Old bike to new

Discussion in 'Mountain Bikes' started by Steve, May 3, 2003.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. Steve

    Steve Guest

    I have an old (about 5 yrs) Mongoose Hill Topper.

    I want a new bike, but cannot afford one, so this is what I was thinking, let me know what
    you think.

    I am thinking of piece by peice changing this bike until it is a new one. Example, first I will
    change out the solid forks to shocks, then later when can afford will replace wheels, then will
    replace crank and drive, then later on I can change the frame and shift system. Thinking this will
    take about 2 years to do piece by piece so I can afford it.

    A) Is it a good idea?
    B) Will it work?
     
    Tags:


  2. Penny S.

    Penny S. Guest

    Steve wrote:
    > I have an old (about 5 yrs) Mongoose Hill Topper.
    >
    > I want a new bike, but cannot afford one, so this is what I was thinking, let me know what
    > you think.
    >
    > I am thinking of piece by peice changing this bike until it is a new one. Example, first I will
    > change out the solid forks to shocks, then later when can afford will replace wheels, then will
    > replace crank and drive, then later on I can change the frame and shift system. Thinking this will
    > take about 2 years to do piece by piece so I can afford it.
    >
    > A) Is it a good idea?
    > B) Will it work?

    you have to consider the frame... is it even worth building it into a new bike or not?
    **Generally** if you have a really good frame sure, but it's what gets referred to as a "wal-goose"
    don't waste your money... now if it's a ti-goose like my friend has, that's a different story...

    Penny
     
  3. Steve wrote:
    > I have an old (about 5 yrs) Mongoose Hill Topper.
    >
    > I want a new bike, but cannot afford one, so this is what I was thinking, let me know what
    > you think.
    >
    > I am thinking of piece by peice changing this bike until it is a new one. Example, first I will
    > change out the solid forks to shocks, then later when can afford will replace wheels, then will
    > replace crank and drive, then later on I can change the frame and shift system. Thinking this will
    > take about 2 years to do piece by piece so I can afford it.
    >
    > A) Is it a good idea?

    no.

    > B) Will it work?

    yes.

    Buy a good new or used frame and build it up with good new or used parts while keeping your existing
    bike rolling along.
     
  4. John Morgan

    John Morgan Guest

    > A) Is it a good idea?

    No. Upgrading this way, you will run into lots of compatibility issues. Also, buying aftermarket
    parts will cost you far more in the long run than just buying a complete bike.

    > B) Will it work?

    Yes. But with bike shops that offer 12 month same as cash financing, you can get the bike you want
    now with no hassle of upgrading parts, and save yourself a bundle of money.

    -John Morgan
     
  5. Slacker

    Slacker Guest

    > > A) Is it a good idea?
    >
    > No. Upgrading this way, you will run into lots of compatibility issues. Also, buying aftermarket
    > parts will cost you far more in the long run than just buying a complete bike.
    >
    > > B) Will it work?
    >
    > Yes. But with bike shops that offer 12 month same as cash financing, you can get the bike you want
    > now with no hassle of upgrading parts, and save yourself a bundle of money.
    >
    > -John Morgan

    Dang it John, you almost make me want to drive over to SuperGo and get a BigHit for the slow hit to
    the wallet!

    Good thing they don't come stock with a Romic and Shiver.
    --
    Slacker
     
  6. Steve

    Steve Guest

    OK, then for us financially challenged, what is a good, not great, bike i can get for not a whole
    lot of money? ANything in the $400-$500 range?

    "John Morgan" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > > A) Is it a good idea?
    >
    > No. Upgrading this way, you will run into lots of compatibility issues. Also, buying aftermarket
    > parts will cost you far more in the long run than just buying a complete bike.
    >
    > > B) Will it work?
    >
    > Yes. But with bike shops that offer 12 month same as cash financing, you can get the bike you want
    > now with no hassle of upgrading parts, and save yourself a bundle of money.
    >
    > -John Morgan
     
  7. On Sun, 04 May 2003 05:15:01 +0000, Steve did issue forth:

    > OK, then for us financially challenged, what is a good, not great, bike i can get for not a whole
    > lot of money? ANything in the $400-$500 range?

    Try looking at some of the offerings from Specialized.

    Things to bear in mind at that price range:
    * Full suspension bikes will be awful. Avoid them like the plague.
    * Disc brakes aren't essential. Go for V-brakes and you'll get more bang for your buck on the rest
    of the bike.

    And look at last year's bikes too, you might get some bargains there.

    --
    Huw Pritchard
     
  8. John Morgan

    John Morgan Guest

    > Dang it John, you almost make me want to drive over to SuperGo and get a
    BigHit for the slow hit to the wallet!
    >
    > Good thing they don't come stock with a Romic and Shiver.
    > --
    > Slacker

    Dang it Slacker, I try to keep my place of employment on the D/L, and ya just gotta go blabbing it
    to everybody. LOL! Actually, Supergo is the only place I know of that offers that kind of
    financing... ;)

    -John Morgan
     
  9. John Morgan

    John Morgan Guest

    > Try looking at some of the offerings from Specialized.
    >
    > Things to bear in mind at that price range:
    > * Full suspension bikes will be awful. Avoid them like the plague.
    > * Disc brakes aren't essential. Go for V-brakes and you'll get more bang for your buck on the rest
    > of the bike.
    >
    > And look at last year's bikes too, you might get some bargains there.

    Agreed. Check out the Rockhopper Comp.
     
  10. B. Sanders

    B. Sanders Guest

    "Huw Pritchard" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > On Sun, 04 May 2003 05:15:01 +0000, Steve did issue forth:
    >
    > > OK, then for us financially challenged, what is a good, not great, bike
    i
    > > can get for not a whole lot of money? ANything in the $400-$500 range?
    >
    > Try looking at some of the offerings from Specialized.
    >
    > Things to bear in mind at that price range:
    > * Full suspension bikes will be awful. Avoid them like the plague.
    > * Disc brakes aren't essential. Go for V-brakes and you'll get more bang for your buck on the rest
    > of the bike.
    >
    > And look at last year's bikes too, you might get some bargains there.

    Word. Huw is exactly right. Basic v-brakes, even cheap cranks are OK. You need excellent frame
    geometry, good fork (coil, with damping), at least a Shimano Deore drivetrain.

    I've seen some remaindered Schwinn Mesa GSX's for like $379 with Avid discs and decent components.
    Not a light bike; but a good bike.

    Jamis, KHS, Giant and Fuji have the best bang-for-the-buck in that price range, IMO. There's a lot
    to look at for $500-ish these days. The good ol' Giant Iguana is a helluva nice bike for like $400.

    Stay away from the big sporting good superstores. Just don't even set foot in one. Buy your bike
    from a local bike shop with a reputation for friendly service (even if they're a wee bit more
    expensive). Believe me, you will be glad you did. Bike setup is hugely important. Make sure that
    they get it right, and definitely go back for the 30-day checkup.

    Good luck.

    Barry
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
Loading...