NYC Bike Ride



M

Maggie

Guest
I did the Breast Cancer Walk in the city yesterday...anyone do the MS
bike ride. I was torn between the two....the walk won out. My aunt
died of Breast Cancer so I walked for her. Was wondering if anyone was
at the bike ride for MS.

Maggie
 
B

bryanska

Guest
Can someone explain to me why people give money because others are
walking or biking?

I biked the MS 150 last year, and am certainly not complaining. But
what's the difference between giving to a charity ride and simply
donating the money directly to the foundation?

It seems to boil down to the spectacle. That, to me, seems the only
reason. "I'll give if you ride your bike from here to there."
 
G

Gary Smiley

Guest
Usually the rationale is: "I'm going to stress myself out by doing something
physically difficult, like riding a bicycle from Boston to New York, in
hopes that you will recognize my superhuman effort and suffering and give to
help the REAL sufferers- the people with horrible diseases". Unfortunately,
most riders look upon it as an all-expenses-paid bike ride supported by
their friends where charity will benefit as well. But since I LIKE to ride,
and since I've done tours that are longer than most charity rides, I'm not
really putting myself out that much. So I have no justification for asking
for money for my favorite charity. I would prefer to spend my own money and
ride somewhere where the riding is wonderful, like the south of France, and
eat the food and drink the wine and celebrate my good health (while I can).
The only thing I ask in return is that my friends look at my photos.

"bryanska" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> Can someone explain to me why people give money because others are
> walking or biking?
>
> I biked the MS 150 last year, and am certainly not complaining. But
> what's the difference between giving to a charity ride and simply
> donating the money directly to the foundation?
>
> It seems to boil down to the spectacle. That, to me, seems the only
> reason. "I'll give if you ride your bike from here to there."
>
 
B

bryanska

Guest
>Unfortunately,
>most riders look upon it as an all-expenses-paid bike ride supported by
>their friends where charity will benefit as well.


I gotta tell ya, that's exactly how I view it. But I did raise $300.
Morally, it's a grey area.
 
L

Leo Lichtman

Guest
"bryanska" wrote: I gotta tell ya, that's exactly how I view it. But I did
raise $300. Morally, it's a grey area.
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
The problem I have with this process is that after you have gone around to
all your friends and collected donations/sponsorship, they will feel, and
you will feel, that you owe them when they come to you. I would rather
donate my own money by going on charity rides of my choice, so I don't feel
like I am on a treadmill running backwards the rest of the year.
 
S

Steve B.

Guest
<[email protected]> wrote in message
....
> Dying on a bike is one of the two ways I'd like to go


Boy, no kidding. It's in all the local NYC area news, and I truly feel
sorry for friends and family, but couldn't help thinking "What a great way
to go - riding along and BOOM, fall over dead". Would rather it happens
when I'm 80 something and cannot remember how to get home from my last bike
ride (Alzheimers runs in the family).

SB
 
C

Claire Petersky

Guest
"bryanska" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> Can someone explain to me why people give money because others are
> walking or biking?


Or why people find it motivating to bike or walk, in support of cures for a
disease? I had this conversation with a friend of mine. It's like
participating in a peace march. Somehow, by getting together and doing
something as a group, we hope it has more power or it has more meaning
personally, than not doing it, or doing something individually. It's an
interesting phenomenon.

> I biked the MS 150 last year, and am certainly not complaining. But
> what's the difference between giving to a charity ride and simply
> donating the money directly to the foundation?


And I climbed the tallest building in downtown Seattle because a friend of
mine has leukemia. She lives near Boston, and I feel rather helpless. Other
friends who live near her can visit, or cook her family a meal or take her
daughter out to the movies. What can I do -- well, I guess it's climb 72
flights of stairs.

But if I went to a bunch of friends and relatives, and said, please give to
leukemia because I care about my friend? Would any of them do that? But they
seem willing to sponsor me to do the Big Climb.

At least, when I've done events like this, I always give a donation myself
large enough to cover the expenses of the event, so my friends' donations
can "count" for the charity. I don't think I can ask my friends and family
to pay for my cycling vacation, really, can I?

--
Warm Regards,

Claire Petersky
Personal page: http://www.geocities.com/cpetersky/
See the books I've set free at:
http://bookcrossing.com/referral/Cpetersky
 
M

Maggie

Guest
bryanska wrote:
> Can someone explain to me why people give money because others are
> walking or biking?
>
> I biked the MS 150 last year, and am certainly not complaining. But
> what's the difference between giving to a charity ride and simply
> donating the money directly to the foundation?
>
> It seems to boil down to the spectacle. That, to me, seems the only
> reason. "I'll give if you ride your bike from here to there."



Can someone explain to me why I ask a simple question and get a lecture
concerning charity bike rides or walks? We have a right to
congregate. Whether to raise money, support a cause, defend a freedom,
or protest a war. I think that is a beautiful thing. Yes, we can all
sit at home and write a check and mail it in, but there is something
very strong and powerful in coming together for a cause.

The right to peacefully gather and parade or demonstrate to make one's
views known or to support or oppose a public policy is based upon the
guarantees of the freedom of speech and the right to peaceably
assemble.

Charity rides should live on in my opinion. It is not the writing of
the check as much as the gathering together to show support of a cause.
Do you know how many people participated in MAKING STRIDES FOR BREAST
CANCER last Sunday? It brings the cause to the forefront when people
assemble in such strong numbers to help find a cure. This is one of
our many rights.

All I asked was, did anyone participate in the MS walk? If I could
have been two places at once...I would not have asked.

Thanks for your opinions concerning gathering together for a cause and
pulling money out of your friends so you can ride a bike 50 miles or
walk 10 miles. It is the coming together as a group, not the money that
brings things to the public....you can write your own damn check, and
then ride or walk. Exercise your right to assemble for a cause. If you
are passionate about the cause you want that assembly of people riding
and walking.

Yes, we can mail a check. I'll rather join in the cause. Physically
show support. I would rather exercise my right to gather in large
numbers to bring light on a subject and knowledge to those uninformed
then sit in my living room and write a check and mail a letter. Maybe
it stems from being a product of the sixties....but I believe in
charity rides, walks and runs. It's all good. Sorry for all the
redundancy but it is 6:00 a.m. and this thread ****** me off.

Maggie
So long as we have enough people in this country willing to fight for
their rights, we'll be called a democracy.
 
R

Roger Zoul

Guest
Maggie <[email protected]> wrote:
:> bryanska wrote:
:>> Can someone explain to me why people give money because others are
:>> walking or biking?
:>>
:>> I biked the MS 150 last year, and am certainly not complaining. But
:>> what's the difference between giving to a charity ride and simply
:>> donating the money directly to the foundation?
:>>
:>> It seems to boil down to the spectacle. That, to me, seems the only
:>> reason. "I'll give if you ride your bike from here to there."
:>
:>
:> Can someone explain to me why I ask a simple question and get a
:> lecture concerning charity bike rides or walks? We have a right to
:> congregate. Whether to raise money, support a cause, defend a
:> freedom, or protest a war. I think that is a beautiful thing. Yes,
:> we can all sit at home and write a check and mail it in, but there
:> is something very strong and powerful in coming together for a cause.
:>
:> The right to peacefully gather and parade or demonstrate to make
:> one's views known or to support or oppose a public policy is based
:> upon the guarantees of the freedom of speech and the right to
:> peaceably assemble.
:>
:> Charity rides should live on in my opinion. It is not the writing of
:> the check as much as the gathering together to show support of a
:> cause. Do you know how many people participated in MAKING STRIDES
:> FOR BREAST CANCER last Sunday? It brings the cause to the forefront
:> when people assemble in such strong numbers to help find a cure.
:> This is one of our many rights.
:>
:> All I asked was, did anyone participate in the MS walk? If I could
:> have been two places at once...I would not have asked.
:>
:> Thanks for your opinions concerning gathering together for a cause
:> and pulling money out of your friends so you can ride a bike 50
:> miles or walk 10 miles. It is the coming together as a group, not
:> the money that brings things to the public....you can write your own
:> damn check, and then ride or walk. Exercise your right to assemble
:> for a cause. If you are passionate about the cause you want that
:> assembly of people riding and walking.
:>
:> Yes, we can mail a check. I'll rather join in the cause. Physically
:> show support. I would rather exercise my right to gather in large
:> numbers to bring light on a subject and knowledge to those uninformed
:> then sit in my living room and write a check and mail a letter. Maybe
:> it stems from being a product of the sixties....but I believe in
:> charity rides, walks and runs. It's all good. Sorry for all the
:> redundancy but it is 6:00 a.m. and this thread ****** me off.

You get ****** off far too easily. People were making general conversations
related to a topic you brought up. None one was lecturing you - which I'm
sure you realize. And do you really feel you have some extra little insight
on this topic that others here don't? Lighten up, Maggie. People here are
really nice, compared to other newsgroups out there.
 
M

Maggie

Guest
Roger Zoul wrote:
Lighten up, Maggie. People here are
> really nice, compared to other newsgroups out there.



Roger, telling me to lighten up at 6:00 a.m. after moving and shuffling
4 cars in the driveway, that I do not even drive and walking a 100 lb
Labrador that chases every small animal in sight while dragging me
behind her.....is not an easy request. But I will try. ;-)

Maggie
 
R

Roger Zoul

Guest
Maggie <lbu[email protected]> wrote:
:> Roger Zoul wrote:
:> Lighten up, Maggie. People here are
:>> really nice, compared to other newsgroups out there.
:>
:>
:> Roger, telling me to lighten up at 6:00 a.m. after moving and
:> shuffling 4 cars in the driveway, that I do not even drive and
:> walking a 100 lb Labrador that chases every small animal in sight
:> while dragging me behind her.....is not an easy request. But I will
:> try. ;-)
:>

I'm sure you'll get there, Mags! :)
 
Maggie wrote:
> Roger Zoul wrote:
> Lighten up, Maggie. People here are
> > really nice, compared to other newsgroups out there.

>
>
> Roger, telling me to lighten up at 6:00 a.m. after moving and shuffling
> 4 cars in the driveway, that I do not even drive and walking a 100 lb
> Labrador that chases every small animal in sight while dragging me
> behind her.....is not an easy request. But I will try. ;-)
>
> Maggie


Get the Lab to tow the cars. That saves you the trouble and should tire
her out quite nicely.

John Kane, Kingston ON Canada
 
M

Maggie

Guest
[email protected] wrote:
>
> Get the Lab to tow the cars. That saves you the trouble and should tire
> her out quite nicely.
>
> John Kane, Kingston ON Canada



Sounds like a fine idea....she can tow me on my bike. I guess she can
tow the car....her name is Maggie Mae Rose III and she is on my website
in the Hooded sweatshirt....she can do ANYTHING.

http://hometown.aol.com/lbuset/
 
P

Pat Lamb

Guest
Gary Smiley wrote:
> I would prefer to spend my own money and
> ride somewhere where the riding is wonderful, like the south of France, and
> eat the food and drink the wine and celebrate my good health (while I can).
> The only thing I ask in return is that my friends look at my photos.


Some people might prefer pledging money to a charity ride...

:)