Off the Peg or Custom Build?



Charles1

New Member
Aug 3, 2004
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Dear all,


My lovely Cannondale R400 has just been stolen :mad:. So I need to get a new bike. I use the bike for commuting (ten miles per day) and although I like to pretend that I’m in the Tour de France when I’m going along, I don’t actually do any racing. I have always bought off the peg before so I am just wondering whether to do the same again or go for custom build. I want to spend about 550 UKP. I have read on this forum that the frame is maybe the most important part of the bike – I’m not sure why – is it that the frame should be light? But because I’m not racing I’m not bothered if the frame is slightly heavier. If I got a custom build bike I could maybe put less money into the frame and more into other parts of the bike. In my experience one thing that is important is to have strong wheels ie that stay true. I guess my main concern is for the bike to be reliable = to stay on the road.

Then there are things like chrome forks – do I need them? So here are four bikes that I am looking at for around 550 UKP. Should I go for one of these or custom build?

thanx



Charles



Scott AFD Expert

http://www.scottusa.com/product.php?UID=4854

2004 model.
Superlight, handcrafted Scott Alloy frame with custom drawn double butted 7005 alloy tubes and polished welded seams to increase strength.

Compact geometry with sloping top tube to increase stiffness by reducing weight.

Aero dynamic integrated headset system.

Shimano Sora groupset with triple chainwheel, 24 speed and Dual Control shifting system.

Scott Comp wheelset with stainless spokes and selected top-line components.

Fork: Scott Alloy 11/8" Alloy steerer integreated








  • Cassette: Shimano CS-HG50-8 12-25 T
  • Rear der: Shimano Sora
  • Front Der: Shimano Sora
  • Shifters: Shimano Sora Dual control 24 speed
  • Brakes: Scott AFD Pro high polish silver Catridge Pads
  • Crankset: Suntour Comp 30x42x52
  • Handlebar: Scott "Drop" Anatomic
  • Stem: Scott AFD Comp 1-1/8"/Double Bolt
  • Seatpost: Scott AFD Comp 31.2 mm
  • Seat: Scott Road
  • Hubs: Scott Comp wheelset
  • Spokes: 14 G Stainless, silver 2 mm
  • Rims: Alex-Scott/DA-22 Double wall/Black 32/32
  • Tires: DENDA Koncept K-191 700x23 C


GT 2004 ZR3.0

http://www.gtbicycles.com/pavement/catalog/detail.php?id=227


Frame: ZR-Pro Road Butted 7000 aluminum alloy Integrated H-tube
Fork: GT Carbon Fiber Integrated Design 1 1/8" threadless carbon steerer
Crankset: TruVativ Elita ISIS 52/42/30
Bottom Bracket: Tange Seiki LN-28 sealed
Pedals: Ritchy Logic Road
Front Derailleur: Shimano Tiagra
Rear Derailleur: Shimano Tiagra
Shifters: Shimano Tiagra STI 27 spd
Freewheel: Shimano HG-50 9spd 13-25
Chain: Shimano HG-53 9spd
Rims: Ritchey Aero Pro
Tires: Continental Sport 1000 23c
Front Hub: Shimano
Rear Hub: Shimano
Spokes: 14g stainless steel
Nipples: Brass CP
Front Brake: ProMax Dual Pivot
Rear Brake: ProMax Dual Pivot
Brake Levers: Shimano Tiagra STI
Handlebar: Ritchey BioMax
Stem: Ritchey Pro
Grips: Black Cork
Headset: TH integrated
Saddle: Fizik Dolomiti
Seat Post: GT aluminum alloy




Claud Butler - Milano

http://www.falconcycles.co.uk/product.php?c.id=3&s.id=1&p.id=350

Brake Levers: Shimano
Brakes: Alloy Tektro dual pivot design
Chain:
Chainset: Campagnol Xenon Alloy
Fork / Colour: Carbon fibre aero profile
Frame / Colour: Aero profile 7005
Freewheel:
Gear Levers: Xenon
Gears Front:
Gears Rear: Campagnola speed
Handlebars: ITM racing
Headset:
Hub Front / Rear: QR
Model Number: 4992
Pedals:
Rims: Deep section QR
Saddle: Selle Bassano Excaliber
Seat Clamp: Alloy
Seat Pillar / Bolt: Alloy Micro adjust
Stem: Alloy hi rise
Tube:
Tyres: Town and trail
Wheels / Spokes: Vuelta XRP aero profile



FUJI FINEST AL


For some reason the spec won't copy and comes out as gobbledegook


http://www.fujibikes.com/road
 

ItalianStallion

New Member
Mar 3, 2004
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First off, stay away from Claud Butlers.

The nice thing about an off the shelf bike is its guarantee. Giant I think has a lifetime guarantee. Not bad.....


On the other hand, custom builds have the advantage of being a little cheaper and you can get exactly what you want on it. Also, if you get a custom frame you can get it to an exact geometry.... but I don't think you're too bored about that.

Of the 3, I'd got for the Scott. But have you considered other brands? For £550 you can get a Giant OCR1, a Trek 1200 (good bike), just to say the most common ones. And, as I said, those two brands offer good customer service and guarantee. Also, they're pretty common to find.
 

Charles1

New Member
Aug 3, 2004
8
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ItalianStallion said:
But have you considered other brands?
Thanx - I am open to suggestions. I guess my first decision is off the peg or custom build and I guess that to play it safe I am leaning to off the peg.
 

MeesterBond

New Member
Jul 5, 2004
20
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ItalianStallion said:
First off, stay away from Claud Butlers.

The nice thing about an off the shelf bike is its guarantee. Giant I think has a lifetime guarantee. Not bad.....


On the other hand, custom builds have the advantage of being a little cheaper and you can get exactly what you want on it. Also, if you get a custom frame you can get it to an exact geometry.... but I don't think you're too bored about that.

Of the 3, I'd got for the Scott. But have you considered other brands? For £550 you can get a Giant OCR1, a Trek 1200 (good bike), just to say the most common ones. And, as I said, those two brands offer good customer service and guarantee. Also, they're pretty common to find.
I think you'll struggle to get a custom built frame for £550, let alone a whole bike.. The 'off the peg' solution is certainly going to be better value for money, particularly if 'normal' sizes fit.

Another couple of suggestions though - Edinburgh Bicycle Co-operative produce some very good value bikes at that sort of price. In addition, C+ keep going on about Guess bikes, again around that price point.
 

boudreaux

New Member
Oct 16, 2003
5,133
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ItalianStallion said:
First off, stay away from Claud Butlers.

The nice thing about an off the shelf bike is its guarantee. Giant I think has a lifetime guarantee. Not bad.....


On the other hand, custom builds have the advantage of being a little cheaper and you can get exactly what you want on it. Also, if you get a custom frame you can get it to an exact geometry.... but I don't think you're too bored about that.

Of the 3, I'd got for the Scott. But have you considered other brands? For £550 you can get a Giant OCR1, a Trek 1200 (good bike), just to say the most common ones. And, as I said, those two brands offer good customer service and guarantee. Also, they're pretty common to find.
A custom frame will have a warranty.Giant frames are not lifetime, and custom is not cheaper.
 

ItalianStallion

New Member
Mar 3, 2004
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boudreaux said:
A custom frame will have a warranty.Giant frames are not lifetime, and custom is not cheaper.
My mistake. It's Trek that has lifetime guarantee, as it has been pointed out to me.

Boudreaux, in the UK, it is cheaper to buy a frame and put specific components on it, rather than buying the same frame+component as off the shelf. For how funny it sounds, it is true. In some cases (high end bikes) you can save a lot of money by mailordering the individual bits and paying the mechanic to put it together.
 

ItalianStallion

New Member
Mar 3, 2004
89
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MeesterBond said:
I think you'll struggle to get a custom built frame for £550, let alone a whole bike.. The 'off the peg' solution is certainly going to be better value for money, particularly if 'normal' sizes fit.

Another couple of suggestions though - Edinburgh Bicycle Co-operative produce some very good value bikes at that sort of price. In addition, C+ keep going on about Guess bikes, again around that price point.
Check out www.ribblecycles.co.uk

You can get a custom build bike from around £485 with Shimano Sora, £495 with Campag Xenon and £530 with Tiagra. And you can choose pretty much anything you want to change....
 

boudreaux

New Member
Oct 16, 2003
5,133
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ItalianStallion said:
Boudreaux, in the UK, it is cheaper to buy a frame and put specific components on it, rather than buying the same frame+component as off the shelf. For how funny it sounds, it is true. In some cases (high end bikes) you can save a lot of money by mailordering the individual bits and paying the mechanic to put it together.
That does not necessarily translate to a custom built FRAME and all associated parts being cheaper.
 

ItalianStallion

New Member
Mar 3, 2004
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boudreaux said:
That does not necessarily translate to a custom built FRAME and all associated parts being cheaper.
Sorry, I didn't mean custom built frame.

In the UK, because of the lack of good custom frame builders, we refer to a custom bike as being an assembled. Well, at least my LBS and I do! :)
 

Charles1

New Member
Aug 3, 2004
8
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Thanx to all for replies. Suppose I do go for custom build, the idea would be to save on the frame and maybe forks and get better wheels and maybe groupset. The reason for this is cos as I said I'm not racing so I don't mind if the frame is a bit heavier. Is my logic ok here or does this sound like a bad idea? I don't need the frame to last a lifetime, 5 years will be fine. And when I say custom frame I don't mean made to measure I just mean that I pick a frame in the shop and they build the components onto that.
 

foilist2000

New Member
Aug 22, 2003
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Build it yourself, I built the bike below from parts bought from 4 different websites for about £550 all in. You just have to shop around and take advantage of special offers. Bike is 105 equiped throughout and has a carbon fork. ( Yes I know the rear tyre is missing.) If you cant be bothered with this, try a Giant OCR, they are good value for the money