Oh the lobster of it all

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Dog3, Mar 1, 2004.

  1. Dog3

    Dog3 Guest

    Gawd! And just after the thread about killing the lobster ;(

    Michael <- making up a batch of devil's brownies to take with when sentenced

    Italy Town Sets Down Pet-Pampering Laws Mon Mar 1,10:17 AM ET

    ROME (Reuters) - Pet owners in a central Italian town must pamper their dogs, cats and birds and
    even show mercy to supper-time lobsters or face fines as high as 500 euros.

    According to a new bill regulating the treatment of animals that will be implemented next week in
    the wealthy town of Reggio Emilia, canary owners will have to buy a significant other for their
    bird, who otherwise might suffer from loneliness.

    Dog owners will have to provide sufficiently spacious dog houses in shady, sheltered locations and
    pet owners of all stripes will be prohibited from dyeing the fur of their animals.

    The rules, spelled out in 39 different articles, also make it illegal to throw live lobsters in
    boiling water.

    "It's a useless torture, they should be killed first," a spokeswoman for the town said on Saturday.

    Fines for breaking the rules run from 25 to 495 euros.

    --
    Deathbed statement...

    "Codeine . . . bourbon." ~~Tallulah Bankhead, actress, d. December 12, 1968
     
    Tags:


  2. Jmcquown

    Jmcquown Guest

    Dog3 wrote:
    > Gawd! And just after the thread about killing the lobster ;(
    >
    > Michael <- making up a batch of devil's brownies to take with when sentenced

    Er, since when are Lobsters considered "pets"?

    Jill (will join Michael in jail after we sit down to Lobster bisque)

    > Italy Town Sets Down Pet-Pampering Laws Mon Mar 1,10:17 AM ET
    >
    > ROME (Reuters) - Pet owners in a central Italian town must pamper their dogs, cats and birds and
    > even show mercy to supper-time lobsters or face fines as high as 500 euros.
    >
    > According to a new bill regulating the treatment of animals that will be implemented next week in
    > the wealthy town of Reggio Emilia, canary owners will have to buy a significant other for their
    > bird, who otherwise might suffer from loneliness.
    >
    > Dog owners will have to provide sufficiently spacious dog houses in shady, sheltered locations and
    > pet owners of all stripes will be prohibited from dyeing the fur of their animals.
    >
    > The rules, spelled out in 39 different articles, also make it illegal to throw live lobsters in
    > boiling water.
    >
    > "It's a useless torture, they should be killed first," a spokeswoman for the town said on
    > Saturday.
    >
    > Fines for breaking the rules run from 25 to 495 euros.
     
  3. Pennyaline

    Pennyaline Guest

    "Dog3" wrote:

    <snip>

    > The rules, spelled out in 39 different articles, also make it illegal to throw live lobsters in
    > boiling water.
    >
    > "It's a useless torture, they should be killed first," a spokeswoman for the town said on
    > Saturday.

    Howsabout throwing them into a pot of cold water, then heating it up? Would that be better, Mrs.
    Spokesperson?

    <'cuz God knows we need more useful torture, right?
     
  4. Kenneth

    Kenneth Guest

    On Mon, 1 Mar 2004 18:17:24 -0700, "Pennyaline"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Howsabout throwing them into a pot of cold water, then heating it up? Would that be better

    In a word, "yes." According to a scientist I knew who studies these critters, their nervous system
    is such that they "zone out" (please forgive my lack of proper terminology) in such circumstances
    and thus this is much more humane... They also taste better.

    All the best,

    --
    Kenneth

    If you email... Please remove the "SPAMLESS."
     
  5. Pennyaline

    Pennyaline Guest

    "Nancree" wrote:
    > Oh, to be a Lobster Psychiatrist !

    Or a Lobster Neurologist. That's the life! How much would I have to charge per lobster to
    make a living?

    <man, watch that overhead!
     
  6. Steve Wertz

    Steve Wertz Guest

    On Mon, 01 Mar 2004 20:40:05 -0500, Kenneth
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On Mon, 1 Mar 2004 18:17:24 -0700, "Pennyaline"
    ><[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>Howsabout throwing them into a pot of cold water, then heating it up? Would that be better
    >
    >In a word, "yes." According to a scientist I knew who studies these critters, their nervous system
    >is such that they "zone out" (please forgive my lack of proper terminology) in such circumstances
    >and thus this is much more humane... They also taste better.

    It would be harder to time when they're done as all stoves heat up water at a different rate. I
    suspect that they'd be done before the water even boils.

    -sw
     
  7. On Mon, 01 Mar 2004 20:40:05 -0500, Kenneth
    <[email protected]> arranged random neurons, so they
    looked like this:

    >On Mon, 1 Mar 2004 18:17:24 -0700, "Pennyaline"
    ><[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>Howsabout throwing them into a pot of cold water, then heating it up? Would that be better
    >
    >In a word, "yes." According to a scientist I knew who studies these critters, their nervous system
    >is such that they "zone out" (please forgive my lack of proper terminology) in such circumstances
    >and thus this is much more humane... They also taste better.

    According to the New Zealand Food Safety Authority:

    http://www.maf.govt.nz/mafnet/press/archive/2000/140200lob.htm

    Throwing them into a pot of freshwater will drown them: "Drowning can cause the lobster meat to turn
    soft due to it retaining water as part of the osmotic affect. Regardless of water temperature,
    drowning is an inappropriate killing method for lobsters"

    It goes on to say:

    "The report recommends chilling a lobster [to 4°C and 40°F) before splitting it along its length
    where it has two chains of nerve ganglia, with interconnecting nerves along its body under the
    shell. Chilling beforehand prevents the lobster from moving and mistakes during splitting occurring,
    otherwise the manoeuvre requires skill to ensure a humane kill in an unchilled animal. A lobster
    should also be well chilled before head spiking.

    "The report says that tailing and chest spiking do not cause immediate unconsciousness in unchilled
    lobsters."

    It does not tell me whereinhell the "two chains of nerve ganglia, with interconnecting nerves"
    ARE. And I understand the term, "head spiking," but eggsackly *where* is the spike to be
    hammered? Anyone?

    I always figured lobsters were just seagoing spiders. *Tasty* seagoing spiders, but one less source
    for PETA's attention (the article does refer to lobsters as being " classified as animals, and
    accordingly, it is now an offence to kill a lobster inhumanely").

    Terry "Squeaks" Pulliam Burd AAC(F)BV66.0748.CA

    "If the soup had been as hot as the claret, if the claret had been as old as the bird, and if the
    bird's breasts had been as full as the waitress', it would have been a very good dinner." Anonymous.

    To reply, remove replace "shcox" with "cox"
     
  8. On Mon, 01 Mar 2004 20:40:05 -0500, Kenneth
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On Mon, 1 Mar 2004 18:17:24 -0700, "Pennyaline"
    ><[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>Howsabout throwing them into a pot of cold water, then heating it up? Would that be better
    >
    >In a word, "yes." According to a scientist I knew who studies these critters, their nervous system
    >is such that they "zone out" (please forgive my lack of proper terminology) in such circumstances
    >and thus this is much more humane... They also taste better.
    >
    They "zone out" if you just hold them in the rising steam for a moment as well. A lot less trouble.

    Since we cook lobsters on a boat, we don't boil enough water to immerse them anyway; just
    steam them.

    Rodney Myrvaagnes NYC J36 Gjo/a

    "Happy is he that taketh thy little ones and dasheth them upon the stones." __Psalm 137
     
  9. T E

    T E Guest

    From: [email protected];not (Dog3) Gawd! And just after the thread about killing the lobster ;(
    Michael <- making up a batch of devil's brownies to take with when sentenced Italy Town Sets Down
    Pet-Pampering Laws Mon Mar 1,10:17 AM ET ROME (Reuters) - Pet owners in a central Italian town must
    pamper their dogs, cats and birds and even show mercy to supper-time lobsters or face fines as high
    as 500 euros. According to a new bill regulating the treatment of animals that will be implemented
    next week in the wealthy town of Reggio Emilia, canary owners will have to buy a significant other
    for their bird, who otherwise might suffer from loneliness. Dog owners will have to provide
    sufficiently spacious dog houses in shady, sheltered locations and pet owners of all stripes will be
    prohibited from dyeing the fur of their animals. The rules, spelled out in 39 different articles,
    also make it illegal to throw live lobsters in boiling water. "It's a useless torture, they should
    be killed first," a spokeswoman for the town said on Saturday. Fines for breaking the rules run from
    25 to 495 euros.
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    --------------------------
    Feeling very proud to be half Italian after reading this.I would like to shake their hands.
     
  10. Katra

    Katra Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Steve Wertz <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On Mon, 01 Mar 2004 20:40:05 -0500, Kenneth <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >On Mon, 1 Mar 2004 18:17:24 -0700, "Pennyaline"
    > ><[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > >>Howsabout throwing them into a pot of cold water, then heating it up? Would that be better
    > >
    > >In a word, "yes." According to a scientist I knew who studies these critters, their nervous
    > >system is such that they "zone out" (please forgive my lack of proper terminology) in such
    > >circumstances and thus this is much more humane... They also taste better.
    >
    > It would be harder to time when they're done as all stoves heat up water at a different rate. I
    > suspect that they'd be done before the water even boils.
    >
    > -sw

    I've cooked them this way all my life, live crabs, same way. :) We just ran a thread about this a
    coupla weeks ago. I adore sea bugs and I, and many others, feel that tossing any living creature
    (exotherms or otherwise) is just, well, 'rong.

    When they turn bright red, they are done......

    Different sizes of bugs cook at different rates anyway, but generally they are done when the water
    actually boils.

    K.

    --
    Sprout the Mung Bean to reply...

    >,,<Cat's Haven Hobby Farm>,,<Katra at centurytel dot net>,,<
    http://cgi6.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewSellersOtherItems&include=0&userid=katra
     
  11. Katra

    Katra Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Katra <[email protected]> wrote:

    > In article <[email protected]>, Steve Wertz <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > On Mon, 01 Mar 2004 20:40:05 -0500, Kenneth <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > > >On Mon, 1 Mar 2004 18:17:24 -0700, "Pennyaline"
    > > ><[email protected]> wrote:
    > > >
    > > >>Howsabout throwing them into a pot of cold water, then heating it up? Would that be better
    > > >
    > > >In a word, "yes." According to a scientist I knew who studies these critters, their nervous
    > > >system is such that they "zone out" (please forgive my lack of proper terminology) in such
    > > >circumstances and thus this is much more humane... They also taste better.
    > >
    > > It would be harder to time when they're done as all stoves heat up water at a different rate. I
    > > suspect that they'd be done before the water even boils.
    > >
    > > -sw
    >
    > I've cooked them this way all my life, live crabs, same way. :) We just ran a thread about this a
    > coupla weeks ago. I adore sea bugs and I, and many others, feel that tossing any living creature
    > (exotherms or otherwise) is just, well, 'rong.

    Damn. That should have read "tossing any living creature (exotherms or otherwise) into boiling water
    is just, well, 'rong."

    Oops.

    >
    > When they turn bright red, they are done......
    >
    > Different sizes of bugs cook at different rates anyway, but generally they are done when the water
    > actually boils.
    >
    > K.

    --
    Sprout the Mung Bean to reply...

    >,,<Cat's Haven Hobby Farm>,,<Katra at centurytel dot net>,,<
    http://cgi6.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewSellersOtherItems&include=0&userid=katra
     
  12. Steve Wertz

    Steve Wertz Guest

    On Tue, 02 Mar 2004 01:21:45 -0600, Katra
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >When they turn bright red, they are done......

    Not necessarily. The bigger the bug, the less likely this to be true. The shell can cook in a few
    seconds (and turn red) but the insides will still be raw.

    Especially the Dungies that we west-coasters get.

    -sw
     
  13. Katra

    Katra Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Steve Wertz <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On Tue, 02 Mar 2004 01:21:45 -0600, Katra <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >When they turn bright red, they are done......
    >
    > Not necessarily. The bigger the bug, the less likely this to be true. The shell can cook in a few
    > seconds (and turn red) but the insides will still be raw.
    >
    > Especially the Dungies that we west-coasters get.
    >
    > -sw

    True... :) Dungeness is my second favorite bug next to King crab. I don't generally bother with
    blues anymore. They are just not worth the effort.

    I think a better way is to say, when the water boils, they are usually done. I'd rather slightly
    undercook and have to nuke than overcook and ruin it. :p

    K.

    --
    Sprout the Mung Bean to reply...

    >,,<Cat's Haven Hobby Farm>,,<Katra at centurytel dot net>,,<
    http://cgi6.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewSellersOtherItems&include=0&userid=katra
     
  14. Mark Shaw

    Mark Shaw Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Kenneth <[email protected]> wrote:
    >On Mon, 1 Mar 2004 18:17:24 -0700, "Pennyaline"
    ><[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>Howsabout throwing them into a pot of cold water, then heating it up? Would that be better
    >
    >In a word, "yes." According to a scientist I knew who studies these critters, their nervous system
    >is such that they "zone out" (please forgive my lack of proper terminology) in such circumstances
    >and thus this is much more humane... They also taste better.

    According to <remove_hat> Alton, <replace_hat> if you put them in the freezer for about 15 minutes
    they go right to sleep. Then, when you take them quickly from freezer to boiling pot (or, better,
    steaming pot), they just never wake up.

    Me, I think their primitive nervous systems aren't up to the task of feeling a whole heck of a lot
    of pain anyway. But I do the freezer thing, as a concession to uncertainty.

    --
    Mark Shaw contact info at homepage --> http://www.panix.com/~mshaw
    ========================================================================
    "How can any culture that has more lawyers than butchers call itself a civilization?" - Alton Brown
     
  15. Blake Murphy

    Blake Murphy Guest

    On Tue, 02 Mar 2004 01:21:45 -0600, Katra
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >In article <[email protected]>, Steve Wertz
    ><[email protected]> wrote:
    >> It would be harder to time when they're done as all
    >> stoves heat up water at a different rate. I suspect that
    >> they'd be done before the water even boils.
    >>
    >> -sw
    >
    >I've cooked them this way all my life, live crabs, same
    >way. :) We just ran a thread about this a coupla weeks
    >ago. I adore sea bugs and I, and many others, feel that
    >tossing any living creature (exotherms or otherwise) is
    >just, well, 'rong.
    >
    >When they turn bright red, they are done......
    >
    >Different sizes of bugs cook at different rates anyway, but
    >generally they are done when the water actually boils.
    >
    >K.

    you should be steaming them anyway.

    your pal, blake
     
  16. Jimlane

    Jimlane Guest

    blake murphy wrote:
    > On Tue, 02 Mar 2004 01:21:45 -0600, Katra
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >
    >>In article <[email protected]>, Steve Wertz
    >><[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>>It would be harder to time when they're done as all
    >>>stoves heat up water at a different rate. I suspect that
    >>>they'd be done before the water even boils.
    >>>
    >>>-sw
    >>
    >>I've cooked them this way all my life, live crabs, same
    >>way. :) We just ran a thread about this a coupla weeks
    >>ago. I adore sea bugs and I, and many others, feel that
    >>tossing any living creature (exotherms or otherwise) is
    >>just, well, 'rong.
    >>
    >>When they turn bright red, they are done......
    >>
    >>Different sizes of bugs cook at different rates anyway,
    >>but generally they are done when the water actually boils.
    >>
    >>K.
    >
    >
    > you should be steaming them anyway.
    >
    > your pal, blake

    Myoptic I see.

    jim
     
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