Older Bianchi Road Bikes

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Ron Linz, Jan 31, 2004.

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  1. Ron Linz

    Ron Linz Guest

    I am wondering how the older Bianchi road bikes (1998) compare to the newer models. Are the frames
    and components comparable to what you can buy now? I have the chance to buy a 1998 Bianchi Velope
    double crank with low miles and wonder if it would be a worthwhile investment. I would be using it
    for club rides and fitness.
     
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  2. >I am wondering how the older Bianchi road bikes (1998) compare to the newer models. Are the frames
    >and components comparable to what you can buy now? I have the chance to buy a 1998 Bianchi Velope
    >double crank with low miles and wonder if it would be a worthwhile investment. I would be using it
    >for club rides and fitness.

    It's probably fine. The Veloce (I think you meant) has always been a good value in an entry level
    road bike with Campagnolo components and Bianchi quality.

    If you can stand the color, a 1998 is probably a good deal at US $300 or so, but it depends on
    condition.

    In terms of how does it compare to current road bikes, it's very similar. If it's in your size, I'd
    say it isn't a bad investment if you're shelling out $300 or so. I'd remind you that the new ones
    cost about a grand. You may have to replace chain and cassette but that and the brakes are trivial.

    --

    _______________________ALL AMIGA IN MY MIND_______________________ ------------------"Buddy Holly,
    the Texas Elvis"------------------
    __________306.350.357.38>>[email protected]__________
     
  3. Kevan Smith

    Kevan Smith Guest

    On Sat, 31 Jan 2004 17:43:28 -0600, Ron Linz <[email protected]> from Your
    Company wrote:

    >I am wondering how the older Bianchi road bikes (1998) compare to the newer models. Are the frames
    >and components comparable to what you can buy now? I have the chance to buy a 1998 Bianchi Velope
    >double crank with low miles and wonder if it would be a worthwhile investment. I would be using it
    >for club rides and fitness.

    That would be a fine bike for your purposes. Are you sure it is the right size for you? Also, you
    might want to find out some current market prices for it so you don't pay too much.

    --
    [email protected]
    Assemble some of the elements in a group and treat the group.
    99
     
  4. Dan Daniel

    Dan Daniel Guest

    On Sat, 31 Jan 2004 17:43:28 -0600, Ron Linz <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >I am wondering how the older Bianchi road bikes (1998) compare to the newer models. Are the frames
    >and components comparable to what you can buy now? I have the chance to buy a 1998 Bianchi Velope
    >double crank with low miles and wonder if it would be a worthwhile investment. I would be using it
    >for club rides and fitness.

    Velope? Never heard of it. Volpe is a cyclocross-style bike that is still made. Bianchi also makes a
    Veloce, but I do not know when they started that model; maybe someone else will know if there is a
    1988 Veloce. The Volpe I had came with a triple crank, but some cross bikes are set up with doubles.

    I have had two Bianchis from the mid/late 80s- a Brava and a Volpe. Both on the lower end of the
    product line, but both very nice bikes in their ways.

    One thing to watch for is having to replace/upgrade parts. This can get to be expensive. Unless you
    really know how to judge these things, plan on having to replace the chainwheels, chain, and
    cassette, and probably the brake pads, cables, and housing. Oh, bottom bracket, hub bearings and
    probably a cone or two or three. The headset.... Tires... how are the rims?

    If the parts are low miles and have been maintained, and the price is good- you would get a
    perfectly fine bike. If it is a Volpe, the one I had was on the heavy side.

    Component-wise, today's bikes are probably better. And finding parts will be much easier. Getting 6
    or 7 speed parts is becoming harder and harder. You will probably be better off throwing out the
    existing system and upgrading to a present 9 or 10 when the existing parts wear out.

    If you can be certain that the bike is in good shape and won't need a lot of money, you can get
    some very nice bikes from that time, including Bianchis. As a labor of love, it can be fun to
    rebuild such bikes. I've done four of them in the last five years- two Bianchis, a Nishiki, and a
    Falcon- and enjoyed it. Financially, all of them were stupid wastes. Aesthetically and personally,
    no regrets.

    But hey- the real thing that matters is how the bike fits you and how you like the ride. My $50
    garage sale Falcon with the 531 tubing is out for alignment, fender and rack braze-ons, and new
    paint and I can't wait to get it back on the road. Anything less than a great ride on the 'Velope,'
    I'd say don't do it.
     
  5. Ron Linz

    Ron Linz Guest

    "Eric S. Sande" <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    >>I am wondering how the older Bianchi road bikes (1998) compare to the newer models. Are the frames
    >>and components comparable to what you can buy now? I have the chance to buy a 1998 Bianchi Velope
    >>double crank with low miles and wonder if it would be a worthwhile investment. I would be using it
    >>for club rides and fitness.
    >
    > It's probably fine. The Veloce (I think you meant) has always been a good value in an entry level
    > road bike with Campagnolo components and Bianchi quality.
    >
    > If you can stand the color, a 1998 is probably a good deal at US $300 or so, but it depends on
    > condition.
    >
    > In terms of how does it compare to current road bikes, it's very similar. If it's in your size,
    > I'd say it isn't a bad investment if you're shelling out $300 or so. I'd remind you that the new
    > ones cost about a grand. You may have to replace chain and cassette but that and the brakes are
    > trivial.
    >

    I meant Veloce. The price is $500 but maybe I could get it for less.
     
  6. >I meant Veloce. The price is $500 but maybe I could get it for less.

    If it's perfect $500 is still high. This is a stock entry level road bike that is, well, 5 years
    old. I'd go $350 on it but I wouldn't pay over $400 without a complete tune up job.

    --

    _______________________ALL AMIGA IN MY MIND_______________________ ------------------"Buddy Holly,
    the Texas Elvis"------------------
    __________306.350.357.38>>[email protected]__________
     
  7. Dan Daniel

    Dan Daniel Guest

    On Sat, 31 Jan 2004 18:08:17 -0800, Dan Daniel
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    Hmmmm.... guess I better get the classes checked and stop talking about 1980s' bikes when someone
    asks about a 1998 bike. My mistake.
     
  8. Dan Daniel <[email protected]> wrote:
    : Hmmmm.... guess I better get the classes checked and stop talking about 1980s' bikes when someone
    : asks about a 1998 bike. My mistake.

    personally, i'm more than a little creeped out by his definition of older.
    --
    david reuteler [email protected]
     
  9. >personally, i'm more than a little creeped out by his definition of older.

    It isn't anything you don't have to deal with, David.

    One minute it's reading glasses and the next it's colostomy bags, what a shitty way to go.

    Luckily we're still riding, I hope, with our balls up and the rubber side down, etc.

    --

    _______________________ALL AMIGA IN MY MIND_______________________ ------------------"Buddy Holly,
    the Texas Elvis"------------------
    __________306.350.357.38>>[email protected]__________
     
  10. Eric S. Sande <[email protected]> wrote:
    : One minute it's reading glasses and the next it's colostomy bags, what a shitty way to go.

    please, eric. don't sugercoat it. tell me what it's really like.
    --
    david reuteler [email protected]
     
  11. Zoot Katz

    Zoot Katz Guest

    01 Feb 2004 05:11:22 GMT,
    <[email protected]>, David Reuteler
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Eric S. Sande <[email protected]> wrote:
    >: One minute it's reading glasses and the next it's colostomy bags, what a shitty way to go.
    >
    >please, eric. don't sugercoat it. tell me what it's really like.

    Nobody around to empty the bag for you.
    --
    zk
     
  12. Matt O'Toole

    Matt O'Toole Guest

    Ron Linz wrote:

    > "Eric S. Sande" <[email protected]> wrote in news:[email protected]:
    >
    >>> I am wondering how the older Bianchi road bikes (1998) compare to the newer models. Are the
    >>> frames and components comparable to what you can buy now? I have the chance to buy a 1998
    >>> Bianchi Velope double crank with low miles and wonder if it would be a worthwhile investment. I
    >>> would be using it for club rides and fitness.
    >>
    >> It's probably fine. The Veloce (I think you meant) has always been a good value in an entry level
    >> road bike with Campagnolo components and Bianchi quality.
    >>
    >> If you can stand the color, a 1998 is probably a good deal at US $300 or so, but it depends on
    >> condition.
    >>
    >> In terms of how does it compare to current road bikes, it's very similar. If it's in your size,
    >> I'd say it isn't a bad investment if you're shelling out $300 or so. I'd remind you that the new
    >> ones cost about a grand. You may have to replace chain and cassette but that and the brakes are
    >> trivial.
    >>
    >
    > I meant Veloce. The price is $500 but maybe I could get it for less.

    That's not a bad price either, if the bike is in really good shape. Basically it depends on
    condition -- replacing worn drivetrain parts is expensive. Would *I* pay $500 for a low mileage
    Veloce? Yes, if it was practically new. If not, I'd go down a bit. It's hard to find a nice Ergo/STI
    equipped bike for less than about $450. Selling prices on eBay are about in this range.

    Matt O.
     
  13. Matt O'Toole

    Matt O'Toole Guest

    David Reuteler wrote:

    > Dan Daniel <[email protected]> wrote:

    >> Hmmmm.... guess I better get the classes checked and stop talking about 1980s' bikes when someone
    >> asks about a 1998 bike. My mistake.
    >
    > personally, i'm more than a little creeped out by his definition of older.

    Yeah, that kind of struck me too!

    Matt O.
     
  14. David Kerber

    David Kerber Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    > >personally, i'm more than a little creeped out by his definition of older.
    >
    > It isn't anything you don't have to deal with, David.
    >
    > One minute it's reading glasses and the next it's colostomy bags, what a shitty way to go.

    Well considering that I started wearing glasses about 33 years ago (10 years old), and I hope I'm
    still 40 years or more away from a colostomy bag, there's a pretty big middle ground there <GGG>

    > Luckily we're still riding, I hope, with our balls up and the rubber side down, etc.

    Hopefully, riding will extend the time span mentioned above!

    --
    Dave Kerber Fight spam: remove the ns_ from the return address before replying!

    REAL programmers write self-modifying code.
     
  15. I have a 97 San Remo and a 98 Eros both 61 cm. They have had winter
    overhauls and I'm ready for something different. they set in the basement as
    the snow passes the 15 in. level.
    "Ron Linz" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I am wondering how the older Bianchi road bikes (1998) compare to the newer models. Are the frames
    > and components comparable to what you can buy now? I have the chance to buy a 1998 Bianchi Velope
    > double crank with low miles and wonder if it would be a worthwhile investment. I would be using it
    > for club rides and fitness.
     
  16. On the same topic, but with a different objective, does anyone recall where the Vittoria fit in to
    the Bianchi spectrum of bikes?
     
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