old bikes

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by mewthree, Oct 5, 2004.

  1. mewthree

    mewthree Guest

    i have a old bike i got second hand and the gears sticks are down on the
    frame. are these bikes dangerous? decatholon will not sell them now.
     
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  2. Davo

    Davo Guest

    there not dangerous........just old spec

    [email protected]

    the bigger the ring the more it hurts



    "mewthree" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >i have a old bike i got second hand and the gears sticks are down on the
    >frame. are these bikes dangerous? decatholon will not sell them now.
    >
     
  3. Tony W

    Tony W Guest

    "mewthree" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > i have a old bike i got second hand and the gears sticks are down on the
    > frame. are these bikes dangerous? decatholon will not sell them now.


    A perfectly reasonable place to put the changers. You will probably find
    you change gear a little less often but you will soon get used to them.

    T
     
  4. Simon Brooke

    Simon Brooke Guest

    in message <[email protected]>, mewthree
    ('[email protected]') wrote:

    > i have a old bike i got second hand and the gears sticks are down on
    > the frame. are these bikes dangerous?


    No, not in the least. Lance Armstrong used such a bike during part of
    this year's Tour de France. A downtube-type shifter for the front
    deraileur is sometimes preferred to an STI shifter because you can trim
    it (you cannot so precisely trim an STI). Also it is lighter. So
    professional riders still use them for particular stages and races.

    --
    [email protected] (Simon Brooke) http://www.jasmine.org.uk/~simon/

    ;; Diplomacy, American: see Intelligence, Military
     
  5. Paul Rudin

    Paul Rudin Guest

    "mewthree" <[email protected]> writes:

    > i have a old bike i got second hand and the gears sticks are down on the
    > frame. are these bikes dangerous? decatholon will not sell them now.


    Nothing wrong with them, I still have one bike with shifters down
    there, although I hardly ever use it these days, since buying a new
    road bike this summer.
     
  6. MSeries

    MSeries Guest

    mewthree wrote:
    > i have a old bike i got second hand and the gears sticks are down on

    the
    > frame. are these bikes dangerous? decatholon will not sell them now.

    Downtube gear changers do not make a bike dangerous.
     
  7. D.M. Procida

    D.M. Procida Guest

    mewthree <[email protected]> wrote:

    > i have a old bike i got second hand and the gears sticks are down on the
    > frame. are these bikes dangerous?


    They aren't, but apparently the ones which stick up in the middle of the
    handlebars can cause groin and stomach injuries.

    Daniele
    --
    Apple Juice Ltd
    Chapter Arts Centre
    Market Road www.apple-juice.co.uk
    Cardiff CF5 1QE 029 2019 0140
     
  8. soup

    soup Guest

    mewthree popped their head over the parapet saw what was going on and
    said
    > i have a old bike i got second hand and the gears sticks are down on
    > the frame. are these bikes dangerous? decatholon will not sell them
    > now.


    My road bike has down tube shifters did find that there
    was a minor wobble as I reached down to change gear
    but that was more me than the position of the shifters .
    MUCH easier to find gears (if your cable has stretched
    a bit ) than index shifters as you can 'tweak' the shift/cable
    slightly to get rid of any annoying (ineficient) rattles.

    Looking for advice bit, said bike has been out the back
    for ages (while I have been shooting about on the ATB)
    now it needs the wheels replaced along with new tyres,
    innertubes etc.Thing is will I use the 5 speed casette on
    the back wheel or should I get a whole new casette
    (can you still get 5 speed casettes or will I need to widen
    the frame?) or will this mean I have to get new chain rings
    and a new chain or should I just louse this bike as I don't
    think it is a whoope do one (£70:00 S/H 14 years ago)
    and so not really worth the expense of doing it up.
    Or living in Edinburgh, well Balerno, could give it to
    the bike station thing at Waverley (they may have spare
    parts lying about).The more I describe what needs
    replaced the more uneconomic the repair seems.

    Frame is some sort of steel "Raleigh" job sorry but
    I can see no other marks on the frame i.e. what sort
    of tube it is made from (it had been resprayed before
    I bought it). Crank set is riveted rather than screwed
    another clue that this bike is not of the best quality.


    --
    yours S

    Nihil curo de ista tua stulta superstitione
     
  9. MSeries

    MSeries Guest

    soup wrote:
    > mewthree popped their head over the parapet saw what was going on and
    > said
    > > i have a old bike i got second hand and the gears sticks are down

    on
    > > the frame. are these bikes dangerous? decatholon will not sell them
    > > now.

    >
    > My road bike has down tube shifters did find that there
    > was a minor wobble as I reached down to change gear
    > but that was more me than the position of the shifters .
    > MUCH easier to find gears (if your cable has stretched
    > a bit ) than index shifters as you can 'tweak' the shift/cable
    > slightly to get rid of any annoying (ineficient) rattles.


    I think you are referring to friction shifters, it IS possible and IMHO
    not a bad option to have indexed downtube shifters.


    >
    > Looking for advice bit, said bike has been out the back
    > for ages (while I have been shooting about on the ATB)
    > now it needs the wheels replaced along with new tyres,
    > innertubes etc.Thing is will I use the 5 speed casette on
    > the back wheel or should I get a whole new casette
    > (can you still get 5 speed casettes or will I need to widen
    > the frame?) or will this mean I have to get new chain rings
    > and a new chain or should I just louse this bike as I don't
    > think it is a whoope do one (£70:00 S/H 14 years ago)
    > and so not really worth the expense of doing it up.
    > Or living in Edinburgh, well Balerno, could give it to
    > the bike station thing at Waverley (they may have spare
    > parts lying about).The more I describe what needs
    > replaced the more uneconomic the repair seems.



    I don't think you can get 5 speed cassettes, you could make one but I
    expect your hub is not a cassette hub.

    >
    > Frame is some sort of steel "Raleigh" job sorry but
    > I can see no other marks on the frame i.e. what sort
    > of tube it is made from (it had been resprayed before
    > I bought it). Crank set is riveted rather than screwed
    > another clue that this bike is not of the best quality.


    If you really want to keep the bike the best option might be to buy
    another similar s/h one to canabalise.
     
  10. soup

    soup Guest

    MSeries popped their head over the parapet saw what was going on and
    said

    > I think you are referring to friction shifters,


    Yes, did mean friction shifters sorry for any confusion

    > I don't think you can get 5 speed cassettes, you could make one but I
    > expect your hub is not a cassette hub.


    Yup sloppy writing again just used casette to mean the
    'gang' of sprockets on the back wheel whether I should have
    called it something else I don't know.

    > If you really want to keep the bike the best option might be to buy
    > another similar s/h one to canabalise.


    Not that bothered about keeping this bike was more looking
    for a 'cheap' way to renovate a second bike I already have
    but think I will just louse it or give it to some charity (if anybody
    wants it). Have already used the pedals of it, as the bearings
    went on the ones on the ATB, also took the rear "Derailleur"
    from it as the one on the ATB was bent .

    --
    yours S

    Nihil curo de ista tua stulta superstitione
     
  11. Dave Kahn

    Dave Kahn Guest

    "mewthree" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > i have a old bike i got second hand and the gears sticks are down on the
    > frame. are these bikes dangerous? decatholon will not sell them now.


    Modern gear changing systems are so much easier to use that they have
    made the downtube lever obsolete. However, there is nothing
    intrinsically wrong with downtube levers. They are light, reliable,
    mechanically simple, and perfectly safe.

    --
    Dave...
     
  12. MSeries

    MSeries Guest

    Dave Kahn wrote:

    > Modern gear changing systems are so much easier to use that they have
    > made the downtube lever obsolete. However, there is nothing
    > intrinsically wrong with downtube levers. They are light, reliable,
    > mechanically simple, and perfectly safe.
    >


    Not sure I agree with you about the reason why dt levers are used less.
    They are not obsolete on 2 of my bikes !! ;-) The fact they are "light,
    reliable, mechanically simple" makes them worthy of a place on my
    machines. I have no plans to sunset them, in fact I am toying with the
    idea of dsipensing with the front mech STi on #1RI and fitting a dt
    lever, much more reliable and lighter.
     
  13. Peter Clinch

    Peter Clinch Guest

    MSeries wrote:

    > idea of dsipensing with the front mech STi on #1RI and fitting a dt
    > lever, much more reliable and lighter.


    Is that not the general setup that Lance Armstrong uses?

    Pete.
    --
    Peter Clinch Medical Physics IT Officer
    Tel 44 1382 660111 ext. 33637 Univ. of Dundee, Ninewells Hospital
    Fax 44 1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK
    net [email protected] http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/
     
  14. MSeries

    MSeries Guest

    Peter Clinch wrote:

    > Is that not the general setup that Lance Armstrong uses?
    >
    > Pete.



    For mountain stages of the Tour de France it is. He doesn't use a
    triple chainset though. When I used a double the changing was good,
    especially since the Ulty levers are universal and when used with a
    double there is an amount of trim available. Now with a triple the
    adjustment is not yet spot on so changing to the smallest ring is
    sometimes troublesome. Before I make such a switch I'm going to
    persevere with trying to get it set up properly. My situation may be
    slightly complicated by the fact I am using 52/39/30 chainrings and the
    39 is not ramped and pinned specifically for triple use so it doesn't
    encourage the chain to move further down. Ulty comes with 52/42/30 and
    I am used to using a 39 so I have stuck with it. Friction shifting a
    front mech is pretty easy to set up properly and TBH I have always
    wondered why indexed was ever invented for this, especially for double.
     
  15. Pete Biggs

    Pete Biggs Guest

    soup wrote:
    > mewthree popped their head over the parapet saw what was going on and
    > said
    >> i have a old bike i got second hand and the gears sticks are down on
    >> the frame. are these bikes dangerous?


    Only with stupid riders, who choose stupid moments to change gear, like,
    say, on a blind bend at 30 mph.

    > My road bike has down tube shifters did find that there
    > was a minor wobble as I reached down to change gear
    > but that was more me than the position of the shifters .
    > MUCH easier to find gears (if your cable has stretched
    > a bit ) than index shifters as you can 'tweak' the shift/cable
    > slightly to get rid of any annoying (ineficient) rattles.


    I used to use the best of both worlds: indexed down tube levers with a
    friction mode. I used to love them, but that was when I only had 6 cogs
    and tons of energy and a non-knackered back. Ergo levers are the business
    for me now.

    > Looking for advice bit, said bike has been out the back
    > for ages (while I have been shooting about on the ATB)
    > now it needs the wheels replaced along with new tyres,
    > innertubes etc.Thing is will I use the 5 speed casette on
    > the back wheel or should I get a whole new casette
    > (can you still get 5 speed casettes or will I need to widen
    > the frame?)


    Local bike shop may have suitable 5 (and maybe 6) speed freewheels.

    > or will this mean I have to get new chain rings
    > and a new chain


    New chain if the existing one is well worn. Might get away with the
    rings, though.

    > or should I just louse this bike as I don't
    > think it is a whoope do one (£70:00 S/H 14 years ago)
    > and so not really worth the expense of doing it up.
    > Or living in Edinburgh, well Balerno, could give it to
    > the bike station thing at Waverley (they may have spare
    > parts lying about).The more I describe what needs
    > replaced the more uneconomic the repair seems.


    I know the feeling. If the frame is good for you then I think it's worth
    doing up with parts salvaged from another second-hand bike. Of course,
    you might prefer the other bike instead altogether :)

    ~PB
     
  16. Pete Biggs

    Pete Biggs Guest

    MSeries wrote:
    > For mountain stages of the Tour de France it is. He doesn't use a
    > triple chainset though. When I used a double the changing was good,
    > especially since the Ulty levers are universal and when used with a
    > double there is an amount of trim available. Now with a triple the
    > adjustment is not yet spot on so changing to the smallest ring is
    > sometimes troublesome. Before I make such a switch I'm going to
    > persevere with trying to get it set up properly. My situation may be
    > slightly complicated by the fact I am using 52/39/30 chainrings and
    > the 39 is not ramped and pinned specifically for triple use so it
    > doesn't encourage the chain to move further down. Ulty comes with
    > 52/42/30 and I am used to using a 39 so I have stuck with it.


    Chicken Cycles (distributors) have TA pinned middles, but pins (and most
    of the ramping) are actually for changing up. They help pick up the chain
    from the smaller ring. I'm quite sure of that because I've watched them
    working and recently had improved shifting after trying a pinned middle
    ring in place of the non pinned one I normally use (but didn't stick with
    it cos wrong size).

    So I doubt the middle ring is to blame for the problems going down. I
    would try tweaking angle and height of front mech then a different
    make/model front mech. Alternatively, perhaps a Chain Watcher or Deda Dog
    Fang would help by allowing you to limit the mech less, so you could shift
    further inboard without fear of loosing the chain -- a crude but effective
    way of plonking on granny quickly.

    ~PB
     
  17. Dave Kahn

    Dave Kahn Guest

    "MSeries" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > Dave Kahn wrote:
    >
    > > Modern gear changing systems are so much easier to use that they have
    > > made the downtube lever obsolete. However, there is nothing
    > > intrinsically wrong with downtube levers. They are light, reliable,
    > > mechanically simple, and perfectly safe.
    > >

    >
    > Not sure I agree with you about the reason why dt levers are used less.


    So what is the reason? It takes skill and practice to use d/t levers
    effectively. Modern systems are much easier to use and give precise
    effortless shifting. D/t levers have become rare because they've been
    usurped by something that manufacturers prefer to supply and consumers
    prefer to buy in spite of the added weight and complexity. That sounds
    like obsolescence to me.

    --
    Dave...
     
  18. MSeries

    MSeries Guest

    Pete Biggs wrote:
    >> So I doubt the middle ring is to blame for the problems going down.

    I
    > would try tweaking angle and height of front mech then a different
    > make/model front mech. Alternatively, perhaps a Chain Watcher or

    Deda Dog
    > Fang would help by allowing you to limit the mech less, so you could

    shift
    > further inboard without fear of loosing the chain -- a crude but

    effective
    > way of plonking on granny quickly.


    I am pretty sure its due to mal adjustment. Its not very serious as I
    have developed a technique to complete the shift anyway. I have made an
    adjsutment but so far not road tested it. The problem isn't bad enough
    to warrant a new mech. I chose a DA mech as opposed to Ulty as DA is
    optimised for 52/39/30 and Ulty isn't. I'd rather fit dt lever that
    fanny around with new mechs, then I know it will work as I want it and
    I already have a DA front mech lever going spare. [Its partner, the
    rear, is on my Royal for the 8 of 9 on 6 trick]
     
  19. "MSeries" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...

    > Friction shifting a
    > front mech is pretty easy to set up properly and TBH I have always
    > wondered why indexed was ever invented for this, especially for double.


    Depends on the system - Campag Ergopower uses a fine ratchet and so
    can be trimmed to a reasonable degree, as well as allowing the same
    pattern of lever to be used for doubles or triples. Both Shimano on-
    and off-road STI, as I've found on my Trek MTB, simply use a 2- or
    3-position ratchet (depending on the type of front mech & chainset)
    with far less scope for adjustment and unpleasant scraping noises with
    certain gear combinations.

    David E. Belcher
     
  20. "MSeries" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...

    > Not sure I agree with you about the reason why dt levers are used less.
    > They are not obsolete on 2 of my bikes !! ;-) The fact they are "light,
    > reliable, mechanically simple" makes them worthy of a place on my
    > machines. I have no plans to sunset them, in fact I am toying with the
    > idea of dsipensing with the front mech STi on #1RI and fitting a dt
    > lever, much more reliable and lighter.


    I use a broadly similar set-up for cyclo-cross, though I have to
    confess it was done mostly on cost grounds (I had a lone Simplex
    bar-end lever - to use with the front mech - in the bits box already,
    got a pair of Saccon aero levers for only six quid or so - though I
    only needed one - and bought a Campag Chorus 9sp Ergo lever very
    cheaply just because it was an odd R/H one with no L/H partner)!

    David E. Belcher
     
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