NS numbers

Discussion in 'General Fitness' started by [email protected], Feb 28, 2006.

  1. Hi,

    New to this. Can anyone tell me what an NS number is and how I can
    translate it to a geographical reference? e.g., NS 374613

    TIA

    Chandy
     
    Tags:


  2. Peter Clinch

    Peter Clinch Guest

    [email protected] wrote:

    > New to this. Can anyone tell me what an NS number is and how I can
    > translate it to a geographical reference? e.g., NS 374613


    See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/British_national_grid_reference_system

    The "NS" is a 100 km square in the grid, within which you will have grid
    eastings and northings to give your grid reference.

    Pete.
    --
    Peter Clinch Medical Physics IT Officer
    Tel 44 1382 660111 ext. 33637 Univ. of Dundee, Ninewells Hospital
    Fax 44 1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK
    net [email protected] http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/
     
  3. In article <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] writes
    >Hi,
    >
    >New to this. Can anyone tell me what an NS number is and how I can
    >translate it to a geographical reference? e.g., NS 374613
    >


    NS is the identifier for the 100km square (round about the Glasgow
    area). The numbers are the grid ref in that square.

    As for conversion - what do you mean by 'geographical reference'? What
    are you hoping to do with the coordinates?

    Further reading should tell you all you need:

    http://www.ordnancesurvey.co.uk/oswebsite/gi/nationalgrid/nghelp1.html
    http://www.ordnancesurvey.co.uk/oswebsite/mapshop/
    http://www.gps.gov.uk/

    --

    Dominic Sexton
     
  4. Phil Cook

    Phil Cook Guest

    [email protected] wrote:

    >New to this. Can anyone tell me what an NS number is and how I can
    >translate it to a geographical reference? e.g., NS 374613


    That NS number is a grid reference. NS are the letters denoting the
    100km square. So NS 374613 is a stone near Clochodrick, Renfrewshire.

    If you change the letters you get different references, NT 37613 is
    close to Crichton Castle, Midlothian.

    See here for more on grid references.
    http://www.ordnancesurvey.co.uk/oswebsite/getamap/help.html#gridref
    --
    Phil Cook looking north over the park to the "Westminster Gasworks"
     
  5. Dominic Sexton <{d-sep03}@dscs.demon.co.uk> wrote:
    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > [email protected] writes
    >>
    >>New to this. Can anyone tell me what an NS number is and how I can
    >>translate it to a geographical reference? e.g., NS 374613
    >>

    > Further reading should tell you all you need:
    >
    > http://www.ordnancesurvey.co.uk/oswebsite/gi/nationalgrid/nghelp1.html
    > http://www.ordnancesurvey.co.uk/oswebsite/mapshop/
    > http://www.gps.gov.uk/
    >


    Or if you haven't got a suitable OS map and just want to know where
    that reference is, go to www.streetmap.co.uk and put NS374613 in the
    search box. No need to select from the options - just Search and a
    map will appear with that point marked. Zoom out or in until it
    shows at a useful scale.

    -adrian
     
  6. John Smith

    John Smith Guest

    "Peter Clinch" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > [email protected] wrote:
    >
    >> New to this. Can anyone tell me what an NS number is and how I can
    >> translate it to a geographical reference? e.g., NS 374613

    >
    > See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/British_national_grid_reference_system
    >
    > The "NS" is a 100 km square in the grid, within which you will have grid
    > eastings and northings to give your grid reference.


    Thats OK but what does NS mean? Or for that matter NT! There must be a way
    to translate these 100K Sq to an area surely;-)

    JS
     
  7. John Smith wrote:
    > Thats OK but what does NS mean? Or for that matter NT! There must be a way
    > to translate these 100K Sq to an area surely;-)


    Of themselves, they don't 'mean' anything - it's just a co-ordinate
    system. But, just for fun, let's assume an origin at the lower left of
    the SV square, such that we have X=0 and Y=0. We'll use Km for units.

    First, take the first letter. If it is J, O, or T, then add 500 to X.
    Now take the second letter. If it is B, G, M, R, or W then add a
    further 100 to X. Similarly, if it is C, H, N, S or X then add 200,
    and so on.

    Back to the first letter: if it is N or O then add 500 to Y. If it is
    H or J then add 1000 to Y.
    Second letter again: if it is Q, R, S, T, or U then add 100 to Y. If
    it is L, M, N, O or P then add 200 to Y, and so on.

    Now take the first three digits: they are the number of 10m blocks into
    the 100Km square, i.e. 1000ths of a square, so we can take the original
    374, divide it by 1000, and add it to X. Do the same with Y for the
    last three digits.

    That is the way to translate these to an area.

    A word of caution for anyone wanting to do this computationally -
    redefine your alphabet to not include the letter I, otherwise it'll all
    go wrong.

    Colin
     
  8. In article <[email protected]>, John Smith
    <[email protected]> writes
    >
    >"Peter Clinch" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:[email protected]
    >> [email protected] wrote:
    >>
    >>> New to this. Can anyone tell me what an NS number is and how I can
    >>> translate it to a geographical reference? e.g., NS 374613

    >>
    >> See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/British_national_grid_reference_system
    >>
    >> The "NS" is a 100 km square in the grid, within which you will have grid
    >> eastings and northings to give your grid reference.

    >
    >Thats OK but what does NS mean? Or for that matter NT! There must be a way
    >to translate these 100K Sq to an area surely;-)
    >
    >JS


    Here are the metre eastings and northings for the bottom left of each
    100km square.

    Sq Easting Northing
    HL 0 1200000
    HM 100000 1200000
    HN 200000 1200000
    HO 300000 1200000
    HP 400000 1200000
    HQ 0 1100000
    HR 100000 1100000
    HS 200000 1100000
    HT 300000 1100000
    HU 400000 1100000
    HV 0 1000000
    HW 100000 1000000
    HX 200000 1000000
    HY 300000 1000000
    HZ 400000 1000000
    NA 0 900000
    NB 100000 900000
    NC 200000 900000
    ND 300000 900000
    NE 400000 900000
    NF 0 800000
    NG 100000 800000
    NH 200000 800000
    NJ 300000 800000
    NK 400000 800000
    NL 0 700000
    NM 100000 700000
    NN 200000 700000
    NO 300000 700000
    NP 400000 700000
    NQ 0 600000
    NR 100000 600000
    NS 200000 600000
    NT 300000 600000
    NU 400000 600000
    NV 0 500000
    NW 100000 500000
    NX 200000 500000
    NY 300000 500000
    NZ 400000 500000
    OV 500000 500000
    SA 0 400000
    SB 100000 400000
    SC 200000 400000
    SD 300000 400000
    SE 400000 400000
    SF 0 300000
    SG 100000 300000
    SH 200000 300000
    SJ 300000 300000
    SK 400000 300000
    SL 0 200000
    SM 100000 200000
    SN 200000 200000
    SO 300000 200000
    SP 400000 200000
    SQ 0 100000
    SR 100000 100000
    SS 200000 100000
    ST 300000 100000
    SU 400000 100000
    SV 0 0
    SW 100000 0
    SX 200000 0
    SY 300000 0
    SZ 400000 0
    TA 500000 400000
    TF 500000 300000
    TG 600000 300000
    TL 500000 200000
    TM 600000 200000
    TQ 500000 100000
    TR 600000 100000
    TV 500000 0
    TW 600000 0

    --

    Dominic Sexton
     
  9. On Tue, 28 Feb 2006 15:33:09 -0000, "John Smith" <[email protected]> wrote:

    |
    |"Peter Clinch" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    |news:[email protected]
    |> [email protected] wrote:
    |>
    |>> New to this. Can anyone tell me what an NS number is and how I can
    |>> translate it to a geographical reference? e.g., NS 374613
    |>
    |> See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/British_national_grid_reference_system
    |>
    |> The "NS" is a 100 km square in the grid, within which you will have grid
    |> eastings and northings to give your grid reference.
    |
    |Thats OK but what does NS mean? Or for that matter NT! There must be a way
    |to translate these 100K Sq to an area surely;-)

    I does not *mean* anything it is just an identifier, Like counting
    see link:
    http://www.ordnancesurvey.co.uk/oswebsite/gi/nationalgrid/nghelp1.html
    --
    Dave Fawthrop <dave hyphenologist co uk>
    Freedom of Speech, Expression, Religion, and Democracy are
    the keys to Civilization, together with legal acceptance of
    Fundamental Human rights.
     
  10. Peter Clinch

    Peter Clinch Guest

    John Smith wrote:

    > Thats OK but what does NS mean? Or for that matter NT! There must be a way
    > to translate these 100K Sq to an area surely;-)


    The first letter (S, T, N, H or O) characterises a 500 km square, S is
    the most South Westerly and has its SW point at the grid origin. The
    second letter is one of 25 (I is not used) 100 km sub-squares within it:

    ABCDE
    FGHJK
    LMNOP
    QRSTU
    VWXYZ

    Many of these 100 km squares cover areas outwith the coastline so you'll
    never see them on maps.

    The overall distribution of the 500 Km squares is

    H
    NO
    ST

    So NS means go up 500 km from the origin to get to N, then another 100
    km up to get to the relevant row of 100 km squares, and 200km to the
    right to get to the right column of 100 km squares.

    Within the 100 km square, a grid reference will give offsets from the
    square's origin. A 10 figure reference (5 each for Eastings and
    Northings, as a GPS gives) will give you number of meters along each
    axis of the 100 kn square.

    Pete.
    --
    Peter Clinch Medical Physics IT Officer
    Tel 44 1382 660111 ext. 33637 Univ. of Dundee, Ninewells Hospital
    Fax 44 1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK
    net [email protected] http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/
     
  11. John Smith

    John Smith Guest

    "Dominic Sexton" <{d-sep03}@dscs.demon.co.uk> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > In article <[email protected]>, John Smith
    > <[email protected]> writes
    >>
    >>"Peter Clinch" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >>news:[email protected]
    >>> [email protected] wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> New to this. Can anyone tell me what an NS number is and how I can
    >>>> translate it to a geographical reference? e.g., NS 374613
    >>>
    >>> See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/British_national_grid_reference_system
    >>>
    >>> The "NS" is a 100 km square in the grid, within which you will have grid
    >>> eastings and northings to give your grid reference.

    >>
    >>Thats OK but what does NS mean? Or for that matter NT! There must be a way
    >>to translate these 100K Sq to an area surely;-)
    >>
    >>JS

    >
    > Here are the metre eastings and northings for the bottom left of each
    > 100km square.
    >
    > Sq Easting Northing
    > HL 0 1200000
    > HM 100000 1200000
    > HN 200000 1200000
    > HO 300000 1200000
    > HP 400000 1200000
    > HQ 0 1100000
    > HR 100000 1100000
    > HS 200000 1100000
    > HT 300000 1100000
    > HU 400000 1100000
    > HV 0 1000000
    > HW 100000 1000000
    > HX 200000 1000000
    > HY 300000 1000000
    > HZ 400000 1000000
    > NA 0 900000
    > NB 100000 900000
    > NC 200000 900000
    > ND 300000 900000
    > NE 400000 900000
    > NF 0 800000
    > NG 100000 800000
    > NH 200000 800000
    > NJ 300000 800000
    > NK 400000 800000
    > NL 0 700000
    > NM 100000 700000
    > NN 200000 700000
    > NO 300000 700000
    > NP 400000 700000
    > NQ 0 600000
    > NR 100000 600000
    > NS 200000 600000
    > NT 300000 600000
    > NU 400000 600000
    > NV 0 500000
    > NW 100000 500000
    > NX 200000 500000
    > NY 300000 500000
    > NZ 400000 500000
    > OV 500000 500000
    > SA 0 400000
    > SB 100000 400000
    > SC 200000 400000
    > SD 300000 400000
    > SE 400000 400000
    > SF 0 300000
    > SG 100000 300000
    > SH 200000 300000
    > SJ 300000 300000
    > SK 400000 300000
    > SL 0 200000
    > SM 100000 200000
    > SN 200000 200000
    > SO 300000 200000
    > SP 400000 200000
    > SQ 0 100000
    > SR 100000 100000
    > SS 200000 100000
    > ST 300000 100000
    > SU 400000 100000
    > SV 0 0
    > SW 100000 0
    > SX 200000 0
    > SY 300000 0
    > SZ 400000 0
    > TA 500000 400000
    > TF 500000 300000
    > TG 600000 300000
    > TL 500000 200000
    > TM 600000 200000
    > TQ 500000 100000
    > TR 600000 100000
    > TV 500000 0
    > TW 600000 0


    Hurrah ;-) Looks correct ;-)
     
  12. I want to convert it to co-ordinates to put into google maps to -see-
    where it is as I live not far away :)

    Thanks for all the replies, I think I can find my way now :)

    Chandy
     
  13. Roger

    Roger Guest

    The message <[email protected]>
    from "John Smith" <[email protected]> contains these words:

    > > The "NS" is a 100 km square in the grid, within which you will have grid
    > > eastings and northings to give your grid reference.


    > Thats OK but what does NS mean? Or for that matter NT! There must be a way
    > to translate these 100K Sq to an area surely;-)


    There is some method in the madness but not as much as there was
    originally when the National Grid was the sole preserve of the War
    Office.

    Take a 25000 km square. Subdivide it into 25 500 km squares and label
    them consecutively from A to Z excluding I. Then subdivide each 500 km
    square in the same manner. Within the 25000 km square each 100 km square
    now has a unique 2 letter label.

    The War Office put the false origin of their National Grid at the SW
    corner of their 25000 km square. ie at the SW corner of the square VV.
    When the OS extended the system to civilian maps they moved the true
    origin of the grid a short distance and shifted the false origin much
    further, to the SW corner of square SV. That change could of course have
    been done out of bloody mindedness but it did mean that all of the
    Northern half of mainland Britain (and the Western Isles) now fell in
    square N and most of Southern Britain fell into square S. Almost all the
    Northern Isles are orphaned in square H and the more Easterly part of
    England in square T. I don't think St Kilda figured in either scheme.

    Ireland had its own grid in the War Office scheme within one 500 km
    square conveniently labelled with the missing I. Ireland still has a
    grid of course but they have dropped the I so each 100 km square is
    designated by a single letter. I don't know where the origins are but
    there seems to have been little if any change in the position of the
    Irish squares.

    --
    Roger Chapman
     
  14. Andy Champ

    Andy Champ Guest

    Adrian Godwin wrote:
    > Dominic Sexton <{d-sep03}@dscs.demon.co.uk> wrote:
    >
    >>In article <[email protected]>,
    >>[email protected] writes
    >>
    >>>New to this. Can anyone tell me what an NS number is and how I can
    >>>translate it to a geographical reference? e.g., NS 374613
    >>>

    >>
    >>Further reading should tell you all you need:
    >>
    >>http://www.ordnancesurvey.co.uk/oswebsite/gi/nationalgrid/nghelp1.html
    >>http://www.ordnancesurvey.co.uk/oswebsite/mapshop/
    >>http://www.gps.gov.uk/
    >>

    >
    >
    > Or if you haven't got a suitable OS map and just want to know where
    > that reference is, go to www.streetmap.co.uk and put NS374613 in the
    > search box. No need to select from the options - just Search and a
    > map will appear with that point marked. Zoom out or in until it
    > shows at a useful scale.
    >
    > -adrian



    .... or multimap.

    http://multimap.com/map/browse.cgi?lat=55.8175&lon=-4.5967&scale=25000&icon=x

    BTW streetmap's arrow doesn't touch the target, you have to lok a little
    SW of the tip.

    Andy
     
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