Old Grill Question

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Tim, Mar 4, 2004.

  1. Tim

    Tim Guest

    Hello,

    Does anyone remember what type of older style natural gas grill was the "generic" standard of
    natural gas grills, with just a post in the ground about 15 years ago? I thought that there was
    one company that made most of them...

    Thanks...
     
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  2. Wff_ng_6

    Wff_ng_6 Guest

    "Tim" <[email protected]> wrote:
    > Does anyone remember what type of older style natural gas grill was the "generic" standard of
    > natural gas grills, with just a post in the ground about 15 years ago? I thought that there was
    > one company that made most of them...

    If you are actually talking about gas grilles older than that, Charmglow was more or less the
    standard back in the 1960s and 70s for these. Gas grilles were relatively rare back then, most
    everyone was using charcoal. I don't know how long Charmglow remained dominant in the market.
     
  3. Nancree

    Nancree Guest

    >> Does anyone remember what type of older style natural gas grill was the "generic" standard of
    >> natural gas grills, with just a post in the ground about 15 years ago?
    ---------------------------------
    Just curious. Where does the gas come from? Here at our condominium the gas comes up from the
    ground, through the pipe--requiring quite some installation work. Perhaps there is another type that
    has a changeable small gas tank attached underneath the grill.
     
  4. In article <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] (Tim) wrote:

    > Hello,
    >
    > Does anyone remember what type of older style natural gas grill was the "generic" standard of
    > natural gas grills, with just a post in the ground about 15 years ago? I thought that there was
    > one company that made most of them...
    >
    > Thanks...

    Ours was Charmglow.
    --
    -Barb, <www.jamlady.eboard.com> updated 2-19-04 -- Dufus picture posted!
     
  5. L Beck

    L Beck Guest

    "Nancree" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]22.aol.com...
    > >> Does anyone remember what type of older style natural gas grill was the "generic" standard
    > >> of natural gas grills, with just a post in the ground about 15 years ago?
    > ---------------------------------
    > Just curious. Where does the gas come from? Here at our condominium the
    gas
    > comes up from the ground, through the pipe--requiring quite some
    installation
    > work. Perhaps there is another type that has a changeable small gas tank attached underneath
    > the grill.
    >

    When I was a teenager my aunt and uncle moved into a new house with one of those built-in grills
    in their back yard, and yes - the gas was plumbed into it through pipes in the ground. We
    thought it was the neatest thing, but you sure had to be certain it was installed where you'd
    always want it to be.
     
  6. Penmart01

    Penmart01 Guest

    >(Nancree) writes
    >
    >>> Does anyone remember what type of older style natural gas grill was the "generic" standard of
    >>> natural gas grills, with just a post in the ground about 15 years ago?
    >---------------------------------
    >Just curious. Where does the gas come from? Here at our condominium the gas comes up from the
    >ground, through the pipe--requiring quite some installation work.

    You're lucky to have natural gas at a condo complex, most municipal fire codes throuhgout the US no
    longer permit natural gas installed in multiple dwelling complexes... in fact many don't permit
    portable propane tanks.

    If there is natural gas present at a residence it's no biggie to run an underground line out to the
    back yard... I had that at my last house, in fact I ran that line underground myself at the time I
    had the gas company swap my old oil heating system to natural gas; I asked if while they were
    running the gas line they'd add a line for my grill and so since the main was passing where I wanted
    my grill they put in a tee and ran a line through a hole they drilled in the foundation, installed a
    shut-off valve and capped the line. A few weeks later I dug a 30" deep trench and continued the gas
    line to the edge of where my new paver block patio would soon be located... a few local plumbers
    quoted me $500-$600 to continue that line from the cap, a 20' run, I did it myself in under an hour
    with $34 worth of 3/4" galvanized pipe, fittings, and pipe dope from Home Depot. I was willing to
    pay say $200 but the prices those plumbers quoted were ridiculous. The trench was easy to dig as
    that entire area had been excavated 5' deep with a backhoe about a month before when the old cement
    patio was removed and I had a new waste line installed because I didn't trust that 40 year old
    orangeburg pipe under my new patio, just my luck as soon as the patio was down that pipe would
    collapse. One plumber arrived in a new Lincoln Continental, in a dark business suit, toting an
    attache case (musta been a plumbing clown, and I don't even think he was Italian)... he wasted over
    a half hour examining and measuring the site before he'd give me his outrageous *estimate* (not a
    firm price), another half hour with calculator and writing up a proposal... had he arrived prepared
    to work he could have completed the job within the time he spent attempting to fast talk me... now I
    remember, he wasn't Itralian, he was Puerto Rican... same difference. hehe

    Tthe house I live in now had oil heat but when I moved in one of the first things I did was have the
    boiler retrofitted to propane, had a 500 gallon tank installed outside, hidden in a pine grove and
    plumbed underground to the house... ran a line for my kitchen stove and one out to the deck for my
    Weber too, both of which were converted from natural gas with inexpensive kits I had ordered
    previously, no biggie.

    Throughout NYC most every street has natural gas... in the guinea neighborhoods most all the dagos
    have an old beat to heck natural gas kitchen stove outdoors at the rear of their house (usually
    under a screened in elevated porch, that's a guido dining room btw), the WOPs do most of their
    cooking outdoors because the crapola those guidos cook stinks so badly (you'd know if ever you fried
    squid with a head of garlic). You always know when you're entering an Eyetalian neighborhood, aside
    from the friggin' stench most every other car is dark green... how many people you know drive green
    cars... of course the rest are black stretches, and lots of gaudily painted tow trucks... hey, the
    tow truck is the dago version of an SUV! <G>

    Ahahahahaha. . . . .

    ---= BOYCOTT FRENCH--GERMAN (belgium) =--- ---= Move UNITED NATIONS To Paris =--- Sheldon
    ```````````` "Life would be devoid of all meaning were it without tribulation."
     
  7. In article <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] (Nancree) wrote:

    > >> Does anyone remember what type of older style natural gas grill was the "generic" standard
    > >> of natural gas grills, with just a post in the ground about 15 years ago?
    > ---------------------------------
    > Just curious. Where does the gas come from? Here at our condominium the gas comes up from the
    > ground, through the pipe--requiring quite some installation work. Perhaps there is another type
    > that has a changeable small gas tank attached underneath the grill.
    >

    We've had both types -- a tap from the gas line, and a refillable propane tank that attaches to the
    grill. The former is stationary, the latter is portable.
    --
    -Barb, <www.jamlady.eboard.com> updated 2-19-04 -- Dufus picture posted!
     
  8. George

    George Guest

    "PENMART01" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > >(Nancree) writes
    > >
    > >>> Does anyone remember what type of older style natural gas grill was the "generic" standard
    > >>> of natural gas grills, with just a post in the ground about 15 years ago?
    > >---------------------------------
    > >Just curious. Where does the gas come from? Here at our condominium the
    gas
    > >comes up from the ground, through the pipe--requiring quite some
    installation
    > >work.
    >
    > You're lucky to have natural gas at a condo complex, most municipal fire
    codes
    > throuhgout the US no longer permit natural gas installed in multiple
    dwelling
    > complexes...

    Check your references. The specific reference document that is almost always incorporated into
    building/fire codes is NFPA 54 - National Fuel Gas Code. The current edition is 2002 with the next
    version scheduled in 2005. I am not aware of any prohibition of natural gas in multiple dwellings
    except perhaps on a limited local basis...
     
  9. Scubapix

    Scubapix Guest

    "Melba's Jammin'" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] (Tim) wrote:
    >
    > > Hello,
    > >
    > > Does anyone remember what type of older style natural gas grill was the "generic" standard of
    > > natural gas grills, with just a post in the ground about 15 years ago? I thought that there
    > > was one company that made most of them...
    > >
    > > Thanks...
    >
    > Ours was Charmglow.
    > --
    > -Barb, <www.jamlady.eboard.com> updated 2-19-04 -- Dufus picture posted!

    So IS ours a Charmglow, from the late 1960's. And it still works. We don't use it often because I
    got me a cermaic cooker for my last BIG birthday.
     
  10. George

    George Guest

    "PENMART01" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > Yes, but that only applies where usage is permitted and actually used.

    Always willing to learn something. I am not aware of any jurisdictions that prohibit natural gas
    in multi-family dwellings. That is what really caught my eye. Can you bring me up to date on
    those areas?

    >
    > NFPA has to do with *National* (not Municipal) installation, handling, and safety codes when fuel
    > is used... has nothing to do with Municipal laws regarding permits regarding use prohibitions...
    > how can one regulate
    proper use
    > of what is not permited? duh
    >
    The NFPA only writes codes but has no authority. The National Gas Code is written by them and the
    AGA (American Gas Association). Most areas do not have the expertise to write their own codes and
    there has been a big move for standardization in recent times so most areas simply adopt the
    National Gas Code as the legally enforcable set of rules (building & fire codes) for fuel gas in the
    same fashion as they adopt the National Electrical Code as the set of rules for electricity in their
    jurisdiction.
     
  11. Dimitri

    Dimitri Guest

    "Tim" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Hello,
    >
    > Does anyone remember what type of older style natural gas grill was the "generic" standard of
    > natural gas grills, with just a post in the ground about 15 years ago? I thought that there was
    > one company that made most of them...
    >
    > Thanks...

    A very popular brand many years ago was TURCO.

    IIRC the lid had the letters molded in.

    Parts are still available.

    http://www.appliancefactoryparts.com/gasgrillparts/brands/turco/

    Dimitri
     
  12. "wff_ng_6" <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    > "Tim" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> Does anyone remember what type of older style natural gas grill was the
    >> "generic" standard of natural gas grills, with just a post in the ground
    >> about 15 years ago? I thought that there was one company that made most of
    >> them...
    >
    > If you are actually talking about gas grilles older than that, Charmglow was
    > more or less the standard back in the 1960s and 70s for these. Gas grilles were
    > relatively rare back then, most everyone was using charcoal. I don't know how
    > long Charmglow remained dominant in the market.
    >
    >

    Ours was a Charmglos, installed back in 1968. It was used constantly and was
    replaced with the same model about ten eyars later. The gas was plumbed
    underground and came up through the post.

    When we later moved into a new house, the gas company recommended a flexible hose
    connecting the gas to an outlet on the sidewall of the house. We bought a Ducane
    and hated it. After one season, we replaced it with another Charmglow.

    I believe they were made by Warm Morning, the folks who used to make
    incinerators.

    Wayne
     
  13. In article <[email protected]>, "SCUBApix"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > "Melba's Jammin'" <[email protected]> wrote
    > in message
    > > Ours was Charmglow.
    >
    > So IS ours a Charmglow, from the late 1960's. And it still
    > works. We don't use it often because I got me a cermaic
    > cooker for my last BIG birthday.

    Excellent!!
    --
    -Barb, <www.jamlady.eboard.com> updated 3-5-04.
    Rec.food.cooking's Preserved Fruit Administrator (I've got
    the button to prove it!) "Always in a jam, never in a stew;
    sometimes in a pickle."
     
  14. Dave Smith

    Dave Smith Guest

    Nancree wrote:

    >
    > Just curious. Where does the gas come from? Here at our
    > condominium the gas comes up from the ground, through the
    > pipe--requiring quite some installation work. Perhaps
    > there is another type that has a changeable small gas tank
    > attached underneath the grill.

    They are two different types of gas. The portable tanks are
    propane. The stuff that comes through a pipe in the pipe is
    natural gas. It is hooked up to your main feed line if you
    have natural gas furnace, hot water, dryer or stove.
     
  15. Laura

    Laura Guest

    we have our current grill hooked up to the house gas. My
    parents always had the post kind hooked up to house natural
    gas, a few years with a tank grill and I was fed up. You
    need a special grill that is a little more expensive but it
    only cost 150 dollars or so to have the gas line extended
    outside. Ours looks like a regular gas grill, and sits on
    the deck. When we want to use it we attach a special hose to
    the gas line and turn a 'valve' on.

    --
    Laura

    GAYLAN FOR PRESIDENT

    I am a proud member of the mercury amalgam lyme antibiotic
    incest multiple sclerosis fiboromylagia vaccination
    survivors group. <troll trap>

    "PENMART01" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]
    m03.aol.com...
    > >Melba's Jammin' wrote:
    > >
    > >>[email protected] (Nancree) wrote:
    > >
    > >> >> Does anyone remember what type of older style
    > >> >> natural gas grill
    was
    > >> >> the "generic" standard of natural gas grills, with
    > >> >> just a post in
    the
    > >> >> ground about 15 years ago?
    > >> ---------------------------------
    > >> Just curious. Where does the gas come from? Here at our
    > >> condominium the gas comes up from the ground, through
    > >> the pipe--requiring quite some installation work.
    > >> Perhaps there is another type that has a changeable
    > >> small gas
    tank
    > >> attached underneath the grill.
    > >>
    > >
    > >We've had both types -- a tap from the gas line, and a
    > >refillable propane tank that attaches to the grill. The
    > >former is stationary, the latter is portable.
    >
    > Previously I had my Weber connected to natural gas, and
    > now to bulk
    propane...
    > but the grill is equiped with a 15' quick disconnect
    > hose... I think
    that's
    > portable.
    >
    >
    > ---= BOYCOTT FRENCH--GERMAN (belgium) =--- ---= Move
    > UNITED NATIONS To Paris =--- Sheldon ```````````` "Life
    > would be devoid of all meaning were it without
    > tribulation."
     
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