Old Shimano friction shifter question

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Brian Huntley, Apr 6, 2003.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. I've got a lovely set of old Shimano downtube shifters (actually stem mounted originally) with
    aluminum levers - very nice looking compared to the plastic and tin ones that came later. However, I
    have a few questions.

    The right (RD) and left (FD) mechanisms are completely different - the left being a simple set of
    plastic disks supplying friction, while the right has a notched metal disk, a small washer, and a
    single plastic disk. The metal disk fits over a nub inside the lever's central cavity, and as the
    nub is smaller than the notch, there's a bit of slop to the lever.

    1) Will this go away once cable pressure is applied?

    2) Why so complicated a design?

    Any help greatly appreciated.
     
    Tags:


  2. The right lever (rear derailleur) was designed to float back a bit after shifting, and the
    derailleur had (as they still do) a floating upper wheel to track the cog. The idea is that you pull
    the lever back to shift to a larger gear, overshifting a bit as you do, and, when you let the lever
    go, it floats into place. As I recall, they actually worked OK.

    --Mike-- Chain Reaction Bicycles http://www.ChainReactionBicycles.com

    "Brian Huntley" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >
    > I've got a lovely set of old Shimano downtube shifters (actually stem mounted originally) with
    > aluminum levers - very nice looking compared to the plastic and tin ones that came later. However,
    > I have a few questions.
    >
    > The right (RD) and left (FD) mechanisms are completely different - the left being a simple set of
    > plastic disks supplying friction, while the right has a notched metal disk, a small washer, and a
    > single plastic disk. The metal disk fits over a nub inside the lever's central cavity, and as the
    > nub is smaller than the notch, there's a bit of slop to the lever.
    >
    > 1) Will this go away once cable pressure is applied?
    >
    > 2) Why so complicated a design?
    >
    > Any help greatly appreciated.
     
  3. Mike Jacoubowsky wrote:
    > The right lever (rear derailleur) was designed to float back a bit after shifting, and the
    > derailleur had (as they still do) a floating upper wheel to track the cog. The idea is that you
    > pull the lever back to shift to a larger gear, overshifting a bit as you do, and, when you let the
    > lever go, it floats into place. As I recall, they actually worked OK.
    >

    Excellent! Thanks, Mike. That makes wonderful sense now.
     
Loading...
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
Loading...