odd question

Discussion in 'General Fitness' started by Madelaine, Jun 12, 2004.

  1. Madelaine

    Madelaine Guest

    I have recently roughly doubled the amount of time that I
    spend exercise per day. At the same time, and for only the
    second or third time in my life, I have developed
    constipation. Has this happened to anyone else for the same
    reason? Half of my exercise is on a recumbent stationery
    bike and the other half is swimming, mostly breast stroke.
    I'm hoping this is transitory. I'm getting fiber from my
    diet, and eating quite consistently since I have diabetes
    (and I've lost 11 pounds in 11 weeks). I drink plenty of
    water. I'm hoping that once my body gets used to the
    increased exercise this will go away. I'm just looking for
    experience, I've already been to the doctor for the medical
    side of all this. Madelaine
     
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  2. Madelaine <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I have recently roughly doubled the amount of time that I
    >spend exercise per day. At the same time, and for only the
    >second or third time in my life, I have developed
    >constipation. Has this happened to anyone else for the same
    >reason? Half of my exercise is on a recumbent stationery
    >bike and the other half is swimming, mostly breast stroke.
    >I'm hoping this is transitory. I'm getting fiber from my
    >diet, and eating quite consistently since I have diabetes
    >(and I've lost 11 pounds in 11 weeks). I drink plenty of
    >water. I'm hoping that once my body gets used to the
    >increased exercise this will go away. I'm just looking for
    >experience, I've already been to the doctor for the medical
    >side of all this. Madelaine

    I've not heard of anyone developing constipation by
    increasing exercise, assuming all the other factors are
    kept in normal range, eg increased water intake, increased
    rest. I wouldn't suspect exercise as the problem, but I
    don't know.
     
  3. Go to the following search engine:

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?CMD=Search-
    &DB=pubmed

    In the search box, type:

    constipation AND exercise

    Note that the search terms are not case sensitive, but the
    AND, OR, and NOT must be all capital letters.

    You'll get 116 "hits." Click on "show" and click on the tab
    which allows you to display the maxium number you want
    (enter 200) and then re-click "Go." All 116 will be
    displayed. Most aren't helpful, but a number of them are.
    You just put a check mark ("tic") in the little box next to
    the titles of interest, then, when you have gotten to the
    bottom of the list of 116, click "Display" and choose
    "abstracts." Then click "send to" and choose "text." You can
    then peruse these for helpful information.

    Just a couple of off my head comments. Firstly, constipation
    (manifest as a CHANGE from a previously stable functional
    state) can result from diabetic neuropathy (which may be an
    overlooked possibility by doctors who are more concerned
    about ruling out cancer). (In the PubMed search engine, type
    "constipation" AND "diabetic neuropathy").

    Secondly, swimming and recumbent cycling are not the best
    forms of exercise for improving colonic motility. You've
    probably heard of the famous "runners' trots"; which is the
    sudden need to defecate during a run. Jogging is a very
    effective method to stimulate colonic motility, as can be
    attested to by anyone who has waited in lines at porta-
    potties just before the start of a 10K run (where people
    have been jogging around to warm up). Swimming isn't nearly
    as effective at doing this, and I doubt that recumbent
    cycling is, as well. So you might try drinking a cup of warm
    liquid in the morning, followed by some easy jogging (in
    addition to the other things you have tried).

    - Larry
     
  4. Brian D

    Brian D Guest

    On 9 Jun,
    Martin W. Smith <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Madelaine <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >I have recently roughly doubled the amount of time that I
    > >spend exercise per day. At the same time, and for only
    > >the second or third time in my life, I have developed
    > >constipation. Has this happened to anyone else for the
    > >same reason? Half of my exercise is on a recumbent
    > >stationery bike and the other half is swimming, mostly
    > >breast stroke. I'm hoping this is transitory. I'm getting
    > >fiber from my diet, and eating quite consistently since I
    > >have diabetes (and I've lost 11 pounds in 11 weeks). I
    > >drink plenty of water. I'm hoping that once my body gets
    > >used to the increased exercise this will go away. I'm
    > >just looking for experience, I've already been to the
    > >doctor for the medical side of all this. Madelaine
    >
    > I've not heard of anyone developing constipation by
    > increasing exercise, assuming all the other factors are
    > kept in normal range, eg increased water intake, increased
    > rest. I wouldn't suspect exercise as the problem, but I
    > don't know.
    >
    Check out your water intake is adequate for the
    increased exercise.

    --
    BD change lycos to yahoo to reply
     
  5. Madelaine

    Madelaine Guest

    Larry, Thanks for the link--I'll investigate this and then
    get back with my pcp. Neuropathy is pretty unlikely since I
    was diagnosed in March at practically the minute I crossed
    over from pre-diabetes to Type II, although my brother's
    case of Type II diabetes was diagnosed via neuropathy in his
    feet, so perhaps my family has weird sugar-sensitive nerves.
    I had thought about the fact that neither recumbent biking
    nor swimming were very good at stimulating the colon. I used
    to walk for exercise, but metatarsus adductus (or metatarsus
    varus or skew foot) has given me moderate to severe
    arthritis of the foot. Jogging is out. I'll try using my
    lateral stepper more.

    Thanks again, Madelaine

    Larry Weisenthal wrote:

    > Go to the following search engine:
    >
    > http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?CMD=Search&-
    > DB=pubmed
    >
    > In the search box, type:
    >
    > constipation AND exercise
    >
    > Note that the search terms are not case sensitive, but the
    > AND, OR, and NOT must be all capital letters.
    >
    > You'll get 116 "hits." Click on "show" and click on the
    > tab which allows you to display the maxium number you want
    > (enter 200) and then re-click "Go." All 116 will be
    > displayed. Most aren't helpful, but a number of them are.
    > You just put a check mark ("tic") in the little box next
    > to the titles of interest, then, when you have gotten to
    > the bottom of the list of 116, click "Display" and choose
    > "abstracts." Then click "send to" and choose "text." You
    > can then peruse these for helpful information.
    >
    > Just a couple of off my head comments. Firstly,
    > constipation (manifest as a CHANGE from a previously
    > stable functional state) can result from diabetic
    > neuropathy (which may be an overlooked possibility by
    > doctors who are more concerned about ruling out cancer).
    > (In the PubMed search engine, type "constipation" AND
    > "diabetic neuropathy").
    >
    > Secondly, swimming and recumbent cycling are not the best
    > forms of exercise for improving colonic motility. You've
    > probably heard of the famous "runners' trots"; which is
    > the sudden need to defecate during a run. Jogging is a
    > very effective method to stimulate colonic motility, as
    > can be attested to by anyone who has waited in lines at
    > porta-potties just before the start of a 10K run (where
    > people have been jogging around to warm up). Swimming
    > isn't nearly as effective at doing this, and I doubt that
    > recumbent cycling is, as well. So you might try drinking a
    > cup of warm liquid in the morning, followed by some easy
    > jogging (in addition to the other things you have tried).
    >
    > - Larry
     
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