Numbness on hands & Presta vs Schrader

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by lol168, Feb 9, 2013.

  1. lol168

    lol168 New Member

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    Hi all, I'm a totally novice and brand new to this forum. This forum is very informative and just making me more interested to learn!

    I'm 5'1 riding Trek WSD 7.2FX. Recently went to dealer and asked for help, did seat adjustment, and replace bar grip to the ergonomic ones. Numbness improved a lot but still exists after approx 5 miles drive:

    So, here's my question:
    1) What can I do to reduce hands numbness? By adding Aero bars so my hands can have different position when ride longer?
    2) Is Presta valves better than Schrader valves on a 700c 25mm tires?

    Thanks in advance!
     
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  2. Volnix

    Volnix Well-Known Member

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    1. Get some gloves, if the new handles didnt help. You could also remove your hands from the handlebar every while to allow circulation. I suppose its not a cold related numbness right?

    2. Either is fine, I have some presta valves which I have a bad time inflating without the pump loosing pressure so I dont know how much I am inflating and have to fiddle with the pump-valve connection alot. Maybe the Shraeder design has a better contact with the pump so it doesnt loose inflation. The screw bit on the presta's seems a bit flimsy too. Last tube I had somehow got detached from the tube. You might want to be careful when initially installing and also be careful not to stress the tube by pulling the valve too much around. It depends on what fits in your rims too. I havent seen many 700*25 tires with Schraeder valve rims.

    Good thing about Shraeder is that you can inflate your tires an any gas station.
     
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  3. tonyzackery

    tonyzackery Well-Known Member

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    Hand numbness? Too much pressure concentrated in too small an area. Suggest you have your bars raised with some spacers under your stem, our perhaps a 'riser' stem. This will in effect move weight off your hands and rearward onto your other contact points (i.e. your bum and feet). A shorter stem will also accomplish the same effect.

    700x25 tires and Presta or Schrader valves? Presta valve tubes will be lighter, that's about the only advantage to Presta I can see. Even if you're a racer, that "advantage" is negligible. You can always get a Presta to Schrader valve adapter that will allow better purchase on the valve by the pump head. Makes air filling much easier on a Presta valved tube.
     
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  4. lol168

    lol168 New Member

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    @Volnix: Thanks for the advice! I will try to move my hands around more...... "Cold-related numbness"? Good question,...... Never thought about that. Will wearing hand warmer helps if it's cold related?
     
  5. lol168

    lol168 New Member

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    @tonyzackery: Thanks! But I just want to clarify one thing: So I should try to adjust the stem height by "either" raising or lowering it, correct?
     
  6. tonyzackery

    tonyzackery Well-Known Member

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    Actually, you're desiring to move more of your weight to the rear - off of your hands. It's that extra pressure on your hands that's causing them to go numb, IMO. You'll want to raise your handlebar height or shorten your reach to the bars. This is done by either raising the stem with spacers, obtaining a higher rise stem (possibly flipping your existing stem over so that it extends upward), or getting a shorter stem. Employing any of these (you could also lower your saddle, but that's another issue altogether) will move your center of gravity more towards the rear of the bike, which will alleviate the pressure on your hands.
     
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  7. lol168

    lol168 New Member

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    Thanks for clarifying!
     
  8. lol168

    lol168 New Member

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    Quote: Orginally Posted by tonyzackery .

    Actually, you're desiring to move more of your weight to the rear - off of your hands. It's that extra pressure on your hands that's causing them to go numb, IMO. You'll want to raise your handlebar height or shorten your reach to the bars. This is done by either raising the stem with spacers, obtaining a higher rise stem (possibly flipping your existing stem over so that it extends upward), or getting a shorter stem. Employing any of these (you could also lower your saddle, but that's another issue altogether) will move your center of gravity more towards the rear of the bike, which will alleviate the pressure on your hands.

    Thank you/img/vbsmilies/smilies/smile.gif
     
  9. Volnix

    Volnix Well-Known Member

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    Cold can caus hand numbness. You could use some windproof gloves with some thermal insulation. Like softshell fleece ones.
     
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  10. lol168

    lol168 New Member

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  11. lol168

    lol168 New Member

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    Thanks again. Will definitely try!
     
  12. oldbobcat

    oldbobcat Well-Known Member

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    Getting weight off the hands is the most important way to eliminate hand numbness. Raising the handlebar is one way to do this. Another way, that doesn't cost anything, is to move the saddle rearwards, and lower it a bit. Well, then if it still isn't enough, or you find yourself reaching too far, look into a riser stem or a shorter one.
     
  13. alfeng

    alfeng Well-Known Member

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    FWIW. I think that you may want to consider as your long term option changing the handlebars from the FLAT bars to a set of MOUSTACHE handlebars ...

    • FLAT bars afford very little variation in hand positions
    • Bar Ends may be beneficial to your current handlebars

    • Moustache handlebars are DROP handlebars without the drop ...

    DROP handlebars which are typical on ROAD bikes would probably be best, but the would not allow you to use your current shifters & brake calipers.
     
  14. lol168

    lol168 New Member

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    Moustache handlebars?... Interesting! Never heard of till now...... I will check it out. Thanks for sharing/advice!!
     
  15. lol168

    lol168 New Member

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    [​IMG] [​IMG] Thanks for all the advices! This is just a follow up of what I've done after taken in the advises: 1) Add the bar end 2) Replace the stem 3) Move the saddle forward (by approximate 1cm) I see a great improvement on my hands numbness issue. Now the only thing is when I try to ride faster, I started understand the "aerodynamic issue". Well, I guess you can't have it all (lol).... and it validate my strong desire to get a new road bike!?
     
  16. Volnix

    Volnix Well-Known Member

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    Aerodynamics also help in getting caught in fast wind... But the aerodynamic position is not comfortable at all... A road bike its also good for climbs. /img/vbsmilies/smilies/smile.gif
     
  17. alfeng

    alfeng Well-Known Member

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    I presume that by the "aerodynamic position" you are referring to riding with your hands on the handlebar's DROPS ...

    If THAT is the case, then while comfort is certainly subjective ...

    Presuming you have not suffered an injury (e.g., whiplash/etc.) and/or you do not have a back problem then riding with your hands on the handlebar's DROPS should NOT be uncomfortable ...

    IMO, if you are uncomfortable with your hands on the drops then you EITHER need to get MORE flexible ...

    • of course, SRAM shifters will probably make riding on any bike less comfortable
    • only half-kidding, BTW!!.

    OR, change to different handlebars which have may have a different width, reach, curvature, whatever ... and/or, a different stem length.
     
  18. alienator

    alienator Well-Known Member

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    Perhaps you should revisit the fit on your road bike if you're so uncomfortable.
     
  19. alfeng

    alfeng Well-Known Member

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    FYI. If the idea of MOUSTACHE handlebars doesn't work for you, then you can certainly put DROP handlebars + ROAD shifters on ANY bike for less than the cost of a new bike ...

    • and, if a 48t chainring doesn't provide tall enough gearing, you can always change the crankset to a Road crankset

    Here are three of my bikes (as pictured, they are in different states of assembly) which typically would not have Drop handlebars + Road shifters ...

    The first is a HYBRID frame with a Cyclocross fork ...
    [​IMG]
    The second is a MTB frame which would normally use 26" wheels but which I configured to use 700c wheels ... a Carbon Fiber Road fork + Road brake calipers were installed ...
    [​IMG]
    And, the third is a MTB frame with Drop bars + Road crankset ... while the bike current has cantilever brake calipers, I may change them to "mini" V-brake calipers -- "mini" V-brakes are compatible with Road brake levers ....
    [​IMG]

    Despite the Campagnolo shifters, all three bikes have Shimano derailleurs.

    FYI. 10-speed Campagnolo are compatible with both 8-and-9-speed Shimano drivetrains -- a direct swap to achieve 8-speed indexing, and a minor tweak in the rear derailleur cable attachment to achieve 9-speed indexing ...

    So, you would only need to choose the handlebar shape that suits your preference + a set of 10-speed Campagnolo shifters + handlebar tape & cables/housing + "mini" V-brake calipers.

    • Cost should be under $200 if you buy the components via eBay + DIY
    • other than deciding which handlebars to buy (width & shape) & waiting for them to arrive in the mail, wrapping the handlebars will take the most time & possibly the most effort!

    1. you only have to detach the cables from their respective derailleurs & brakes
    2. remove the current handlebars
    3. install the new handlebars and/or stem (change the stem LATER if the reach is too long)
    4. install the brake levers (a 5mm Allen wrench with a LONG shaft is required for most shifters, otherwise an annoying TORX [25] wrench) & cables/housing
    5. attach the cables to their respective derailleurs & brake calipers
    6. after you locate the levers where you want them then tape the cable housing against the handlebars with tape -- I don't know why people recommend electrical tape unless those people re-wrap their handlebars every month because the adhesive used on most electrical tape becomes a gooey mess over time ... personally, I recommend either masking tape, packing tape ... anything but cellophane tape.
    7. adjust cable tension
    8. test
    9. adjust cable tension
    10. wrap handlebars
    11. done!

    If the stops on your derailleurs are properly adjusted, now, then you do not have to worry about them.

    Some tools are required, of course -- the fore mentioned 5mm Allen wrench or Torx wrench if you opt for Campagnolo's more recent (and, supposedly more ergonomic), V3 shifters (mostly, those are 11-speed shifters ... which can ALSO be indexed to 9-speed Shimano drivetrains & will probably work with an 8-speed configuration to some extent).

    Here is Chris Juden's compatibility matrix:
    [​IMG]

    The skill level which is required is about what it takes to remove & replace the cap from a pickle jar.

    YouTube + www.parktool.com should have any necessary information if something dosn't look obvious.
     
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  20. Volnix

    Volnix Well-Known Member

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    I will I will...
     
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