Numb feet from elliptical trainer

Discussion in 'General Fitness' started by Mseagan, Jan 24, 2004.

  1. Mseagan

    Mseagan Guest

    Because of back problems I have had to replace half of my running with the elliptical trainer. If I
    am on it for longer than 35 minutes, my feet start to feel numb. Does anyone have any suggestions
    for how to avoid this? Is there a recommended shoe specifically for this kind of motion?

    Thanks. Marianne
     
    Tags:


  2. In article <[email protected]_s54>, MSEagan wrote:
    > Because of back problems I have had to replace half of my running with the elliptical
    > trainer. If I am on it for longer than 35 minutes, my feet start to feel numb. Does anyone
    > have any suggestions for how to avoid this? Is there a recommended shoe specifically for this
    > kind of motion?

    I had similar problems, my feet got a little sore. To some extent, I adapted over time. Either way,
    on exercises like this, one can always take a short interim break.

    Cheers,
    --
    Donovan Rebbechi http://pegasus.rutgers.edu/~elflord/
     
  3. On Sat, 24 Jan 2004 23:32:39 +0000 (UTC), Donovan Rebbechi
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >In article <[email protected]_s54>, MSEagan wrote:
    >> Because of back problems I have had to replace half of my running with the elliptical trainer. If
    >> I am on it for longer than 35 minutes, my feet start to feel numb. Does anyone have any
    >> suggestions for how to avoid this? Is there a recommended shoe specifically for this kind of
    >> motion?
    >
    >I had similar problems, my feet got a little sore. To some extent, I adapted over time. Either way,
    >on exercises like this, one can always take a short interim break.
    you might try a few different stances. I start with my feet at the back of the pedals, and half way
    thru the workout, i move them to the front. you might loosen your shoes. push thru your heels, not
    your toes. ...thehick
     
  4. David

    David Guest

    "frank-in-toronto" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > On Sat, 24 Jan 2004 23:32:39 +0000 (UTC), Donovan Rebbechi <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >In article <[email protected]_s54>, MSEagan wrote:
    > >> Because of back problems I have had to replace half of my running with
    the
    > >> elliptical trainer. If I am on it for longer than 35 minutes, my feet
    start
    > >> to feel numb. Does anyone have any suggestions for how to avoid this?
    Is
    > >> there a recommended shoe specifically for this kind of motion?
    > >
    > >I had similar problems, my feet got a little sore. To some extent, I
    adapted
    > >over time. Either way, on exercises like this, one can always take a
    short
    > >interim break.
    > you might try a few different stances. I start with my feet at the back of the pedals, and half
    > way thru the workout, i move them to the front. you might loosen your shoes. push thru your heels,
    > not your toes. ...thehick

    just out of interest, are you using a heart rate monitor when on the elliptical? - just curious to
    see how ellipticals give you an efficient cardio workout.
     
  5. On Sun, 25 Jan 2004 01:55:16 GMT, "David" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    <original question snipped>
    >> you might try a few different stances. I start with my feet at the back of the pedals, and half
    >> way thru the workout, i move them to the front. you might loosen your shoes. push thru your
    >> heels, not your toes. ...thehick
    >
    >just out of interest, are you using a heart rate monitor when on the elliptical? - just curious to
    >see how ellipticals give you an efficient cardio workout.
    >
    i sometimes do. sometimes i don't. depending on whether i'm doing an easy day or a hard day, i
    might need info. if i'm doing intervals, i want my heart rate to peak and then come down during my
    recovery time. so, i might wear my HRM then. but really, after a while, you get to know what heart
    rate you're at. you learn your body. so, yes, i suggest wearing the HRM quite a few times. until
    you learn what happens inside given certain stresses. then you won't need it so much. however, if
    you want to be one of those that select the "cardio" or "fat burn" programs, you may have to wear
    it so the machine can adjust to you. i don't do those and really have little interest in them right
    now. i only use the elliptical for cross-training. since i still can run, i am. as for the question
    of "does it give a good cardio workout"? well, everything is specific to what you are doing.
    working out on the elliptical will let you get pretty good...at working out on the elliptical. it
    won't do much for running. or digging ditches. or shovelling snow. you need to pick a goal. and
    work towards it.

    ...thehick
     
  6. David

    David Guest

    "frank-in-toronto" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > On Sun, 25 Jan 2004 01:55:16 GMT, "David" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > <original question snipped>
    > >> you might try a few different stances. I start with my feet at the back of the pedals, and half
    > >> way thru the workout, i move them to the front. you might loosen your shoes. push thru your
    > >> heels, not your toes. ...thehick
    > >
    > >just out of interest, are you using a heart rate monitor when on the elliptical? - just curious
    > >to see how ellipticals give you an efficient cardio workout.
    > >
    > i sometimes do. sometimes i don't. depending on whether i'm doing an easy day or a hard day, i
    > might need info. if i'm doing intervals, i want my heart rate to peak and then come down during my
    > recovery time. so, i might wear my HRM then. but really, after a while, you get to know what heart
    > rate you're at. you learn your body. so, yes, i suggest wearing the HRM quite a few times. until
    > you learn what happens inside given certain stresses. then you won't need it so much. however, if
    > you want to be one of those that select the "cardio" or "fat burn" programs, you may have to wear
    > it so the machine can adjust to you. i don't do those and really have little interest in them
    > right now. i only use the elliptical for cross-training. since i still can run, i am. as for the
    > question of "does it give a good cardio workout"? well, everything is specific to what you are
    > doing. working out on the elliptical will let you get pretty good...at working out on the
    > elliptical. it won't do much for running. or digging ditches. or shovelling snow. you need to pick
    > a goal. and work towards it.
    >
    > ...thehick

    thanks - I had used an elliptical recently and found it difficult to get my heart rate up when
    compared say to a treadmill and just wondering about others experience - there is something about
    the way the legs work and that there is no impact that doesn't seem to give much of a pump - and
    there is too much strain on the hip flexors when working hard enough to get your heart rate elevated
    to somewhere around my target range.

    David
     
  7. Ken A Whore

    Ken A Whore Guest

    Don't take advice from this dummy unless it's about dainty treadmill jogging.

    Donovan Rebbechi <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<
     
  8. On Sun, 25 Jan 2004 02:21:02 GMT, "David" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    <old stuff snipped>
    >
    >thanks - I had used an elliptical recently and found it difficult to get my heart rate up when
    >compared say to a treadmill and just wondering about others experience - there is something about
    >the way the legs work and that there is no impact that doesn't seem to give much of a pump - and
    >there is too much strain on the hip flexors when working hard enough to get your heart rate
    >elevated to somewhere around my target range.
    I don't see hardly any hip flexor action. you don't pull your legs forward. the leading leg
    pushes down. the lower you squat, the more the hams and glutes get into it. i use the life
    fitness elliptical where the arms are involved also. recently, a basically newbie worked out with
    me and the only muscles that hurt the next day were in her back. impact doesn't raise your heart
    rate. perhaps you're not trying hard enough on the elliptical, or perhaps, again, you're trying
    to get your heart rate too high. IIRC you said you couldn't run so much because of bad knees...
    well then, you better figure out the elliptical. or the rower. bikes would be my last choice for
    a cardio workout unless i was interested in becoming a better biker on the street. ...thehick
     
  9. Mseagan

    Mseagan Guest

    No, I do not use a heart rate monitor but I push as hard as I really feel I can when I am on it. I
    watch the METS which change depending on how hard I push and I know my range...anything above 7.0 is
    good. I sweat like crazy and my body fat is already so low that losing weight is not a goal. I swim
    many miles each week (i.e. not monitor) so I have learned to judge what "hard" is for me. When I
    first used the trainer and put my hands on the moving bars, my arms would actually ache if I tried
    running a few days later...as though they were out of shape. I never realized how important the arm
    swinging motion of free running was. So now, I do not hold onto the bars; I swing my arms free as I
    use the trainer (it took some practice to balance well enough to do this while moving hard ---now
    second nature to me).

    "David" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]
    server.bigpond.net.au...
    >
    > "frank-in-toronto" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > On Sat, 24 Jan 2004 23:32:39 +0000 (UTC), Donovan Rebbechi <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > > >In article <[email protected]_s54>, MSEagan wrote:
    > > >> Because of back problems I have had to replace half of my running
    with
    > the
    > > >> elliptical trainer. If I am on it for longer than 35 minutes, my feet
    > start
    > > >> to feel numb. Does anyone have any suggestions for how to avoid this?
    > Is
    > > >> there a recommended shoe specifically for this kind of motion?
    > > >
    > > >I had similar problems, my feet got a little sore. To some extent, I
    > adapted
    > > >over time. Either way, on exercises like this, one can always take a
    > short
    > > >interim break.
    > > you might try a few different stances. I start with my feet at the back of the pedals, and half
    > > way thru the workout, i move them to the front. you might loosen your shoes. push thru your
    > > heels, not your toes. ...thehick
    >
    > just out of interest, are you using a heart rate monitor when on the elliptical? - just curious to
    > see how ellipticals give you an efficient cardio workout.
     
  10. Wholovesya?

    Wholovesya? Guest

    [email protected] (Ken a whore) wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>... WHO WAS IT, THREATENED THE PRESIDENT?

    WHO ADVOCATED AID TO TERRORISTS?

    YEP, our own BILL DAVIDSON, just one day after the 9-11 attack, while the victims were
    still burning.
    ___________________________________________________
    "we should bomb that pathetic excuse for a man too, or at least give his location to every terrorist
    group we can find, and let them take him out. Just what we need in the white house, a coked-up
    dopehead running the country".

    From: MrRobotTow ([email protected]) Subject: Re: The Only Thing Newsgroups:
    rec.music.makers.bagpipe Date: 2001-09-12 03:00:32 PST

    http://groups.google.com/groups?q=pathetic+pea-brain+mrrobottow&hl=en&lr=&ie=UTF-
    8&selm=20010912055959.21715.00001917%40mb-fi.aol.com&rnum=3
    ___________________________________________________

    YO! Homeland Security dudes: KEY PHRASES! BOMB "WHITE HOUSE" "TERRORIST GROUP"

    THERE'S YER ANTISOCIAL NUT CASE, RIGHT THERE! COULD BE another John Hinckley. Check him out!

    This US citizen publicly called for AID to TERRORISTS: IS HIS NAME ON YOUR LIST? Check him out!

    To long-suffering RMMB contributors: DO COPY AND PASTE this message. THEN use it to REPLY anytime
    you have an urge to respond to the NOT-REALLY-ANNONYMOUS troll on RMMB and rec.running. (Why, YES,
    Bill Davidson, the source of thousands of lowlife postings under dozens of account names, is also
    "TheBillRodgers" and his clones.

    Will Bill's own words amuse him as much as they amuse us? WILL THEY AMUSE OTHERS? Let's find out.
    Let's be sure BILL gets the attention he deserves and craves.

    COPY, PASTE, REPLY to our TROLL. IT'S THAT EASY
     
  11. David

    David Guest

    "MSEagan" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]_s53...
    > No, I do not use a heart rate monitor but I push as hard as I really feel
    I
    > can when I am on it. I watch the METS which change depending on how hard I push and I know my
    > range...anything above 7.0 is good. I sweat like crazy and my body fat is already so low that
    > losing weight is not a goal. I swim many miles each week (i.e. not monitor) so I have learned to
    > judge what "hard" is for me. When I first used the trainer and put my hands on the moving bars, my
    > arms would actually ache if I tried running a few days later...as though they were out of shape. I
    > never realized how important the arm swinging motion
    of
    > free running was. So now, I do not hold onto the bars; I swing my arms
    free
    > as I use the trainer (it took some practice to balance well enough to do this while moving hard
    > ---now second nature to me).
    >
    thanks, I take your point as you know your body and if you are getting a good cardio workout you
    don;t need a monitor - for some reason I had a problem gettting to that stage on an elliptical when
    your heart/lungs are really going. And yes arm movement is so important -

    >
    > "David" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]
    > server.bigpond.net.au...
    > >
    > > "frank-in-toronto" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > news:[email protected]...
    > > > On Sat, 24 Jan 2004 23:32:39 +0000 (UTC), Donovan Rebbechi <[email protected]> wrote:
    > > >
    > > > >In article <[email protected]_s54>, MSEagan wrote:
    > > > >> Because of back problems I have had to replace half of my running
    > with
    > > the
    > > > >> elliptical trainer. If I am on it for longer than 35 minutes, my
    feet
    > > start
    > > > >> to feel numb. Does anyone have any suggestions for how to avoid
    this?
    > > Is
    > > > >> there a recommended shoe specifically for this kind of motion?
    > > > >
    > > > >I had similar problems, my feet got a little sore. To some extent, I
    > > adapted
    > > > >over time. Either way, on exercises like this, one can always take a
    > > short
    > > > >interim break.
    > > > you might try a few different stances. I start with my feet at the back of the pedals, and
    > > > half way thru the workout, i move them to the front. you might loosen your shoes. push thru
    > > > your heels, not your toes. ...thehick
    > >
    > > just out of interest, are you using a heart rate monitor when on the elliptical? - just curious
    > > to see how ellipticals give you an efficient cardio workout.
    > >
    >
     
  12. David

    David Guest

    "frank-in-toronto" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > On Sun, 25 Jan 2004 02:21:02 GMT, "David" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > <old stuff snipped>
    > >
    > >thanks - I had used an elliptical recently and found it difficult to get
    my
    > >heart rate up when compared say to a treadmill and just wondering about others experience - there
    > >is something about the way the legs work and
    that
    > >there is no impact that doesn't seem to give much of a pump - and there
    is
    > >too much strain on the hip flexors when working hard enough to get your heart rate elevated to
    > >somewhere around my target range.
    > I don't see hardly any hip flexor action. you don't pull your legs forward. the leading leg
    > pushes down. the lower you squat, the more the hams and glutes get into it. i use the life
    > fitness elliptical where the arms are involved also. recently, a basically newbie worked out
    > with me and the only muscles that hurt the next day were in her back. impact doesn't raise your
    > heart rate. perhaps you're not trying hard enough on the elliptical, or perhaps, again, you're
    > trying to get your heart rate too high. IIRC you said you couldn't run so much because of bad
    > knees... well then, you better figure out the elliptical. or the rower. bikes would be my last
    > choice for a cardio workout unless i was interested in becoming a better biker on the street.
    > ...thehick

    thanks, I take your points - so hard to find the right thing to get your heart going and yet not to
    get injuries - I will keep at it - yes I guess the back could be an issue if you are twisting your
    upper body with the arm movements - I was told to do more stretching to try to avoid injuries -
    thanks for the tips about using the ellipticals
     
  13. Profwdesk1

    Profwdesk1 Guest

    loosen your laces
     
  14. Ken A Whore

    Ken A Whore Guest

    "MSEagan" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]_s53>...
    > No, I do not use a heart rate monitor but I push as hard as I really feel I can when I am on it. I
    > watch the METS which change depending on how hard I push and I know my range...anything above 7.0
    > is good. I sweat like crazy and my body fat is already so low that losing weight is not a goal. I
    > swim many miles each week (i.e. not monitor) so I have learned to judge what "hard" is for me.
    > When I first used the trainer and put my hands on the moving bars, my arms would actually ache if
    > I tried running a few days later...as though they were out of shape. I never realized how
    > important the arm swinging motion of free running was. So now, I do not hold onto the bars; I
    > swing my arms free as I use the trainer (it took some practice to balance well enough to do this
    > while moving hard ---now second nature to me).

    Swinging the arms freely is a trick I had reserved for "pros" like myself, but since you spilled the
    beans to the whole NG, I will admit it and endorse it. TheBillRodgers has spoken.
     
  15. Ken A Whore

    Ken A Whore Guest

    Send me an avi of you on it in the nude, so i can judge your form. Then we'll talk, and talk,
    and talk...

    "MSEagan" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]_s54>...
    > Because of back problems I have had to replace half of my running with the elliptical
    > trainer. If I am on it for longer than 35 minutes, my feet start to feel numb. Does anyone
    > have any suggestions for how to avoid this? Is there a recommended shoe specifically for this
    > kind of motion?
    >
    > Thanks. Marianne
     
  16. Wholovesya?

    Wholovesya? Guest

    WHO WAS IT, THREATENED THE PRESIDENT?

    WHO ADVOCATED AID TO TERRORISTS?

    YEP, our own BILL DAVIDSON, just one day after the 9-11 attack, while the victims were
    still burning.
    ___________________________________________________
    "we should bomb that pathetic excuse for a man too, or at least give his location to every terrorist
    group we can find, and let them take him out. Just what we need in the white house, a coked-up
    dopehead running the country".

    From: MrRobotTow ([email protected]) Subject: Re: The Only Thing Newsgroups:
    rec.music.makers.bagpipe Date: 2001-09-12 03:00:32 PST

    http://groups.google.com/groups?q=pathetic+pea-brain+mrrobottow&hl=en&lr=&ie=UTF-
    8&selm=20010912055959.21715.00001917%40mb-fi.aol.com&rnum=3
    ___________________________________________________

    YO! Homeland Security dudes: KEY PHRASES! BOMB "WHITE HOUSE" "TERRORIST GROUP"

    THERE'S YER ANTISOCIAL NUT CASE, RIGHT THERE! COULD BE another John Hinckley. Check him out!

    This US citizen publicly called for AID to TERRORISTS: IS HIS NAME ON YOUR LIST? Check him out!

    To long-suffering RMMB contributors: DO COPY AND PASTE this message. THEN use it to REPLY anytime
    you have an urge to respond to the NOT-REALLY-ANNONYMOUS troll on RMMB and rec.running. (Why, YES,
    Bill Davidson, the source of thousands of lowlife postings under dozens of account names, is also
    "TheBillRodgers" and his clones.

    Will Bill's own words amuse him as much as they amuse us? WILL THEY AMUSE OTHERS? Let's find out.
    Let's be sure BILL gets the attention he deserves and craves.

    COPY, PASTE, REPLY to our TROLL. IT'S THAT EASY
     
  17. Johnny Bravo

    Johnny Bravo Guest

    On Sun, 25 Jan 2004 01:55:16 GMT, "David" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >just out of interest, are you using a heart rate monitor when on the elliptical? - just curious to
    >see how ellipticals give you an efficient cardio workout.

    Not to hard to get your heart rate up if you push it, but like running I'm sure it will take time
    to build up to that level where you can maintain it for long. I can easily get my heart rate up
    into the 90% range and hold it there during a run, but on an eliptical (which I only tried once) I
    could get my heart rate up to the same level but had to stop after a short time as my muscles were
    getting too tired.

    The best way I can describe the feeling was that I was trying to jog on a stairclimber. :)

    --
    "The most merciful thing in the world, I think, is the inability of the human mind to correlate all
    its contents." - H.P. Lovecraft
     
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