Onboard Bicycle Maintenance Pack

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Gary, Jan 23, 2003.

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  1. Gary

    Gary Guest

    Hi,

    I am going to be doing roughly 3 - 4 hours of cycling daily as of next week and I am wondering what
    kind of "Maintenance Equipment" I should carry? For example Foot or Hand pump? Puncture Repair kit?
    Spare Tube? I am a novice, and have no idea what to take with me. Someone also said Allan Keys may
    be handy. Also, should I get a kit that packs on the bike? I don't mind wearing a small rucksack.

    Thanks for any tips!

    Gary.
     
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  2. On Sat, 04 Jan 2003 17:51:25 GMT, "Gary" <[email protected]> wrote:
    > Hi,
    >
    > I am going to be doing roughly 3 - 4 hours of cycling daily as
    of next week
    > and I am wondering what kind of "Maintenance Equipment" I
    should carry?
    > For example Foot or Hand pump? Puncture Repair kit? Spare Tube? I am a novice, and have no idea
    > what to take with me. Someone
    also said
    > Allan Keys may be handy.

    Minimum: Frame pump--get one that fits along the inside of your top tube and then stop worrying.

    puncture repair kit. tyre levers a must.

    re Allen keys:

    If you want to go superlight, carry a Park MT-1 multitool and the above and you'll be mostly
    okay...unless anyone else on the NG has remembered something I've forgotten?

    I have a Topeak Alien, too.--the biggest sort, with all the goodies in it, but since I'm on a budget
    my 'mobile' toolkit is also my 'stationary' toolkit. With an MT-1 and an alien I have two of every
    size allen key i need easily at hand...but that was handy for attaching things like carriers &
    mudguards at home.

    > Also, should I get a kit that packs on the bike? I don't mind
    wearing a
    > small rucksack.

    you should be able to get a little underseat wedge that straps to the rails of the saddle and the
    seatpost. dont' carry a rucksack. your back will sweat; sweat will pool there, and chill, and you
    will feel miserable and smell worse when you get home.

    -Luigi

    ---
    TLP de Guzman Bankside House 24 Sumner Street London SE1 9JA UNITED KINGDOM

    tel: +44 870 873 4587, ext.2766 (landline)
    : +44 781 792 1610 (mobile)

    "Ka-tagal-tagal ko na nag-aaral, tignan mo, kupas na ang aking maong! Kung akala mo ako ay natuto
    na, Hindi pa rin..."
    - Apo Hiking Society
     
  3. On Sun, 5 Jan 2003 16:16:26 +0000 (UTC), "Fred" <"Fred"@btinternet.com> wrote:
    > I've read all the good advice with reference to tools for your
    bike, but
    > nobody mentioned maintenance for yourself! As a self-confessed newbie, I wonder
    how you will
    > stay in the saddle for 3 or 4 hrs without becoming saddle sore

    careful bicycle selection. also careful bicycle saddle selection, and good positioning.

    > or straining muscles you never knew you had

    Sore happens. No big deal. you have a shower at home, use that...

    >and what about those grazes you are possibly going to suffer from when using tools you've never
    >used before? And of

    practice at home in non-crisis situations.

    > course, sustenance such as Mars Bars and maybe BEER ( what is >
    behind the

    chocolate gets gooey on the ride. mess. beer cans are heavy and get too warm, not to mentiona all
    the shaking from road bumps. If I'm in imminent danger of hunger on a ride, I'll usually find a way
    to resupply on the way. If I'm going into the country for the day, I'll carry a racktop bag.
    problem solved.

    save the beers for after. and while you're up buying, get me one. it's your round, isn't it?

    -Luigi

    ---
    TLP de Guzman Bankside House 24 Sumner Street London SE1 9JA UNITED KINGDOM

    tel: +44 870 873 4587, ext.2766 (landline)
    : +44 781 792 1610 (mobile)

    "Ka-tagal-tagal ko na nag-aaral, tignan mo, kupas na ang aking maong! Kung akala mo ako ay natuto
    na, Hindi pa rin..."
    - Apo Hiking Society
     
  4. "Just zis Guy, you know?" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > On Sun, 5 Jan 2003 16:16:26 +0000 (UTC), "Fred" <"Fred"@btinternet.com> wrote:
    >
    > >nobody mentioned maintenance for yourself!
    >
    > Or indeed repairs. A doctor on uk.rec.cycling has suggested that a basic first aid kit is small,
    > light, and a pretty good idea.

    I have in my first aid pack: small envelope of sunscreen small envelope antibiotic ointment small
    envelope of antiseptic wipes small envelope containing 2 aspirin 3-4 bandaids

    This is about the size of three credit cards. Please note, if you are biking with kids, they won't
    be able to cope with adult aspirin -- you'll need to bring some chewable form of pain reliever.

    Warm regards,

    Claire Petersky ([email protected]) Home of the meditative cyclist at:
    http://home.earthlink.net/~cpetersky/Welcome.htm
     
  5. Topeak Alien, mini-pump (I use one of those little hoses off a football pump, too), water bottles,
    munchies, patch kit, spare change in a film cannister, and a washrag. "Gary" <[email protected]>
    wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Hi,
    >
    > I am going to be doing roughly 3 - 4 hours of cycling daily as of next
    week
    > and I am wondering what kind of "Maintenance Equipment" I should carry? For example Foot or Hand
    > pump? Puncture Repair kit? Spare Tube? I am a novice, and have no idea what to take with me.
    > Someone also said Allan Keys may be handy. Also, should I get a kit that packs on the bike? I
    > don't mind wearing a small rucksack.
    >
    > Thanks for any tips!
    >
    > Gary.
     
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