Ok another question

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Zilla, May 5, 2006.

  1. Zilla

    Zilla Guest

    Thanks to all I have the 37-597 tires on my
    Schwinn now. However I noticed on the rear
    wheel, a portion of the tire gets "oblonged"
    when properly inflated. I take the tire and
    tube off, put the wheel on a truing stand, and
    the wheel itself is "pretty true". So this means
    it's NOT the wheel. I put back the tube/tire
    back on, inflate, and I get the same "non-
    roundness" on the tire. I see the tire fluctuate
    to 1/4"-3/8" from roundness when observing
    it with a guide. It's almost as if the tire "goes
    further" in this part of the wheel". This is near
    the valve.

    To explain it a different way, if one looks at
    the wheel and tire as 2 concentric circles, with
    the wheel being the inner circle, one would
    expect the their two circumferences to be
    equidistant throughout, correct? Well in my
    case, the outter circle goes "non-uniform"
    in one part; hence the circumferences are
    non-equidistant in that part.

    --
    - Zilla
    Cary, NC USA
    (Remove XSPAM)
     
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  2. peter

    peter Guest

    Zilla wrote:
    > Thanks to all I have the 37-597 tires on my
    > Schwinn now. However I noticed on the rear
    > wheel, a portion of the tire gets "oblonged"
    > when properly inflated.


    You mention that the problem area is near the valve which makes me
    suspect that perhaps that portion of the tube is getting pinched under
    the bead of the tire. That prevents the bead from seating properly in
    the rim and therefore results in the tire sitting out farther in that
    area.

    Before inflating the tube you should push in on the valve to make sure
    that it freely goes into the interior of the tire and isn't being hung
    up under the bead.
     
  3. JeffWills

    JeffWills Guest

    peter wrote:
    > Zilla wrote:
    > > Thanks to all I have the 37-597 tires on my
    > > Schwinn now. However I noticed on the rear
    > > wheel, a portion of the tire gets "oblonged"
    > > when properly inflated.

    >
    > You mention that the problem area is near the valve which makes me
    > suspect that perhaps that portion of the tube is getting pinched under
    > the bead of the tire. That prevents the bead from seating properly in
    > the rim and therefore results in the tire sitting out farther in that
    > area.
    >
    > Before inflating the tube you should push in on the valve to make sure
    > that it freely goes into the interior of the tire and isn't being hung
    > up under the bead.


    Peter's description is pretty close.

    IIRC, getting tires to seat properly on the old S-6 rims was pretty
    easy with Schwinn-brand tires but a hit-or-miss proposition with
    off-brand tires. There's a couple hints for correcting this at
    http://www.bikewebsite.com/bike-tiretube.htm

    Jeff
     
  4. landotter

    landotter Guest

    Seating may very well be the issue, but keep in mind, that sometimes
    you can get amazingly crap tires, especially those "vintage" sizes.
    I've run into a couple situations, one very similar to yours, where I
    was about to true the wheel vertically, something which I *hate* doing
    (as I suck at it) only to see after careful observation, that it was a
    poorly manufactured tire doing the bobbing.
     
  5. Peter Cole

    Peter Cole Guest

    Zilla wrote:
    > Thanks to all I have the 37-597 tires on my
    > Schwinn now. However I noticed on the rear
    > wheel, a portion of the tire gets "oblonged"
    > when properly inflated. I take the tire and
    > tube off, put the wheel on a truing stand, and
    > the wheel itself is "pretty true". So this means
    > it's NOT the wheel. I put back the tube/tire
    > back on, inflate, and I get the same "non-
    > roundness" on the tire. I see the tire fluctuate
    > to 1/4"-3/8" from roundness when observing
    > it with a guide. It's almost as if the tire "goes
    > further" in this part of the wheel". This is near
    > the valve.
    >
    > To explain it a different way, if one looks at
    > the wheel and tire as 2 concentric circles, with
    > the wheel being the inner circle, one would
    > expect the their two circumferences to be
    > equidistant throughout, correct? Well in my
    > case, the outter circle goes "non-uniform"
    > in one part; hence the circumferences are
    > non-equidistant in that part.
    >


    I'm not sure why, but I've had some problems getting tires to seat
    evenly on some rims. I've used a bit of liquid soap and temporary over
    pressure to persuade things to go on straight.
     
  6. On Sat, 06 May 2006 13:18:09 -0400, Peter Cole
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Zilla wrote:
    >> Thanks to all I have the 37-597 tires on my
    >> Schwinn now. However I noticed on the rear
    >> wheel, a portion of the tire gets "oblonged"
    >> when properly inflated. I take the tire and
    >> tube off, put the wheel on a truing stand, and
    >> the wheel itself is "pretty true". So this means
    >> it's NOT the wheel. I put back the tube/tire
    >> back on, inflate, and I get the same "non-
    >> roundness" on the tire. I see the tire fluctuate
    >> to 1/4"-3/8" from roundness when observing
    >> it with a guide. It's almost as if the tire "goes
    >> further" in this part of the wheel". This is near
    >> the valve.
    >>
    >> To explain it a different way, if one looks at
    >> the wheel and tire as 2 concentric circles, with
    >> the wheel being the inner circle, one would
    >> expect the their two circumferences to be
    >> equidistant throughout, correct? Well in my
    >> case, the outter circle goes "non-uniform"
    >> in one part; hence the circumferences are
    >> non-equidistant in that part.
    >>

    >
    > I'm not sure why, but I've had some problems getting tires to seat
    >evenly on some rims. I've used a bit of liquid soap and temporary over
    >pressure to persuade things to go on straight.


    Dear Peter,

    Sometimes the stupid sidewalls just stick against the rim.

    Soap and over-pressure help, but can be hard to come by in
    the field.

    Another trick is to inflate the stubborn tire lightly and
    then use both thumbs to push in repeatedly where the
    sidewall is playing coy. The sidewall will often lose its
    shyness and emerge.

    Cheers,

    Carl Fogel
     
  7. Peter Cole

    Peter Cole Guest

    [email protected] wrote:
    > On Sat, 06 May 2006 13:18:09 -0400, Peter Cole
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> Zilla wrote:
    >>> Thanks to all I have the 37-597 tires on my
    >>> Schwinn now. However I noticed on the rear
    >>> wheel, a portion of the tire gets "oblonged"
    >>> when properly inflated. I take the tire and
    >>> tube off, put the wheel on a truing stand, and
    >>> the wheel itself is "pretty true". So this means
    >>> it's NOT the wheel. I put back the tube/tire
    >>> back on, inflate, and I get the same "non-
    >>> roundness" on the tire. I see the tire fluctuate
    >>> to 1/4"-3/8" from roundness when observing
    >>> it with a guide. It's almost as if the tire "goes
    >>> further" in this part of the wheel". This is near
    >>> the valve.
    >>>
    >>> To explain it a different way, if one looks at
    >>> the wheel and tire as 2 concentric circles, with
    >>> the wheel being the inner circle, one would
    >>> expect the their two circumferences to be
    >>> equidistant throughout, correct? Well in my
    >>> case, the outter circle goes "non-uniform"
    >>> in one part; hence the circumferences are
    >>> non-equidistant in that part.
    >>>

    >> I'm not sure why, but I've had some problems getting tires to seat
    >> evenly on some rims. I've used a bit of liquid soap and temporary over
    >> pressure to persuade things to go on straight.

    >
    > Dear Peter,
    >
    > Sometimes the stupid sidewalls just stick against the rim.
    >
    > Soap and over-pressure help, but can be hard to come by in
    > the field.


    No, but you needn't have a tire perfectly mounted to get home.


    > Another trick is to inflate the stubborn tire lightly and
    > then use both thumbs to push in repeatedly where the
    > sidewall is playing coy. The sidewall will often lose its
    > shyness and emerge.


    Perhaps, but I can attest to some that have stubbornly resisted that
    (the default) method of seating tires.
     
  8. landotter

    landotter Guest

    [email protected] wrote:
    > On Sat, 06 May 2006 13:18:09 -0400, Peter Cole
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >Zilla wrote:
    > >> Thanks to all I have the 37-597 tires on my
    > >> Schwinn now. However I noticed on the rear
    > >> wheel, a portion of the tire gets "oblonged"
    > >> when properly inflated. I take the tire and
    > >> tube off, put the wheel on a truing stand, and
    > >> the wheel itself is "pretty true". So this means
    > >> it's NOT the wheel. I put back the tube/tire
    > >> back on, inflate, and I get the same "non-
    > >> roundness" on the tire. I see the tire fluctuate
    > >> to 1/4"-3/8" from roundness when observing
    > >> it with a guide. It's almost as if the tire "goes
    > >> further" in this part of the wheel". This is near
    > >> the valve.
    > >>
    > >> To explain it a different way, if one looks at
    > >> the wheel and tire as 2 concentric circles, with
    > >> the wheel being the inner circle, one would
    > >> expect the their two circumferences to be
    > >> equidistant throughout, correct? Well in my
    > >> case, the outter circle goes "non-uniform"
    > >> in one part; hence the circumferences are
    > >> non-equidistant in that part.
    > >>

    > >
    > > I'm not sure why, but I've had some problems getting tires to seat
    > >evenly on some rims. I've used a bit of liquid soap and temporary over
    > >pressure to persuade things to go on straight.

    >
    > Dear Peter,
    >
    > Sometimes the stupid sidewalls just stick against the rim.
    >
    > Soap and over-pressure help, but can be hard to come by in
    > the field.
    >
    > Another trick is to inflate the stubborn tire lightly and
    > then use both thumbs to push in repeatedly where the
    > sidewall is playing coy.


    I like to use the palms of my hands as I hate sore "tire thumbs". ;-)
     
  9. Zilla

    Zilla Guest

    <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > On Sat, 06 May 2006 13:18:09 -0400, Peter Cole
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >Zilla wrote:
    > >> Thanks to all I have the 37-597 tires on my
    > >> Schwinn now. However I noticed on the rear
    > >> wheel, a portion of the tire gets "oblonged"
    > >> when properly inflated. I take the tire and
    > >> tube off, put the wheel on a truing stand, and
    > >> the wheel itself is "pretty true". So this means
    > >> it's NOT the wheel. I put back the tube/tire
    > >> back on, inflate, and I get the same "non-
    > >> roundness" on the tire. I see the tire fluctuate
    > >> to 1/4"-3/8" from roundness when observing
    > >> it with a guide. It's almost as if the tire "goes
    > >> further" in this part of the wheel". This is near
    > >> the valve.
    > >>
    > >> To explain it a different way, if one looks at
    > >> the wheel and tire as 2 concentric circles, with
    > >> the wheel being the inner circle, one would
    > >> expect the their two circumferences to be
    > >> equidistant throughout, correct? Well in my
    > >> case, the outter circle goes "non-uniform"
    > >> in one part; hence the circumferences are
    > >> non-equidistant in that part.
    > >>

    > >
    > > I'm not sure why, but I've had some problems getting tires to seat
    > >evenly on some rims. I've used a bit of liquid soap and temporary over
    > >pressure to persuade things to go on straight.

    >
    > Dear Peter,
    >
    > Sometimes the stupid sidewalls just stick against the rim.
    >
    > Soap and over-pressure help, but can be hard to come by in
    > the field.
    >
    > Another trick is to inflate the stubborn tire lightly and
    > then use both thumbs to push in repeatedly where the
    > sidewall is playing coy. The sidewall will often lose its
    > shyness and emerge.
    >
    > Cheers,
    >
    > Carl Fogel


    I tried this last night to no avail. I'll try the overinflate
    method.

    --
    - Zilla
    Cary, NC USA
    (Remove XSPAM)
     
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