NZ Travel questions

Discussion in 'Australia and New Zealand' started by dswarthout, Nov 16, 2003.

  1. dswarthout

    dswarthout Guest

    I'm heading to New Zealand in January for a three month bicycle trip and
    wonder about the availablilty of Internet or cybercafes where I might be
    able to send digital photos to the US via email. I know Internet for
    general emailing is available everywhere but are cafes that offer upload
    capability available, common, rare?

    Also, seeing as I'm taking a digital camera and its batteries will need
    to be recharged every so often, what sort of power line plugs are in use
    in NZ? Here in the US we use a two-bladed plug that is, well, ubiquitous
    but I've seen other plugs for travel in Europe that look nothing like
    the U.S. standard one. Can anyone help?

    Thanks, Dave Swarthout Homer, Alaska



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  2. Ray Peace

    Ray Peace Guest

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    Greetings, <br>
    You're going to have problems with the plugs, as the US uses
    110 volts and NZ uses 240 volts, so try minimising any mains gadgets you
    may have, as none of them will work. Adaptor plugs for 240 volt devices are
    available from travel shops. <br>
    Cheers, <br>
    Ray. <br>
    <br>
    dswarthout wrote:<br>
    <blockquote type="cite" cite="mid:[email protected]">
    <pre wrap="">I'm heading to New Zealand in January for a three month bicycle trip and<br>wonder about the availablilty of Internet or cybercafes where I might be<br>able to send digital photos to the US via email. I know Internet for<br>general emailing is available everywhere but are cafes that offer upload<br>capability available, common, rare?<br><br>Also, seeing as I'm taking a digital camera and its batteries will need<br>to be recharged every so often, what sort of power line plugs are in use<br>in NZ? Here in the US we use a two-bladed plug that is, well, ubiquitous<br>but I've seen other plugs for travel in Europe that look nothing like<br>the U.S. standard one. Can anyone help?<br><br>Thanks, Dave Swarthout Homer, Alaska<br><br><br><br>--<br></pre>
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    <pre wrap=""><!---->Posted via cyclingforums.com<br><a class="moz-txt-link-freetext" href="http://www.cyclingforums.com">http://www.cyclingforums.com</a><br></pre>
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  3. davef

    davef Guest

    ***
    I know Internet for general emailing is available everywhere but are
    cafes that offer upload capability available, common, rare?
    ***

    My bet is "rare". My son says, "Starbucks are planning on putting
    infared capability in their shop in Christchurch". He thinks that maybe
    if you talk nicely to the provider you could install the software on the
    computer you are hiring.

    If you want to provide some more details of what is involved I could
    make a few phone calls.

    ***
    Here in the US we use a two-bladed plug that is, well, ubiquitous but
    I've seen other plugs for travel in Europe that look nothing like the
    U.S. standard one. Can anyone help?
    ***

    Well, not "ubiquitous enough"! NZ and Australia use a rather unusual 3
    pin plug. Also, we are 240 Volts and 50 Hz which might make a
    difference.

    Cheers davef



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  4. On 17 Nov 2003 06:30:14 +1050, dswarthout
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I'm heading to New Zealand in January for a three month bicycle trip and
    >wonder about the availablilty of Internet or cybercafes where I might be
    >able to send digital photos to the US via email. I know Internet for
    >general emailing is available everywhere but are cafes that offer upload
    >capability available, common, rare?
    >
    >Also, seeing as I'm taking a digital camera and its batteries will need
    >to be recharged every so often, what sort of power line plugs are in use
    >in NZ? Here in the US we use a two-bladed plug that is, well, ubiquitous
    >but I've seen other plugs for travel in Europe that look nothing like
    >the U.S. standard one. Can anyone help?
    >
    >Thanks, Dave Swarthout Homer, Alaska


    Hey Dave,

    New Zealand uses the same plug as Australia, with 240V, 50Hz supply.
    Nothing like any European ones. You may need a whole new recharger for
    your camera. If you are coming via SE Asia, stop off and buy one, coz
    it will probably be cheaper than in NZ.

    Internet cafes are in any decent sized town in NZ, but whether or not
    they will let you plug your camera into a computer is questionable.

    You should try posting to rec.travel.australia+nz, coz this really is
    their area!
    ---
    DFM
     
  5. hippy

    hippy Guest

    "dswarthout" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > I'm heading to New Zealand in January for a three month bicycle trip

    and
    > wonder about the availablilty of Internet or cybercafes where I might

    be
    > able to send digital photos to the US via email. I know Internet for
    > general emailing is available everywhere but are cafes that offer

    upload
    > capability available, common, rare?


    Do you mean "upload" as in transfer the images from the
    camera to the computer for sending or do you mean, say,
    ftp to a remote server from an internet cafe?

    If you mean tranfer from camera, in Japan I got the photo
    labs to burn cd's containing the images taken from the
    CompactFlash card in the camera. You could get this
    done and then just email the images by attaching them
    from the CD in normal internet cafes.
    You could also get yourself a small card reader which
    just plugs into the computer via USB. These are pretty
    cheap and heaps faster than camera-pc transfer anyway.
    You still have to convince the 'net cafe to let you plug it
    in though and it might need driver software on older
    versions of Windows.
    The cafes may even have compact flash (or other) card
    readers available for use?

    hippy
     
  6. tony f

    tony f Guest

    On 17 Nov 2003 06:30:14 +1050, dswarthout
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I'm heading to New Zealand in January for a three month bicycle trip and
    >wonder about the availablilty of Internet or cybercafes where I might be
    >able to send digital photos to the US via email. I know Internet for
    >general emailing is available everywhere but are cafes that offer upload
    >capability available, common, rare?


    We only tried in one, and if we'd had the cables, and software, we'd
    have had success - but we didn't. ;^(

    Internet cafes were in most big towns and a few smmaller ones.

    Someone else mentioned places that will burn from camera (or direct
    from cards) to CD - these are everywhere, and have the added bonus of
    freeing up your camera's card for more shots - and you'll want to take
    lots - NZ is beautiful.

    Tony F
    www.thefathippy.com
     
  7. Mike

    Mike Guest

    Ray Peace wrote:
    > Greetings,
    > You're going to have problems with the plugs, as the US
    > uses 110 volts and NZ uses 240 volts, so try minimising any mains
    > gadgets you may have, as none of them will work.


    Thats not true. Lots of power supplies sold in the US are multi-voltage
    switch-mode devices. Just check the label.
     
  8. dswarthout

    dswarthout Guest

    Tony F wrote:
    > On 17 Nov 2003 06:30:14 +1050, dswarthout
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >I'm heading to New Zealand in January for a three month bicycle trip
    > >and wonder about the availablilty of Internet or cybercafes where I
    > >might be able to send digital photos to the US via email. I know
    > >Internet for general emailing is available everywhere but are cafes
    > >that offer upload capability available, common, rare?

    > We only tried in one, and if we'd had the cables, and software, we'd
    > have had success - but we didn't. ;^(
    > Internet cafes were in most big towns and a few smmaller ones.
    > Someone else mentioned places that will burn from camera (or direct from
    > cards) to CD - these are everywhere, and have the added bonus of freeing
    > up your camera's card for more shots - and you'll want to take lots - NZ
    > is beautiful.
    > Tony F www.thefathippy.com



    Thanks to all who responded for the quality feedback. My camera uses
    compact flash memory and I already have a CF reader with USB connector,
    so that part's taken care of. Burning a CD once in a while and sending
    it home is an excellent idea (and one I hadn't thought of), so all I
    need to do is locate a charger or adapter that will allow me to charge
    my Nikon's batteries using the NZ power plug. Now that I know what's
    required I'm sure I can find something on the Internet that will work.
    Thanks again, Dave Swarthout



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  9. dswarthout

    dswarthout Guest

    davef wrote:
    > ***
    > I know Internet for general emailing is available everywhere but are
    > cafes that offer upload capability available, common, rare?
    > ***
    > My bet is "rare". My son says, "Starbucks are planning on putting
    > infared capability in their shop in Christchurch". He thinks that maybe
    > if you talk nicely to the provider you could install the software on the
    > computer you are hiring.
    > If you want to provide some more details of what is involved I could
    > make a few phone calls.
    > ***
    > Here in the US we use a two-bladed plug that is, well, ubiquitous but
    > I've seen other plugs for travel in Europe that look nothing like the
    > U.S. standard one. Can anyone help?
    > ***
    > Well, not "ubiquitous enough"! NZ and Australia use a rather unusual 3
    > pin plug. Also, we are 240 Volts and 50 Hz which might make a
    > difference.
    > Cheers davef



    Sorry, I should have said "unbiquitous here." <g> Other posters have
    given me enough advice to know what to buy -- it turns out my charger
    will run on 240v 50 HZ so I only need an adapter to mate the two
    dissimilar plug configurations. Should I buy the three prong grounded
    adapter or will a two-prong ungrounded work. My charger doesn't care, so
    it's question of which type of outlet is more commonly found in NZ,
    grounded or not. Again, thanks, Dave Swarthout Homer, Alaska



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  10. Theo Bekkers

    Theo Bekkers Guest

    "dswarthout" wrote
    > davef wrote:


    > > Well, not "ubiquitous enough"! NZ and Australia use a rather

    unusual 3
    > > pin plug. Also, we are 240 Volts and 50 Hz which might make a
    > > difference.


    > Sorry, I should have said "unbiquitous here." <g> Other posters have
    > given me enough advice to know what to buy -- it turns out my

    charger
    > will run on 240v 50 HZ so I only need an adapter to mate the two
    > dissimilar plug configurations. Should I buy the three prong

    grounded
    > adapter or will a two-prong ungrounded work. My charger doesn't

    care, so
    > it's question of which type of outlet is more commonly found in NZ,
    > grounded or not.


    http://www.accesscomms.com.au/powerplug.htm

    All sockets are three pin but and two pin plugs (without earth) will
    plug in to any three pin socket. Also used in Fiji.

    Theo
     
  11. Dorre

    Dorre Guest

    Theo Bekkers <[email protected]> wrote:
    : "dswarthout" wrote
    :> davef wrote:
    : http://www.accesscomms.com.au/powerplug.htm
    : All sockets are three pin but and two pin plugs (without earth) will
    : plug in to any three pin socket. Also used in Fiji.

    Another possibility worth considering if visiting several different
    countries it to get something that plugs into shaver sockets. These
    are common in most hotel/motels use the same plug in the US, UK, Europe
    and Australasia. They can even be set to the required voltage.

    Dorre
     
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