Nut dents crank?

Discussion in 'rec.sport.unicycling archive' started by Klaas Bil, Apr 2, 2004.

  1. Klaas Bil

    Klaas Bil Guest

    The right crank on Het Beest, my Nimbus II Muni, creaked
    when I was out on the trail and appeared to be somewhat
    loose. Not having tools with me, I 1-footed home (in fact I
    1.2-footed) and then tried to tighten the nut but it seemed
    rock-tight. With wood and a hammer I nevertheless could
    hammer the crank further on. I tried again to tighten the
    nut using even more force, and it suddenly gave way for a
    small fraction
    (1/24) of a turn. Shoot, what was that?

    I undid the nut completely to check the threads etc, and
    found out that the nut which has anti-loosen dents on the
    underside, had deformed the crank face it has been pressing
    against for at least half a year. (The crank should be flat
    there, shouldn't it?) I tightened the nut once more, and the
    last bit went in 1/24 turn increments. I'm not sure if the
    nut is fully tight, but I can't overcome any more bumps. Nor
    do I know if the loose crank is cured well, haven't ridden
    Het Beest since. Pogosticking in the garage alternating with
    both feet forward, it looked OK. The crank is a Bicycle Euro
    170 mm, the nut may be the one that came on the Nimbus II or
    I may have swapped it.

    Does this problem sound familiar to anyone?

    The pic shows the crank face and the underside of the nut. I
    haven't checked the other crank.

    Klaas Bil

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  2. Harper

    Harper Guest

    Cool. Auto-ratcheting. I don't remember taking off steel
    cranks but if the serated nut is harder, as it obviously is
    in your case, then it's no surprise that the crank face
    will be deformed like that. All that deformation gets
    sheered off of aluminum cranks when I remove the nut
    because it's so soft.

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  3. Showard

    Showard Guest

    I've long felt that those serations on the back side of
    crank nuts do more harm than good. Of course, the idea of
    the serations is to act as a kind of ratchet and prevent the
    nut from loosening. Maybe they DO help to keep the nut from
    loosening on steel cranks (unlikely IMHO) but they chew up
    aluminum cranks. I think the serations just add resistance
    when tightening the nut - thus preventing the nut from
    adequately pushing the crank on to the taper. I've even gone
    so far as machine off the serations.

    The only real solution is to use the crank installation
    recipe that John Childs has written about many times.

    Steve Howard

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  4. Klaas Bil

    Klaas Bil Guest

    On Wed, 14 Jan 2004 21:52:08 -0600, showard
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >The only real solution is to use the crank installation
    >recipe that John Childs has written about many times.

    If I remember correctly, it focuses on hammering the cranks
    on rather than tightening the nut to get them on? That's
    basically what I do.

    Klaas Bil - Newsgroup Addict
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    I have a feeling you might need two points of contact with
    the ground for such a thing to work? Or at least training
    wheels on the front and rear. - John Foss commenting on a
    picture of a one-wheeled vehicle he saw on RSU.
     
  5. Klaas Bil wrote:
    > *suddenly gave way for a small fraction (1/24) of a turn.
    > *

    Confess, Klaas; you did not feel that it was 1/24 of a turn,
    but you counted the dents ;-)

    But even if the nut marked the crank: Shouldn't the crank
    stay where it is when properly hammered on? Hm.

    Regards, Juergen

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  6. John_childs

    John_childs Guest

    Klaas Bil wrote:
    > *On Wed, 14 Jan 2004 21:52:08 -0600, showard
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >The only real solution is to use the crank installation
    > >recipe that
    >
    > >John Childs has written about many times.
    >
    > If I remember correctly, it focuses on hammering the
    > cranks on rather than tightening the nut to get them on?
    > That's basically what I do.
    >
    > Klaas Bil - Newsgroup Addict *

    Put grease on the taper. Use a big C-clamp (bar clamp) named
    Bessey to press the cranks on. Then use red Loctite on the
    retaining nut threads.

    The Loctite is the important bit. I would suspect that with
    the Loctite you could file off the scallops on the retaining
    nut. The Loctite would keep the retaining nut from working
    loose. That would keep the scallops from digging in to the
    crank like that.

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  7. Jagur

    Jagur Guest

    i like the feeling you get from those on a steel crank arm
    while torquing down that final time.

    thump thump thump.....

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  8. Klaas Bil

    Klaas Bil Guest

    juergen_brauckmann wrote:
    > *Confess, Klaas; you did not feel that it was 1/24 of a
    > turn, but you counted the dents ;-)*
    Of course. In fact, "as soon as" the wrench lost its
    'resistance', I stopped pushing it so it felt almost the
    same as if the wrench had slipped on the nut (which is
    1/6 turn).

    > *But even if the nut marked the crank: Shouldn't the crank
    > stay where it is when properly hammered on? Hm. *
    No, the hammering on puts the crank at the right position,
    but the nut is supposed to keep it there. However, if the
    dents on nut and crank are too high, the tops of the nut
    will be in the valleys of the crank. And that may not be
    tight enough.

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  9. Klaas Bil

    Klaas Bil Guest

    john_childs wrote:
    > *The Loctite is the important bit.*
    Of course, how could I forget? A recipe by John Childs
    always contains loctite, just as some other people's recipes
    always contain pepper (or something else). :)

    Loctite, a universal spice...

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  10. Cjd

    Cjd Guest

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