OCR3 Question Newbie (yes, again)

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Calvin, Jun 27, 2003.

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  1. Calvin

    Calvin Guest

    Hi Folks, So I decided to check out the cycle store on my way doing some errands. My plan was to
    wait until the fall and pick up a good deal on a road bike at the shows once I figured out my riding
    style and preferences. I do know so far that I love the drop bar riding position.

    So the salesguy tells me about the OCR3 and takes it down and I check it out. He tells me it will be
    on sale in a few days for 800$CAD.

    I checked some reviews and it seems to be a good bike but the Sora set didn't get good reviews. I
    would be interested to hear what folks think of this particular bike as an entry level. I am in no
    rush but would like to pick up a good deal if this represents one.

    Thanks for your feedback. Joanne
     
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  2. According to calvin <[email protected]>:
    >
    >So the salesguy tells me about the OCR3 and takes it down and I check it out. He tells me it will
    >be on sale in a few days for 800$CAD.
    >
    >I checked some reviews and it seems to be a good bike but the Sora set didn't get good reviews. I
    >would be interested to hear what folks think of this particular bike as an entry level. I am in no
    >rush but would like to pick up a good deal if this represents one.

    They sell here in Southern California retail for CAD$740 (USD$550).

    Lars
     
  3. Trying

    Trying Guest

    My riding partner has an OCR3 and it works great. He has had no problem with the Sora stuff. His
    only complaint (if you could call it that) is he doesn't care for the different geometry of the
    frame. He likes the more traditional style.

    But if your are looking at other bikes, I just bought a Trek 1000 for the same money as he paid and
    now he is jealous!

    Tom

    "calvin" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Hi Folks, So I decided to check out the cycle store on my way doing some errands. My plan was to
    > wait until the fall and pick up a good deal on a road bike at the shows once I figured out my
    > riding style and preferences. I do know so far that I love the drop bar riding position.
    >
    > So the salesguy tells me about the OCR3 and takes it down and I check it out. He tells me it will
    > be on sale in a few days for 800$CAD.
    >
    > I checked some reviews and it seems to be a good bike but the Sora set didn't get good reviews. I
    > would be interested to hear what folks think of this particular bike as an entry level. I am in no
    > rush but would like to pick up a good deal if this represents one.
    >
    > Thanks for your feedback. Joanne
     
  4. Nate

    Nate Guest

    [email protected] (calvin) wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > Hi Folks, So I decided to check out the cycle store on my way doing some errands. My plan was to
    > wait until the fall and pick up a good deal on a road bike at the shows once I figured out my
    > riding style and preferences. I do know so far that I love the drop bar riding position.
    >
    > So the salesguy tells me about the OCR3 and takes it down and I check it out. He tells me it will
    > be on sale in a few days for 800$CAD.
    >
    > I checked some reviews and it seems to be a good bike but the Sora set didn't get good reviews. I
    > would be interested to hear what folks think of this particular bike as an entry level. I am in no
    > rush but would like to pick up a good deal if this represents one.
    >
    > Thanks for your feedback. Joanne

    I don't have experience with the specific bike, but the big problem with Sora is it's crappy STI
    shift/brake levers, the only one in Shimano's line that has the inbound thumb switches that make
    downshifting in back and upshifting in front only really accessible while riding on the brake hoods.
    It's not a huge downfall, but is definitely enough to be annoying. As pricey as STI levers are, many
    find it worth it to move up to the Tiagra one instead. Or just get a bike with bar-end shifters,
    which have the advantage of being cheaper and not eventually breaking on a regular basis. Also,
    Giant's "4 sizes fit all because we use adjustable stems" OCR geometry is billed as a magic bullet,
    but is really just a hokey excuse to have to make fewer frame sizes. The cheaper shimano deraileurs
    tend to work very adequately as long as they're set up and the drivetrain is maintained correctly.
    The other big problem with entry level bikes is that frequently the wheels are skimped on and leave
    the shop with spokes undertensioned and not properly stress relieved. This causes them to go out of
    true quickly, which makes them hard to salvage if the problem is allowed to get bad enough before
    it's properly corrected. Shop salespeople never admit this and rarely seem to be aware of what makes
    a wheel last. The point with all this is that when buying an entry level bike, one way or another
    you have to make sure the wheels leave the shop at max tension, but this requires some research and
    knowledge on your part.

    The sale price isn't a spectacular deal by any means. Usually it's a bad idea to get whatever the
    salesperson initially wants to sell you on, given the amount of choices there are. Before you buy
    you should research womens-specific designs and why they're so advantageous, especially if you're
    shorter. Also, make sure the bike matches your intended purpose. You should make your decision
    knowing that almost all of today's production road bikes are made to emulate racing bikes, at the
    cost of many features useful for everday riding, such as comfort, appropriate gearing, ability to
    use fenders and wider tires if desired, and durability.
     
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