Oh quit yer crying (carbon)

Discussion in 'Clydesdales 200lb / 90kg + riders' started by Mr. Beanz, Sep 21, 2020.

  1. Mr. Beanz

    Mr. Beanz Well-Known Member

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    So I had an aluminum Lemond Tourmalet. Cracked, ripped, got destroyed after 13,000 miles (3 years). Trek easy peasy replacement transaction.

    Trek upgraded to a partial alum/carbon mix Lemond Chambery. Best riding bike I have ever had in my 30 years of cycling. Lots of climbing at 230-260 pounds on both these bikes over the years. Also snapped at the alum section at the rear dropout section. Bummer, again, smoothest sweetest ride I've had in any material. Got another 3 years and another just over 13,000 miles.

    Worried 13,000 might be my limit.

    Then Trek offered to replace the frame once again. I told them I was a big guy and my failures on the last 2 frames. So I asked for an honest response telling them I do fast downhills on big climbs as well and I surely don't want to break my face if their frames are actually designed for riders much smaller than I. I told them with an honest opinion, I would sell my replacement frame and invest in something much more durable for my style and size.

    So they answered saying that their bikes were totally safe for a big guy like me but that they had already decided to upgrade my replacement once again to a full carbon Madone 4.7 frame and beefy fork. I don't know if they were trying the CYA method or if they were totally honest and upgraded to carbon anyway, I'm not sure, just happy that they did.

    So I did the component swap myself, not rocket science and the local LBS wanted $220 to do it! Pfft, $30 in tools and I was good! Did it myself.

    Anyway, here I am few years later and it has almost 16,000 miles on it and not one issue. So seeing a ton of threads by Clydesdales crying that carbon is going to explode under their big bodies ($210+), I can honestly say, OH QUIT YER CRYING!! It ain't going to explode! ;)

    Of course I have been 270 tops so I will not speak on behalf of the 300+ club.:cool:

    I am at 260 right now so most my carbon miles have been around this weight over the last few year.

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  2. Germanrazor

    Germanrazor Active Member

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    Carbon is a tough material for sure. I too when I was around 220 lbs. worried going from aluminum to carbon. After I did, my fears were put to rest. Now that in my last three months I have taken a direct effort to lose weight, from 207 to 186, I can really feel comfortable...LOL

    You are right, carbon cryers dry those tears and know that it will support most riders in the 200+ club. I do think I read somewhere on my Madone carbon frame the weight limit was maybe 260 or 270???? I will have to look again to see. Then again, maybe that was another component on the bike????
     
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  3. jhuskey

    jhuskey Moderator

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    Steel is real. So is carbon, it just doesn't rhyme with steel.
     
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  4. Mr. Beanz

    Mr. Beanz Well-Known Member

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    I asked a Trek rep at warranty time, they told me 270
     
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  5. Mr. Beanz

    Mr. Beanz Well-Known Member

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    :D:p:D
     
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