintenance - I literally have no clue!

    Best of luck with your journey :)
     
  6. danfoz

    danfoz Well-Known Member

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    If the bike you just purchased is new, there may be some settle in period as cables stretch, etc for which a follow-up visit a couple weeks later to the bike shop may be needed (which should really be included in the purchase price). Some bikes run for quite a bit without needing any adjusting after the shop mechanic has put it togetherout of the box.

    Aside from knowing how to change a flat tire, the main pieces of maintenance 99% of riders should be concerned with are keeping the tires properly inflated and the chain lubricated: Tires can be filled many places. Correct pressure can affect the way a bike feels, how likely the tire is to get a flat, and affect general riding safety so it's helpful to keep it between the manufactures recommended psi either by using a pump with a gauge, or a small pressure checker (about $5-7) but the shop may charge a small fee to lube the chain. It's so cheap for a small bottle of lube (like Finish-line, or something similar) it's worth just picking up. Then every 2 or 3 weeks (or after just riding in the rain) apply some to the chain and wipe off the excess with a rag. If one doesn't ride that much, and not in the rain, and if the bike is kept in a dry place it can usually go a lot longer between lubes. Lot's of vids on YT to help.

    If you yourself are not mechanically inclined, a basic tune-up to the bike each year or two can really help increase it's life span.

    Another adjustment that happens more than many is adjusting the derailleurs if the gears start skipping. Again, EZ PZ on YT if you search for "rear derailleur indexing adjustment", and most times the only tools needed are thumb and forefinger. The front adjustment is a little more tricky and one which you may want help with at the bike shop while your feet are still wet.

    Feel free to ask as many questions on these forums as needed. There's usually no shortage of answers.
     
  7. vspa

    vspa Active Member

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    another one is to check that braking pads are not touching the rim, and of course that your wheel is true or "straight", back in the day i enjoyed as much riding as i did learning mechanics on the bike, nowadays i do basic maintenance but leave the bigger jobs to the guys in the bike shop,
     
  8. gklimber

    gklimber New Member

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    Hi. I am brand new to cycling. I'm 57, pretty athletic, and can picture myself really getting into this. So, I've been advised to go ahead and get a decent road bike. I've started looking, but this is overwhelming. Any pointers? I'm hoping to spend up to $1000? Is this reasonable? What should I be focusing on if I think I'm likely to ride quite a bit?
     
  9. vspa

    vspa Active Member

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    more important than your age is your height, so that people can give you advise on the frame size, even after you get the correct size you need to make several aditional adjustments to get the perfect fit. your budget is ok, for example you can get a Trek 1.2 http://www.trekbikes.com/us/en/bikes/road/sport/1_series/1_2/#/us/en/model/details?url=us/en/bikes/road/sport/1_series/1_2 im not endorsing them i just posted the link to give you some ideas, on mechanicals i really suggest that you learn how to fix a flat tire and to carry with you a small saddle bag with the necessary equipment to do that on the road because every now and then flats do happen, on apparel i would say you need a helmet even with you are not wearing cycling specific clothes or shoes,
     
  10. danfoz

    danfoz Well-Known Member

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    $1000 is a nice budget for a bike. It's certainly enough $$ for a bike that can take you well into a riding hobby and even one that could be eventually used competitively if your fancy is struck in that way.

    I'd recommend going to your local bike shop and maybe test riding a couple bikes in your budget. The bike in the link above is definitely one that would go on my personal shortlist, but mainly because it would fit my citeria. The key is getting a bike that fit's your criteria. Actually the key is getting a bike that fits properly and all else should flow from that.
     
  11. LiquidPrinter

    LiquidPrinter Banned

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    It is by riding a bicycle that you learn the contours of a country best, since you have to sweat up the hills and coast down them....
     
  12. vspa

    vspa Active Member

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    written by Ernest Hemingway or another famous writer,
     
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