oil versus lotion

Discussion in 'Health and medical' started by John Smith, Mar 5, 2004.

  1. John Smith

    John Smith Guest

    First, you need more traffic in this newsgroup. It's a great newsgroup. You should get the word out
    to your colleagues. You all have a lot to share with each other.

    Now, what are the pro's and con's of oil versus lotion for the massage?

    I'll ask my therapist the next time I can afford to see her, but in the meantime, I'm dying to know.

    She did make one comment that I remember, lotion kind of soaks in, but oil will stay around and get
    on the clients clothes. I'm not sure if I heard her correctly. I wasn't trying to remember details
    of our conversation.

    thanks,

    JS
     
    Tags:


  2. Tiffany

    Tiffany Guest

    Yes, more traffic would be cool. But we are a busy bunch too! :)

    I use a basic lotion for most my work, because it will
    absorb better. I do however tend to use a oil blend on the
    back as it doesn't absorb as quickly and I can work the back
    for some time without reapplying oil/lotion. Some therapists
    LOVE to use oil from head to toe. I did find one oil blend
    that wasn't greasy and didn't seem to hang out side the skin
    too long. Most will though. I use the oils for some types of
    massage's though and if it is what a client likes best. Some
    therapists use a 'gel' type lotion. I personally hate those.
    They feel thick and slimy to me. When I go for a massage, if
    I see that slimy crap sitting there, I ask if they have
    something else to use.

    I suppose there is no easy answer, as it depends on what the
    therapist likes and what type of work is being done.

    Tiffany John Smith <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > First, you need more traffic in this newsgroup. It's a
    > great newsgroup. You should get the word out to your
    > colleagues. You all have a lot to share with each other.
    >
    > Now, what are the pro's and con's of oil versus lotion for
    > the massage?
    >
    > I'll ask my therapist the next time I can afford to see
    > her, but in the meantime, I'm dying to know.
    >
    > She did make one comment that I remember, lotion kind of
    > soaks in, but oil will stay around and get on the clients
    > clothes. I'm not sure if I heard her correctly. I wasn't
    > trying to remember details of our conversation.
    >
    > thanks,
    >
    > JS
     
  3. Suzee

    Suzee Guest

    John Smith wrote:
    >
    > First, you need more traffic in this newsgroup. It's a
    > great newsgroup. You should get the word out to your
    > colleagues. You all have a lot to share with each other.
    >
    > Now, what are the pro's and con's of oil versus lotion for
    > the massage?
    >
    > I'll ask my therapist the next time I can afford to see
    > her, but in the meantime, I'm dying to know.
    >
    > She did make one comment that I remember, lotion kind of
    > soaks in, but oil will stay around and get on the clients
    > clothes. I'm not sure if I heard her correctly. I wasn't
    > trying to remember details of our conversation.

    I've used massage lotion before and don't care for it; it
    does soak in - kind of `dry up'. I don't find most oils,
    especially water dispersable, to be to greasy. What I like
    to use is cream/creme - it starts out kinda slick for warm
    up gliding, then soaks in just enough to allow for deeper
    work where you don't need it to be slick. Doesn't seem to
    get on clothing much either, unless you use lots.

    sue
     
  4. L Kelly

    L Kelly Guest

    I use extra virgin olive oil and cold pressed peanut oil as
    a base for most of my oils because they are absorbed well
    and are most therapeutic for skin and muscles. Can add
    essential oils, herbs or camphor, etc., according to
    patient's needs.

    Most lotions have ingredients that a chemistry course is
    needed to understand but I use lotion when patient prefers.

    Sometimes I use no medium, sometimes work with patient fully
    clothed, again, according to patient's needs.

    LK

    http://www.icdc.com/~drkelly/chiropractorphiladelphia803.htm
     
  5. I train couples in how to do safe and effective massage for
    fibromyalgia. Since it needs to be done at home in routine
    surroundings, (daily would be nice) an 'oil massage' isn't
    going to happen often. Especially since we may spend 45
    minutes on just one area. I have some people that I've
    directed to Wal-Mart for slick polyester outfits, and they
    just put them on over whatever they're wearing. Works
    especially well for one whose blood pressure is already low,
    and chills very easily when she relaxes. She has made me a
    few 'gloves' out of sleeve portions, and they make for even
    less resistance.

    L Kelly, DC <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I use extra virgin olive oil and cold pressed peanut oil
    > as a base for
    most
    > of my oils because they are absorbed well and are most
    > therapeutic for
    skin
    > and muscles. Can add essential oils, herbs or camphor,
    > etc., according to patient's needs.
    >
    > Most lotions have ingredients that a chemistry course is
    > needed to understand but I use lotion when patient
    > prefers.
    >
    > Sometimes I use no medium, sometimes work with patient
    > fully clothed,
    again,
    > according to patient's needs.
    >
    > LK
    >
    > http://www.icdc.com/~drkelly/chiropractorphiladelphi-
    > a803.htm
     
  6. L Kelly

    L Kelly Guest

    <I have some people that I've directed to Wal-Mart for
    slick polyester
    outfits>

    Good idea. I sometimes put a cotton/polyester sheet over
    clothing for massage. LK
     
Loading...