Nutella fans, have I got a dessert for you!

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Nexis, Feb 10, 2005.

  1. Nexis

    Nexis Guest

    Yesterday my sister in law was over and we were watching Everyday Italian
    (at least I think that's the name) and she was talking about filling
    gyoza/wonton skins with nutella as a quick and easy dessert. Sounded
    interesting, and I had the skins in the fridge already so....
    While she was preparing the oil I went into the fridge to get the skins and
    noticed the strawberries, all red and luscious looking, and
    thought..."yummmmm"

    So, dessert last night was strawberry and nutella wontons. So easy and yet
    soooooo delicious!

    kimberly
     
    Tags:


  2. GS

    GS Guest

    Nexis wrote:
    > Yesterday my sister in law was over and we were watching Everyday Italian
    > (at least I think that's the name) and she was talking about filling
    > gyoza/wonton skins with nutella as a quick and easy dessert. Sounded
    > interesting, and I had the skins in the fridge already so....
    > While she was preparing the oil I went into the fridge to get the skins and
    > noticed the strawberries, all red and luscious looking, and
    > thought..."yummmmm"
    >
    > So, dessert last night was strawberry and nutella wontons. So easy and yet
    > soooooo delicious!
    >
    > kimberly
    >
    >

    what exactly is a gyoza/wonton skin?

    my boys live for nutella, so its worth a try!
     
  3. On Thu, 10 Feb 2005 14:25:47 -0800, "Nexis" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Yesterday my sister in law was over and we were watching Everyday Italian
    >(at least I think that's the name) and she was talking about filling
    >gyoza/wonton skins with nutella as a quick and easy dessert. Sounded
    >interesting, and I had the skins in the fridge already so....
    >While she was preparing the oil I went into the fridge to get the skins and
    >noticed the strawberries, all red and luscious looking, and
    >thought..."yummmmm"
    >
    >So, dessert last night was strawberry and nutella wontons. So easy and yet
    >soooooo delicious!


    I've thought about Nutella, but the strawberries are a stroke of pure evil
    genius! Thanks!

    Carol
    --
    "Years ago my mother used to say to me... She'd say,
    'In this world Elwood, you must be oh-so smart or oh-so pleasant.'
    Well, for years I was smart.... I recommend pleasant. You may quote me."

    *James Stewart* in the 1950 movie, _Harvey_
     
  4. nancree

    nancree Guest

    Wonton wrappers are used in Chinese cooking-- often with fillings for
    appetizer. Your supermarket will probably have them in the deli
    case--wrapped packages , about 3 or 4 inches square. Here's a recipe to
    give you an idea how they are sometimes used.

    http://www.24hourfitness.com/html/nutrition/recipes/soups/soup

    Nancree
     
  5. nancree

    nancree Guest

  6. Mite

    Mite Guest

    In article <%[email protected]>, GS <[email protected]_spam.com>
    wrote:

    > Nexis wrote:
    > > Yesterday my sister in law was over and we were watching Everyday Italian
    > > (at least I think that's the name) and she was talking about filling
    > > gyoza/wonton skins with nutella as a quick and easy dessert. Sounded
    > > interesting, and I had the skins in the fridge already so....
    > > While she was preparing the oil I went into the fridge to get the skins and
    > > noticed the strawberries, all red and luscious looking, and
    > > thought..."yummmmm"
    > >
    > > So, dessert last night was strawberry and nutella wontons. So easy and yet
    > > soooooo delicious!
    > >
    > > kimberly
    > >
    > >

    > what exactly is a gyoza/wonton skin?
    >
    > my boys live for nutella, so its worth a try!


    To make gyoza skins:

    Mix flour with a bit of water (just enough so that it forms a ball),
    knead. Let rest in a covered bowl 30 min to 1 hour.
    If you have a machine to make pasta, roll it thin and cut into 3-4 inch
    circles. Otherwise, shape the dough into a cylinder of 1 inch diameter,
    cut it in 1/4 inch slices, and roll into a thin skin.

    See also my recipe for gyoza at
    http://www.rufenacht.com/webapps/recipes/index.jsp?recId=30

    Mite
    http://www.shopncook.com
     
  7. Nexis

    Nexis Guest

    "Damsel in dis Dress" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > On Thu, 10 Feb 2005 14:25:47 -0800, "Nexis" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >Yesterday my sister in law was over and we were watching Everyday Italian
    > >(at least I think that's the name) and she was talking about filling
    > >gyoza/wonton skins with nutella as a quick and easy dessert. Sounded
    > >interesting, and I had the skins in the fridge already so....
    > >While she was preparing the oil I went into the fridge to get the skins

    and
    > >noticed the strawberries, all red and luscious looking, and
    > >thought..."yummmmm"
    > >
    > >So, dessert last night was strawberry and nutella wontons. So easy and

    yet
    > >soooooo delicious!

    >
    > I've thought about Nutella, but the strawberries are a stroke of pure evil
    > genius! Thanks!
    >
    > Carol
    > --


    And the beauty part was, when I tested later, my BG was only 108!
    It's decadent, so you can eat just a couple and feel like you've been way
    naughtier than you really were! lol

    kimberly
     
  8. "Nexis" <[email protected]> , if that's their real name, wrote:

    >
    >"Damsel in dis Dress" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:[email protected]
    >>
    >> I've thought about Nutella, but the strawberries are a stroke of pure evil
    >> genius! Thanks!

    >
    >And the beauty part was, when I tested later, my BG was only 108!
    >It's decadent, so you can eat just a couple and feel like you've been way
    >naughtier than you really were! lol


    But ... is it possible to stop at just a couple? This is me you're talking
    to. :)

    Carol
    --
    "Years ago my mother used to say to me... She'd say,
    'In this world Elwood, you must be oh-so smart or oh-so pleasant.'
    Well, for years I was smart.... I recommend pleasant. You may quote me."

    *James Stewart* in the 1950 movie, _Harvey_
     
  9. Anvy Owens

    Anvy Owens Guest

    Do you fry them after filling the wanton skin??



    "Damsel in dis Dress" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > "Nexis" <[email protected]> , if that's their real name, wrote:
    >
    > >
    > >"Damsel in dis Dress" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > >news:[email protected]
    > >>
    > >> I've thought about Nutella, but the strawberries are a stroke of pure

    evil
    > >> genius! Thanks!

    > >
    > >And the beauty part was, when I tested later, my BG was only 108!
    > >It's decadent, so you can eat just a couple and feel like you've been way
    > >naughtier than you really were! lol

    >
    > But ... is it possible to stop at just a couple? This is me you're

    talking
    > to. :)
    >
    > Carol
    > --
    > "Years ago my mother used to say to me... She'd say,
    > 'In this world Elwood, you must be oh-so smart or oh-so pleasant.'
    > Well, for years I was smart.... I recommend pleasant. You may quote me."
    >
    > *James Stewart* in the 1950 movie, _Harvey_
     
  10. Nexis

    Nexis Guest

    "Damsel in dis Dress" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > "Nexis" <[email protected]> , if that's their real name, wrote:
    >
    > >
    > >"Damsel in dis Dress" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > >news:[email protected]
    > >>
    > >> I've thought about Nutella, but the strawberries are a stroke of pure

    evil
    > >> genius! Thanks!

    > >
    > >And the beauty part was, when I tested later, my BG was only 108!
    > >It's decadent, so you can eat just a couple and feel like you've been way
    > >naughtier than you really were! lol

    >
    > But ... is it possible to stop at just a couple? This is me you're

    talking
    > to. :)
    >
    > Carol
    > --


    LOL, well, it's not as hard as you'd think. I think it would be difficult to
    eat more than, say, 4 at any one time. Like I said, they're very decadent!
    I have to say, it was a really fun dessert to make too. The kids had a blast
    filling and folding the wontons, and they actually worked together for the
    entire time without a single word of disagreement between them! (If you'd
    ever spent time with my daughter and my niece in the same room, you'd know
    what a miracle that really is!)

    kimberly
     
  11. Nexis

    Nexis Guest

  12. "Nexis" <[email protected]>, if that's their real name, wrote:

    >"Damsel in dis Dress" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:[email protected]
    >> "Nexis" <[email protected]> , if that's their real name, wrote:
    >>
    >> >And the beauty part was, when I tested later, my BG was only 108!
    >> >It's decadent, so you can eat just a couple and feel like you've been way
    >> >naughtier than you really were! lol

    >>
    >> But ... is it possible to stop at just a couple? This is me you're
    >> talking to. :)
    >> --

    >LOL, well, it's not as hard as you'd think. I think it would be difficult to
    >eat more than, say, 4 at any one time. Like I said, they're very decadent!
    >I have to say, it was a really fun dessert to make too.


    Yeah, they do sound pretty rich. I'll have to give these a try. I'm not
    sure if you mentioned anything like this in your original post or not, but
    did you happen to sift some powdered sugar over them?

    Carol
    --
    "Years ago my mother used to say to me... She'd say,
    'In this world Elwood, you must be oh-so smart or oh-so pleasant.'
    Well, for years I was smart.... I recommend pleasant. You may quote me."

    *James Stewart* in the 1950 movie, _Harvey_
     
  13. Nexis

    Nexis Guest

    "Damsel in dis Dress" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > "Nexis" <[email protected]>, if that's their real name, wrote:
    >
    > >"Damsel in dis Dress" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > >news:[email protected]
    > >> "Nexis" <[email protected]> , if that's their real name, wrote:
    > >>
    > >> >And the beauty part was, when I tested later, my BG was only 108!
    > >> >It's decadent, so you can eat just a couple and feel like you've been

    way
    > >> >naughtier than you really were! lol
    > >>
    > >> But ... is it possible to stop at just a couple? This is me you're
    > >> talking to. :)
    > >> --

    > >LOL, well, it's not as hard as you'd think. I think it would be difficult

    to
    > >eat more than, say, 4 at any one time. Like I said, they're very

    decadent!
    > >I have to say, it was a really fun dessert to make too.

    >
    > Yeah, they do sound pretty rich. I'll have to give these a try. I'm not
    > sure if you mentioned anything like this in your original post or not, but
    > did you happen to sift some powdered sugar over them?
    >
    > Carol



    Not on mine, but I did on the others. For me, I don't need the added sugar,
    and plus, I had a bad experience with a powdered sugar dusted doughnut
    once.... lol
    If you do try them, let me know what you think.

    kimberly
     
  14. "Nexis" <[email protected]>, if that's their real name, wrote:

    >If you do try them, let me know what you think.


    I sure will. They sound heavenly. :)

    Carol
    --
    "Years ago my mother used to say to me... She'd say,
    'In this world Elwood, you must be oh-so smart or oh-so pleasant.'
    Well, for years I was smart.... I recommend pleasant. You may quote me."

    *James Stewart* in the 1950 movie, _Harvey_
     
  15. Nexis wrote:

    > "Damsel in dis Dress" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >
    >> "Nexis" <[email protected]>, if that's their real name, wrote:
    >>
    >>> "Damsel in dis Dress" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >>> news:[email protected]
    >>>
    >>>> But ... is it possible to stop at just a couple? This is me
    >>>> you're talking to. :)
    >>>
    >>> LOL, well, it's not as hard as you'd think. I think it would be
    >>> difficult to eat more than, say, 4 at any one time. Like I
    >>> said, they're very decadent! I have to say, it was a really fun
    >>> dessert to make too.

    >>
    >> Yeah, they do sound pretty rich. I'll have to give these a try.
    >> I'm not sure if you mentioned anything like this in your original
    >> post or not, but did you happen to sift some powdered sugar over
    >> them?
    >>
    >> Carol

    >
    > Not on mine, but I did on the others. For me, I don't need the
    > added sugar, and plus, I had a bad experience with a powdered sugar
    > dusted doughnut once.... lol If you do try them, let me know what
    > you think.


    Look below for a recipe for piadine. They're thin, crisp, flat, round
    Italian pastries that you cook on a griddle. Put some Nutella on on
    side of one and fold it in half and finish as recipe calls for. Or
    spread Nutella on one whole side of one (stay 1/2" from the edge) and
    top with another one. Press edges together and cook. Simply astonishing.

    Piadine (pyah-dee-neh)
    Makes 8 to 10, depending on how big you want them

    This Italian flat bread is usually made with flour, salt, water and
    lard and dry-fried on a griddle or cast iron pan. It is wonderful as a
    sandwich base for cured meats and cheeses. It can also be made into a
    dessert item by filling before cooking as described below.

    3 cups of all-purpose flour
    1 teaspoon salt
    6 tablespoons of lard or shortening
    1/2 cup warm water
    Combine flour and salt in a large bowl. Make a well in the flour and
    add the lard and the water. Mix well and knead on a lightly floured
    surface until smooth and elastic, between 5 and 10 minutes. Cover with
    a floured towel for about 20 minutes. Knead again and divide into 8
    to 10 equal pieces. Sprinkle with flour and roll out into a 6- to
    8-inch wide circle, about 1/4 inch thick. Dock (pierce) with a fork
    and cook on a dry griddle or cast iron frying pan for 2-3 minutes on
    each side.

    Test the pan with a few drops of cold water. It's ready when the water
    skips and skitters across its surface. If the water just sits and
    boils, the pan is not hot enough to use. When it's ready, drop a disk
    of dough onto the griddle . When cooked, little charred bubbles form
    on the dough, it's ready. They need to be checked fairly regularly as
    the process goes quickly. When cooked, stack the piadine under a
    towel or tuck them into a paper bag so they stay warm.

    Piadine can be used as a base on which other foods are piled. In that
    case, serve warm with cured meats and fresh cheeses. A salad piled on
    it goes well with the chewy, dense texture. Or, brush lightly with
    olive oil, sprinkle with fresh chopped rosemary and salt like a foccacia.

    Alternatively, spread filling on one half of the piadina, fold over
    the other half and cut into two wedges, or sandwich the filling
    between two piadine and cut into quarters. Fillings can be chopped or
    ground cheeses, meats like mortadella, grilled and thinly sliced
    sausages or anything else that lends itself to being spread

    Or you can spread a thin layer of Nutella or something like it on half
    the uncooked piadina. Fold the other half over and crimp the edges.
    Cook as usual. Careful eating it, the filling will be hot.


    There's also a YEAST BREAD VARIANT. I do it in a food processor, but
    it can be done with a mixer with bread hooks or by hand.
    1 envelope active dry yeast (2 1/4 teaspoons)
    1 cup warm water (110?F)
    3 to 3 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
    2 tablespoons olive oil
    1 teaspoon salt
    olive oil to finish
    In a bowl, combine yeast, water and 2 tablespoons of the flour. Let
    proof about 5 minutes. Add 3 cups of flour, the oil, and salt, and
    stir with a heavy spoon to make a dough. Turn out onto a floured
    surface and knead until smooth, adding more flour if needed to make a
    soft but still slightly moist dough. Shape into a ball, dust with
    flour and cover with a floured towel to rise until doubled, about 45
    minutes. Punch it down, knead, and cut into 8 equal pieces. Roll each
    piece to a circle about 1/4-inch thick, 6 to 8 inches in diameter.
    Dock the dough and cook on the griddle as above until golden with some
    dark spots. Remove, brush lightly with the olive oil and repeat with
    the remaining dough. Roll the bread around the toppings of choice and
    serve warm

    In a processor, I put the yeast, water and a bit of flour in the bowl,
    run it for maybe 20 seconds. I let them work for 10 minutes or so to
    get the yeast moving. Then dump everything in and run it for about 45
    seconds. It forms a ball. The dough should be soft and slightly
    sticky. I put it into sprayed bowl to rise. Cover with plastic wrap.
    Finish as above.
     
  16. Scott

    Scott Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, "Nexis" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    > Yesterday my sister in law was over and we were watching Everyday Italian
    > (at least I think that's the name) and she was talking about filling
    > gyoza/wonton skins with nutella as a quick and easy dessert. Sounded
    > interesting, and I had the skins in the fridge already so....
    > While she was preparing the oil I went into the fridge to get the skins and
    > noticed the strawberries, all red and luscious looking, and
    > thought..."yummmmm"


    A creperie opened up not far from me, and they serve something like this
    (Nutella and strawberries, crepe-sized, of course). Very good.

    --
    to respond (OT only), change "spamless.invalid" to "optonline.net"

    <http://www.thecoffeefaq.com/>
     
Loading...