Oatmeal Question



C

Connieg999

Guest
I have a recipe that calls for uncooked rolled oats. I have a tin of McCann's steel-cut oats. I know
what the difference in the two is, but what I don't know is, can I replace the rolled oats in the
recipe with the steel-cut oats?

Connie
*****************************************************
My mind is like a steel...um, whatchamacallit.
 
R

Richard Periut

Guest
ConnieG999 wrote:
> I have a recipe that calls for uncooked rolled oats. I have a tin of McCann's steel-cut oats. I
> know what the difference in the two is, but what I don't know is, can I replace the rolled oats in
> the recipe with the steel-cut oats?
>
> Connie
> *****************************************************
> My mind is like a steel...um, whatchamacallit.
>

How will you be using the oats? If it's in meatloaf, you will have to cook the oats enough, so that
they wont turn out hard in your meatloaf. If it's in other recipes, it may be different.

Rich

--
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Dum spiro, spero. (Cicero) As long as I breathe, I hope.
 
D

Dave Smith

Guest
ConnieG999 wrote:

> I have a recipe that calls for uncooked rolled oats. I have a tin of McCann's steel-cut oats. I
> know what the difference in the two is, but what I don't know is, can I replace the rolled oats in
> the recipe with the steel-cut oats?

If the recipe is for oatmeal porridge you can do it with the steel cut oats. Just increase the
cooking time. I can't see substituting steel cut oats for most other recipes because they take so
much longer to cook.
 
P

Penmart01

Guest
>(LazyConnieG999)
>
>I have a recipe that calls for uncooked rolled oats. I have a tin of McCann's steel-cut oats. I
>know what the difference in the two is, but what I don't know is, can I replace the rolled oats in
>the recipe with the steel-cut oats?

---= BOYCOTT FRENCH--GERMAN (belgium) =--- ---= Move UNITED NATIONS To Paris =--- Sheldon
```````````` "Life would be devoid of all meaning were it without tribulation."
 
C

Connieg999

Guest
[email protected] (PENMART01) writes:

Don't get your panties in a wad, Sheldon. Here;s the recipe.

Scottish Pancakes

1.5 cups rolled oats (uncooked) 2 cups buttermilk
2.5 tsp sugar 1 tbsp ("well-rounded") baking soda .5 cup flour 2 eggs

Mix oats and buttermilk; let stand 5 minutes. Add remaining ingredients to mixture and blend until
relatively smooth. Drop by spoonfuls on a hot greased griddle; cakes should be about 4 inches
diameter. Turn when most surface bubbles begin to break, to brown the top side.

Connie
*****************************************************
My mind is like a steel...um, whatchamacallit.
 
D

Darryl L. Pierc

Guest
On Wed, 28 Jan 2004 21:27:31 +0000, ConnieG999 wrote:

> I have a recipe that calls for uncooked rolled oats. I have a tin of McCann's steel-cut oats. I
> know what the difference in the two is, but what I don't know is, can I replace the rolled oats in
> the recipe with the steel-cut oats?

Doubtful. They're of different quality and consistency. You should just pick up some rolled oats at
the grocer and use them instead and save the Irish oats for making porridge.

--
Darryl L. Pierce <[email protected]> Visit the Infobahn Offramp - <http://mypage.org/mcpierce>
"What do you care what other people think, Mr. Feynman?"
 
R

Robert Klute

Guest
On 28 Jan 2004 22:30:56 GMT, [email protected] (ConnieG999) wrote:

>Scottish Pancakes
>
>1.5 cups rolled oats (uncooked) 2 cups buttermilk
>1.5 tsp sugar 1 tbsp ("well-rounded") baking soda .5 cup flour 2 eggs
>
>Mix oats and buttermilk; let stand 5 minutes. Add remaining ingredients to mixture and blend until
>relatively smooth. Drop by spoonfuls on a hot greased griddle; cakes should be about 4 inches
>diameter. Turn when most surface bubbles begin to break, to brown the top side.

Steel cut oats would definitely need much longer soaking, at least over night, and perhaps
some cooking.

With the short soaking time, I wonder if it might need quick cooking rolled oats (as opposed to the
old fashioned oats).
 
R

Richard Periut

Guest
ConnieG999 wrote:
> [email protected] (PENMART01) writes:
>
>

>
>
> Don't get your panties in a wad, Sheldon. Here;s the recipe.
>
> Scottish Pancakes
>
> 1.5 cups rolled oats (uncooked) 2 cups buttermilk
> 1.5 tsp sugar 1 tbsp ("well-rounded") baking soda .5 cup flour 2 eggs
>
> Mix oats and buttermilk; let stand 5 minutes. Add remaining ingredients to mixture and blend until
> relatively smooth. Drop by spoonfuls on a hot greased griddle; cakes should be about 4 inches
> diameter. Turn when most surface bubbles begin to break, to brown the top side.
>
>
> Connie
> *****************************************************
> My mind is like a steel...um, whatchamacallit.
>

Whoa! You'll need to cook those pin heads very well, else you'll end up with a product, which will
be perfect for parrots.

Rich

--
---------------------------------------------------------------------

Dum spiro, spero. (Cicero) As long as I breathe, I hope.
 
D

Dave Smith

Guest
ConnieG999 wrote:

> [email protected] (PENMART01) writes:
>

>
> Don't get your panties in a wad, Sheldon. Here;s the recipe.
>
> Scottish Pancakes
>
> 1.5 cups rolled oats (uncooked) 2 cups buttermilk
> 1.5 tsp sugar 1 tbsp ("well-rounded") baking soda .5 cup flour 2 eggs
>
> Mix oats and buttermilk; let stand 5 minutes. Add remaining ingredients to mixture and blend until
> relatively smooth. Drop by spoonfuls on a hot greased griddle; cakes should be about 4 inches
> diameter. Turn when most surface bubbles begin to break, to brown the top side.
>

Nope. You'll get clumps of limp pancakes filled with grit.
 
D

Dennis G .

Guest
[email protected] (ConnieG999) wrote:

>I have a recipe that calls for uncooked rolled oats. I have a tin of McCann's steel-cut oats. I
>know what the difference in the two is, but what I don't know is, can I replace the rolled oats in
>the recipe with the steel-cut oats?
>
>Connie
>*****************************************************
>My mind is like a steel...um, whatchamacallit.

Had to search and found:

"Whole oat groats are oats that have had the hulls removed and have been heat treated to stabilize
enzymes which cause rancidity. Steel cut oat groats are whole oat groats that have each been cut
into two or four pieces. Whole oat flour can be produced in several granulations, but all are
produced by grinding whole oat products through hammermills or rollstands. Low bran oat flour is the
flour produced during the production of bran (any granulation). It is lower in protein and fibre
content than whole oat flour.

Crushed oats are produced by lightly grinding groats, steel cut, or flakes to produce a meal type
product. Various textures (fine and coarse as rough categories) are available. Large flake rolled
oats (#3, #4, #5, #6) are produced by rolled whole oat groats.

All large flake oats are essentially the same product, but produced at different thicknesses, which
results in a range of absorption characteristics, as well as visual differences.

The quick, baby, and instant rolled oats are all manufactured by rolling steel cut oat groats.
Different granulations of steel cut and different rolling thicknesses result in a variety of
related products. "

From: http://www.can-oat.com/uses/uses.html

Dennis