Onboard Bicycle Maintenance Pack



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Clive George

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"Pete Biggs" <pLime{remove_fruit}@biggs.tc> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...

> Best method: (you probably do this already, but for benefit of anyone interested...)
> 1. Sand and apply a coating of rubber cement to area on tube larger than patch
> 2. Allow to completely dry (rubber cement is a dry contact adhesive)
> 3. Apply patch (without any added cement), press down firmly. This will usually work but if
> any edges don't stick, add cement (under and on top of patch edge) - wait until tacky then
> press and hold down, repeat as necessary
> 4. Chalk/talc
> 5. If convenient, leave to cure for several hours before inflating

You forgot the razor blades :)

(actually I used that trick this christmas - lots of flashing and text on the tube I was trying to
fix, grr).

cheers, clive
 
A

Andymorris

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Pete Biggs wrote:
> AndyMorris wrote:
>> On a similar note, where can you get patches _small_ enough for narrow inner tubes < 27mm.
>
> I recommend 15mm round Velox patches from http://www.mwdyason.ltd.uk - which I use succesfully
> with 19-23 tubes. (They also do larger patches)
>
>> I always find the patches are so big that they overlap the edges of the (flattened) inner tube
>> and are a git to get them to stick.
>
> ...These patches are quite thin and have feathered edges so will stick well even when overlapping
> edges or ridges (if use method below).
>
> Best method: (you probably do this already, but for benefit of anyone interested...)
> 1. Sand and apply a coating of rubber cement to area on tube larger than patch
> 2. Allow to completely dry (rubber cement is a dry contact adhesive)
> 3. Apply patch (without any added cement), press down firmly. This will usually work but if
> any edges don't stick, add cement (under and on top of patch edge) - wait until tacky then
> press and hold down, repeat as necessary
> 4. Chalk/talc
> 5. If convenient, leave to cure for several hours before inflating
>
> ~PB

While I'm at it...

Does anyone else have trouble keeping track of where the hole is, especially after spreading the
glue around because it always comes out in too big a blob?

--
Andy Morris

AndyAtJinkasDotFreeserve.Co.UK

Love this: Put an end to Outlook Express's messy quotes
http://home.in.tum.de/~jain/software/oe-quotefix/
 
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Call Me Bob

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On Wed, 15 Jan 2003 16:30:37 +0000, Gordon BP <[email protected]> wrote:

>Well on a 70 mile training ride I would take 2 tyre levers (3 are unneccesary),2 spare tubes, chain
>link tool,spare chain link, small pliers, small adjustable spanner, a combination screwdriver, a
>spare rear gear cable, a spare rear brake cable and a folding tyre. This would all wrap up in the
>racing cape and be carried under the saddle with a spare toestrap!

What happens if you want to use your racing cape?

Bob
--
Mail address is spam trapped To reply by email remove the beverage
 
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Geraint Jones

Guest
"AndyMorris" <[email protected]> wrote: ( Does anyone else have trouble keeping track of
where the hole is, especially ) after spreading the glue around because it always comes out in too
big a ( blob?

Inflate the tube ever-such-a-little before trying to apply the patch: it will blow bubbles in the
solution to identify the position of the leak.
 
P

Pete Biggs

Guest
AndyMorris wrote:
> Does anyone else have trouble keeping track of where the hole is, especially after spreading the
> glue around because it always comes out in too big a blob?

Yes!

Before glueing, make a "cross-hair" marking on the tube using crayon (or Tip-Ex if at home).

~PB
 
D

David Nutter

Guest
AndyMorris <[email protected]> said:
> Pete Biggs wrote:

> Does anyone else have trouble keeping track of where the hole is, especially after spreading the
> glue around because it always comes out in too big a blob?

I keep an old piece of patch backing (the stiff silver stuff) in the kit for spreading the solution
around on the inner tube. Once the patch has been applied, throw away the soiled piece of backing
and replace it with the one you've just taken off the new patch.

Regards,

-david
 
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Bert Smith

Guest
Gordon BP <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:<[email protected]>...
> >
> >>Bert Smith scribed after much navel searching:
> >>
> >>>I have the same small wedgie for mtbing, commuting, audax and short road rides. It contains the
> >>>following:
> >>>
> >>
> >>Good grief! why not have a sag wagon follow you with a spare bike? :)
> >
> >
> > Hey, not fair! My OBBMP is small - only 20cm long and 750g, as mentioned in previous post. That
> > is not much for peace of mind on a 150 mile bike ride. I have used, at some point, every single
> > tool in the bag. A sag waggon would weigh at least 1000x as much (though it's a nice idea...)
> Well on a 70 mile training ride I would take 2 tyre levers (3 are unneccesary),2 spare tubes,
> chain link tool,spare chain link, small pliers, small adjustable spanner, a combination
> screwdriver, a spare rear gear cable, a spare rear brake cable and a folding tyre. This would all
> wrap up in the racing cape and be carried under the saddle with a spare toestrap!

You should weigh your allegedly micro OBBMP - you may be surprised. Anyway, if you are training, you
should welcome the extra weight :)
 
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