Old Campagnolo track hub

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Bob Shanteau, May 15, 2003.

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  1. Bob Shanteau

    Bob Shanteau Guest

    I recently started breaking spokes in a front wheel that I rebuilt in about 1978. The spokes broke
    at the nipple, apparently from corrosion (I live on the West Coast.)

    The wheel has an old (mid 1960's?) Campagnolo front track high flange hub that came on a used Brooks
    track bike I bought in 1972. The hub has a steel barrel and aluminum flanges.

    After I took the wheel apart and inspected the hub, I noticed that each spoke hole is chamfered
    (rounded or countersunk) on one side only (alternating sides, of course). I have built a lot of
    wheels, and all the hubs with aluminum flanges that I have encountered have spoke holes that are
    chamfered on both sides.

    My question is: On which side does the spoke head go?

    My first thought was that the head goes in the chamfered side, in order to provide a place for the
    spoke head to sit in.

    But on the other hand, it would make sense that the chamfer is intended to support the spoke elbow.

    Which is it?
     
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  2. Bob-<< I noticed that each spoke hole is chamfered (rounded or countersunk) on one side only

    These countersunk holes are for the spoke shaft, not the spoke head. For a better spoke line outta
    the hub for the spoke. These were common until about 1989 or so with higher end Campagnolo and even
    Maavic hubs.

    Peter Chisholm Vecchio's Bicicletteria 1833 Pearl St. Boulder, CO, 80302
    (303)440-3535 http://www.vecchios.com "Ruote convenzionali costruite eccezionalmente bene"
     
  3. A Muzi

    A Muzi Guest

    "Bob Shanteau" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I recently started breaking spokes in a front wheel that I rebuilt in
    about
    > 1978. The spokes broke at the nipple, apparently from corrosion (I live on the West Coast.)
    >
    > The wheel has an old (mid 1960's?) Campagnolo front track high flange hub that came on a used
    > Brooks track bike I bought in 1972. The hub has a
    steel
    > barrel and aluminum flanges.
    >
    > After I took the wheel apart and inspected the hub, I noticed that each spoke hole is chamfered
    > (rounded or countersunk) on one side only (alternating sides, of course). I have built a lot of
    > wheels, and all the hubs with aluminum flanges that I have encountered have spoke holes that
    are
    > chamfered on both sides.
    >
    > My question is: On which side does the spoke head go?
    >
    > My first thought was that the head goes in the chamfered side, in order to provide a place for the
    > spoke head to sit in.
    >
    > But on the other hand, it would make sense that the chamfer is intended to support the
    > spoke elbow.
    >
    > Which is it?

    It is chamfered to support more of the spoke's curve. The head goes on the "plain" side.

    --
    Andrew Muzi http://www.yellowjersey.org Open every day since 1 April 1971
     
  4. Jim Adney

    Jim Adney Guest

    On Thu, 15 May 2003 05:41:19 GMT "Bob Shanteau" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >The wheel has an old (mid 1960's?) Campagnolo front track high flange hub that came on a used
    >Brooks track bike I bought in 1972. The hub has a steel barrel and aluminum flanges.

    I've never seen a Campy 3-piece hub. Are you sure this is actually a Campy item. If so, is it
    just a lot older than the other parts I've seen. My experience goes back to the early 60s. How
    old is this hub?

    -
    -----------------------------------------------
    Jim Adney [email protected] Madison, WI 53711 USA
    -----------------------------------------------
     
  5. Bob Shanteau

    Bob Shanteau Guest

    "A Muzi" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > It is chamfered to support more of the spoke's curve. The head goes on the "plain" side.

    Thanks. The wheel is now built with the head on the plain side and the chamfer supporting the
    spoke's curve.
     
  6. On Fri, 16 May 2003 17:31:16 +0000, Jim Adney wrote:

    > On Thu, 15 May 2003 05:41:19 GMT "Bob Shanteau" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>The wheel has an old (mid 1960's?) Campagnolo front track high flange hub that came on a used
    >>Brooks track bike I bought in 1972. The hub has a steel barrel and aluminum flanges.
    >
    > I've never seen a Campy 3-piece hub. Are you sure this is actually a Campy item. If so, is it just
    > a lot older than the other parts I've seen. My experience goes back to the early 60s. How old is
    > this hub?

    I was wondering that, too. I have a '65 (or maybe older) set of Campy track hubs, and they are
    one-piece aluminum. IĀ also have a quite old FB front hub that is three-piece with a steel barrel.

    Can you (OP) post a picture of this hub?

    --

    David L. Johnson

    __o | To announce that there must be no criticism of the president, or _`\(,_ | that we are to
    stand by the president right or wrong, is not (_)/ (_) | only unpatriotic and servile, but is
    morally treasonable to the American public. --Theodore Roosevelt
     
  7. Tw406

    Tw406 Guest

    << The hub has a steel
    >barrel and aluminum flanges. >>

    Late 50s early 60s.
     
  8. "David L. Johnson" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On Fri, 16 May 2003 17:31:16 +0000, Jim Adney wrote:

    > > I've never seen a Campy 3-piece hub. Are you sure this is actually a Campy item. If so, is it
    > > just a lot older than the other parts I've seen. My experience goes back to the early
    > > 60s. How old is this hub?

    > I was wondering that, too. I have a '65 (or maybe older) set of Campy track hubs, and they are
    > one-piece aluminum.

    They were produced during the 1950s, superseded in about 1958 by the first one-piece aluminium hubs.
    My impression is that the small-flange model was more common than the large-flange.

    A pair is about to close on eBay: http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=3607667532

    James Thomson
     
  9. Bob Shanteau

    Bob Shanteau Guest

    "Jim Adney" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > >The wheel has an old (mid 1960's?) Campagnolo front track high flange hub that came on a used
    > >Brooks track bike I bought in 1972. The hub has a steel barrel and aluminum flanges.
    >
    > I've never seen a Campy 3-piece hub. Are you sure this is actually a Campy item. If so, is it just
    > a lot older than the other parts I've seen. My experience goes back to the early 60s. How old is
    > this hub?

    I don't know any more about the hub than I've already told you. The bike from was maybe 10-15 years
    old in 1972, which would have made it new in about 1952-1957. (Andrew Muzi reports that Campy
    started making one-piece aluminum shells in 1958.)

    I replaced the axle, cones and locknuts when I bought a new Schwinn Paramount track frame in about
    1978. The old axle was spaced for 95 mm (that was my measurement, but it could be 96 mm, according
    to Sheldon's site), whereas the new frame was spaced at the current standard of 100 mm. The old
    axle's diameter was also smaller than the 9 mm that the new frame expected. I still have the old
    axle with the original axle nuts. I sold the Brooks frame at about the same time.

    Unfortunately, the hub's steel barrel is rusted in several spots, due to the salt air here near
    the ocean.

    The front hub has 32 spokes and the rear 40, which I understand was common practice in Great Britain
    at the time. I had no trouble with it before it started breaking spokes at the nipple, despite
    throwing the bike around during sprints over the years. I built it cross 3 with what appear to be
    15-16 gauge Stella spokes (no longer in business, as I understand). I weighed about 185 lbs in the
    day and 210 lbs now.

    For the new build, I used 14-15 gauge Wheelsmith spokes. The hub is apparently designed for smaller
    spokes as I had to thread the new spokes through the holes.
     
  10. Bob Shanteau wrote:

    "My question is: On which side does the spoke head go?

    My first thought was that the head goes in the chamfered side, in order to provide a place for the
    spoke head to sit in.

    But on the other hand, it would make sense that the chamfer is intended to support the spoke elbow.

    Which is it?"

    Right the second time. The countersink is NOT for the spoke head to sit in, but to reduce stress
    risers on the bend.

    May you have the wind at your back. And a really low gear for the hills! Chris

    Chris'Z Corner "The Website for the Common Bicyclist": http://www.geocities.com/czcorner
     
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